Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian

one response to his letter is to think it’s inspiring, touching, even, that there’s a billionaire out there who wants to build an “infrastructure”, a word he uses 24 times, that “prevents harm, helps during crises and rebuilds afterwards”.But here’s another response: where does that power end? Who holds it to account? What are the limits on it? Because the answer is there are none. Facebook’s power and dominance, its knowledge of every aspect of its users’ intimate lives, its ability to manipulate their – our – world view, its limitless ability to generate cash, is already beyond the reach of any government.

Fuente: Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian


Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian

We have to take action now to root out Russian and other foreign influences before they become too deeply enmeshed in our political ecosystem. First and foremost, leaders in the US and Europe must stop any attempt by the Trump administration to ease sanctions on Russia. It must be abundantly clear that attacking our elections through cyberspace will prompt a tough and proportional response.

Fuente: Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian


Empresas tecnológicas denuncian decreto antiinmigración de Trump ante la justicia

Varias decenas de empresas tecnológicas, incluidas Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft y Twitter, presentaron la noche del domingo un documento legal ante la justicia de Estados Unidos contra el decreto antiinmigración del presidente Donald Trump.

Fuente: Empresas tecnológicas denuncian decreto antiinmigración de Trump ante la justicia


Por un populismo digital / Blog AGETIC

no es falso considerar hoy en día que todos estos datos que proveemos a los gigantes de la economía digital en cada uno de nuestros actos digitales (simplemente, por ejemplo, desplazándonos con un teléfono geolocalizado), y que nos revenden luego bajo la forma de servicios diversos, constituye una de las expoliaciones del bien del pueblo más espectacular de la Historia.

Fuente: Por un populismo digital / Blog AGETIC


Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian

Alisa Shevchenko is a talented young Russian hacker, known for working with companies to find vulnerabilities in their systems. She is also, the White House claims, guilty of helping Vladimir Putin interfere in the US election.

Fuente: Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian


Invasion of the troll armies: ‘Social media where the war goes on’ | Media | The Guardian

Governments all over the world are manipulating social media for their own ends. That’s where the digital footsoldiers come in – smearing opponents, spreading disinformation and posting fake texts for ‘pocket money’

Fuente: Invasion of the troll armies: ‘Social media where the war goes on’ | Media | The Guardian


Chilenos crean primer portal de propaganda política que busca posicionarse a escala global – El Mostrador

La plataforma virtual, www.propagandainteligente.com, iniciará operaciones en Chile y el resto de los países de la región por lo que el llamado es a todos los candidatos a subir sus propuestas políticas de forma gratuita, a través de un perfil básico y de esa manera posicionarse de manera más eficiente.

Fuente: Chilenos crean primer portal de propaganda política que busca posicionarse a escala global – El Mostrador


Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income | Technology | The Guardian

Silicon Valley has, paradoxically, become one of the most vocal proponents of universal basic income (UBI). Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen, web guru Tim O’Reilly and a cadre of other Silicon Valley denizens have expressed support for the “social vaccine of the 21st century”, and influential incubator Y Combinator announced on 31 May that it will be conducting its own basic income experiment with a pilot study of 100 families in Oakland, California – a short hop over the San Francisco bay.

Fuente: Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income | Technology | The Guardian


The only living Trump supporter in Silicon Valley | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The most interesting discovery of the week was not that IBM, Citigroup and Microsoft were unwittingly running ads on (and therefore providing funds to) an Indonesian jihadi website – though they were – but that Peter Thiel is supporting Donald Trump in his bid to become the next president of the United States.

Fuente: The only living Trump supporter in Silicon Valley | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard

Back in July of last year, the controversial government spying and hacking tool seller Hacking Team was hacked itself by an outside attacker. The breach made headlines worldwide, but no one knew much about the perpetrator or how he did it.That mystery has finally been revealed.

Fuente: The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard


De Wikileaks a Mexicoleaks – horizontal

De Wikileaks a Mexicoleaks – horizontal.

Antonio Martínez Velázquez
La aparición de la plataforma Mexicoleaks plantea algunas preguntas acerca de su éxito como instrumento político. La experiencia de Wikileaks nos indica que los retos serán mayúsculos y que la coalición presentada deberá sortear la presión de sus enemigos.

Después de la filtración de cientos de miles de cables diplomáticos del Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos, Wikileaks llegó a la cúspide de su éxito. El modelo fue imaginado por Julian Assange en un oscuro ensayo escrito en el año 2006, en el que postula una suerte de teoría crítica del Estado y una solución al problema de dicha organización: el Estado es una conspiración sostenida por la comunicación secreta entre sus partes y para terminar con esta basta con exhibir el contenido de la conjura. Ocho años después de su puesta en operaciones, Wikileaks no puede declararse triunfador si la unidad de medida es la consecución de sus fines. Su éxito ha estado definido por oposición.


Merkel reconoce que “Europa no es una tierra de futuro para los jóvenes” | Economía | EL PAÍS

Merkel reconoce que “Europa no es una tierra de futuro para los jóvenes” | Economía | EL PAÍS.

 

Angela Merkel, durante su intervención en la conferencia “Instituto Vodafone para la Sociedad y Comunicación” en Berlín. / BERND VON JUTRCZENKA (EFE)

La canciller alemana, Angela Merkel, reconoció este jueves que “Europa no es ahora mismo una tierra de futuro para los jóvenes”, que sufren tasas de desempleo del 30% o el 40%, y tienen escasa confianza en encontrar un puesto de trabajo. Para revertir esa situación, la dirigente germana apuesta por la “economía digital como motor de crecimiento de la UE” y única capaz de generar nuevos empleos.

Merkel, que inauguró el foro Digitising Europe, que reúne en Berlín a representantes de multinacionales tecnológicas, expertos del mundo digital, y representantes de varios gobiernos, indicó que el 90% de los nuevos empleos en un mundo globalizado se crean fuera de Europa y que la apuesta por las tecnologías y la digitalización “no es una oportunidad sino una necesidad” para revertir esa situación.

La canciller indicó que es preciso acelerar la Agenda Digital europea, y cerrar una regulación global que permita el desarrollo de proyectos de emprendedores (start up), con medidas fiscales, impulsando las redes de nueva generación y asegurando el acceso a Internet de toda la población, independientemente de donde vivan.

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“La industria 4.0 es la única posibilidad de que Europa se enganche”, alerta

Merkel señaló que administración, empresas y universidades deben trabajar juntos por atraer inversiones en tecnología en industrias tradicionales como el automóvil, la química o transportes para que vuelvan a generar empleos para los jóvenes. “La industria 4.0 es la única posibilidad de que Europa se enganche”, dijo la canciller en alusión al proyecto de alta tecnología que promueve el Gobierno alemán para digitalizar los sectores manufactureros.


Here's how data thieves have captured our lives on the internet | John Naughton | Comment is free | The Observer

Here’s how data thieves have captured our lives on the internet | John Naughton | Comment is free | The Observer.

It’s not just governments. Companies such as Google and Facebook spy on us too. We have clicked through to their ‘free’ digital services at the cost of sacrificing our privacy. So how do we get out?
shopping icon computer screen

Internet surveillance. Everything we do online is tracked. Photograph: Alamy

Whatever else 2013 will be remembered for, it will be known as the year in which a courageous whistleblower brought home to us the extent to which the most liberating communications technology since printing has been captured.

Although Edward Snowden‘s revelations initially seemed only to document the extent to which the state had exploited internet technology to create a surveillance system of unimaginable comprehensiveness, as the leaks flowed it gradually dawned on us that our naive lust for “free” stuff online had also enabled commercial interests effectively to capture the internet for their own purposes.

And, as if that realisation wasn’t traumatic enough, Snowden’s revelations demonstrated the extent to which the corporate sector – the Googles, Facebooks, Yahoos and Microsofts of this world – have been, knowingly or unknowingly, complicit in spying on us.

What it boils down to is this: we now know for sure that nothing that you do online is immune to surveillance, and the only people who retain any hope of secure communications are geeks who understand cryptography and use open-source software.

In The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires, his magisterial history of the main communications technologies of the 20th century – telephone, radio, movies and television – the legal scholar Timothy Wu discerned a pattern.

Each technology started out as magnificently open, chaotic, collaborative, creative, exuberant and experimental, but in the end all were “captured” by charismatic entrepreneurs who went on to build huge industrial empires on the back of this capture. This is what has become known as the Wu cycle – “a typical progression of information technologies: from somebody’s hobby to somebody’s industry; from jury-rigged contraption to slick production marvel; from a freely accessible channel to one strictly controlled by a single corporation or cartel – from open to closed system”.

The big question, Wu asked, was whether the internet would be any different? Ten years ago, I would have answered: “Yes.” Having digested Snowden’s revelations, I am less sure, because one of the things he has demonstrated is the extent to which the NSA has suborned the internet companies which have captured the online activities of billions of internet users. It has done this via demands authorised by the secret foreign intelligence surveillance (Fisa) court, but kept secret from the companies’ users; and by tapping into the communications that flow between the companies’ server farms across the world.

The reason this made sense is because so much of our communications and data are now entrusted to these internet giants. Tapping into them must have seemed a no-brainer to the NSA. After all, Google and Facebook are essentially in the same business as the agency. Its mission – comprehensive surveillance – also happens to be their business model.

The only difference is that whereas the spooks have to jump through some modest legal hoops to inspect our content, the companies get to read it neat. And the great irony is that this has been made possible because of our gullibility. The internet companies offered us shiny new “free” services in return for our acceptance of click-wrap “agreements” which allow them to do anything they damn well please with our data and content. And we fell for it. We built the padded cells in which we now gambol and which the NSA bugs at its leisure.


Lunch with the FT: Peter Thiel – FT.com

Lunch with the FT: Peter Thiel – FT.com.

 

The billionaire investor and libertarian thinker believes that in a world of government surveillance, more technology is the answer
Illustration of Peter Thiel by James Ferguson©James Ferguson

Peter Thiel has only just sat down at a corner table in Palo Alto’s Evvia restaurant and he is already into a disquisition on the history of financial bubbles.

“This,” he declares, after listing the frequent market eruptions of the past three decades, “is historically very anomalous. There was one bubble in the 1920s and one in the 1720s.”

It is the sort of sweeping statement, delivered with flat finality, that Thiel thrives on. Since he has made billion-dollar fortunes twice over, in very different corners of the investment world (though one of the billions was promptly lost again), you’re inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt.

But you also can’t help thinking: really? What of the railroad bubble of the 1870s or the periodic booms and busts of capitalism’s gilded age? As with many of the eclectic assertions Thiel (pronounced “teal”) uses to pepper his conversation – allusions to Dickens and Shakespeare as well as the broad swaths of economic, technological and political history – you wish you could secretly Google under the table to fact-check.

Now the 46-year-old Facebook billionaire, former hedge fund star and self-styled libertarian Big Thinker is ready to declare one final bubble. This time it is the result of excessive government borrowing to refloat a world struggling to get beyond the financial crisis. With this, he argues, we have arrived at the Last Bubble. There will be no more. Period.

 


Expertos llaman al próximo gobierno a incorporar uso “permanente y transversal” de TICs a la malla curricular – El Mostrador

Expertos llaman al próximo gobierno a incorporar uso “permanente y transversal” de TICs a la malla curricular – El Mostrador.

La tecnologías de la información y la comunicación salen a la palestra luego de que la propia Unesco señalara que en los últimos tres años la educación en línea pasó de tener 22 millones de alumnos a 25 millones.

teclado

Tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC’s), infraestructura, el concepto de “Tercera Plataforma” y la calidad en los mecanismos de transmisión de datos son algunos de los elementos que, según expertos de Edutic Chile (una asociación de profesionales de la educación superior que buscan implementar el uso de las tecnologías de la información), se debiesen incorporar al plan educacional que se implementará en los próximos cuatro años.

Cuando se debate sobre la necesidad de mejorar la calidad y la equidad en la enseñanza chilena, Hernán Silva, director ejecutivo de Edutic, destacó que uno de los grandes desafíos para el próximo gobierno será “nivelar la tremenda brecha en infraestructura y calidad tecnológica que tenemos, tanto en la limitada banda ancha y de todos los mecanismos de transmisión de datos que se vincula a Internet, como también de la desigual accesibilidad social a dispositivos y redes.”