The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian

“Muslims are like cockroaches. An infestation that needs to be eradicated. Immediately. Permanently”, reads the tweet by one of thousands of anonymous far-right Twitter accounts that spread hate against ethnic and religious minorities each day.

Fuente: The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian


WikiLeaks operative claims Russia did NOT provide Hillary Clinton emails | Daily Mail Online

Craig Murray, former British ambassador to Uzbekistan and associate of Julian Assange, told the Dailymail.com he flew to Washington, D.C. for emails. He claims he had a clandestine hand-off in a wooded area near American University with one of the email sources. The leakers’ motivation was ‘disgust at the corruption of the Clinton Foundation and the ’tilting of the primary election playing field against Bernie Sanders’Murray says: ‘The source had legal access to the information. The documents came from inside leaks, not hacks’

Fuente: WikiLeaks operative claims Russia did NOT provide Hillary Clinton emails | Daily Mail Online


UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat

“The connectivity that is at the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims deniably,” said Mr Younger. “They do this through means as varied as cyber attacks, propaganda or subversion of democratic process.”

Fuente: UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


‘Trident is old technology’: the brave new world of cyber warfare | Technology | The Guardian

Forget debates about Britain’s nuclear deterrent. New technology means a country can be brought to its knees with the click of a mouse

Fuente: ‘Trident is old technology’: the brave new world of cyber warfare | Technology | The Guardian


Why UK politicians could learn a lot from the Pirate party | Comment is free | The Guardian

Why UK politicians could learn a lot from the Pirate party | Comment is free | The Guardian.

 Supporters of the Pirate party in Germany.Supporters of the Pirate party in Germany. Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters

With just 22 days to go until the election starts, like many social media addicts I am wondering just how much more Official Political Tweeting I can take.

Politics with a small p is, of course, on fire. My social media feeds sizzle with the anger of people from across the globe: over the racism of cops in Ferguson, US, over the destruction of antiquities by Isis, over Jihadi John, over Netanyahu’s 26 standing ovations and, above all, over the alleged criminal behaviour of bankers.

Yet the average mainstream politician runs a Twitter feed sublimely indifferent to the issues that excite the world. “Glad to be on the doorstep in Acme-shire, where we had a good discussion about local nursery provision,” is typical MP’s tweet. It is often accompanied by a photograph of the said meeting, in which nobody at all looks glad, nor indeed involved in any kind of discussion.

The social media output of MPs looks even more unhinged when you see it in the context of the debates raging among their constituents online. In fact, if you look closely at people in a party political hustings these days, you will find many of the punters and all the journalists glued to their phones, discussing almost everything except what the meeting is about.

In this context, the decision by the UK’s newly founded Pirate party to crowdsource its manifesto looks interesting. The Pirate party phenomenon started in Sweden in 2006 and spread to 20 EU countries including Germany, where it secured its one MEP in the 2014 elections.

Up to now, its obsessions have been grouped around the issues of internet freedom, state surveillance and the monopolisation of intellectual property and communications. But a glance at the Reddit page where the crowdsourced UK manifesto is being assembled reveals a much wider agenda. If you discount the pure techie stuff, the top five policies being discussed right now are publication of all government documents; removal of CCTV from public places; exempting small businesses from EU VAT rules; scaling all fines against a convicted person’s wealth; and – as with the Greens – paying everybody a basic income from taxation.

If you interrogate the subtext of these discussions, it is possible to come up with quite an accurate picture of what this part of the UK electorate is worried about. Namely, the size and unaccountable power of the state; criminality and tax evasion among corporations; and the venality and powerlessness of official politics. And though the Pirate party’s membership is small, my online life tells me these are indeed the political worries of a generation.


Labour to overhaul spy agency controls in response to Snowden files | UK news | The Guardian

Labour to overhaul spy agency controls in response to Snowden files | UK news | The Guardian.

Yvette Cooper says debate over privacy, civil liberties and the role of the intelligence agencies has barely started in Britain

 

 

YVETTE COOPER

Cooper will argue it is damaging to trust in the agencies if ministers continue to hide their heads in the sand. Photograph: David Gadd/Allstar/Sportsphoto Ltd.

 

Labour will on Monday propose substantial changes to the oversight of the British intelligence agencies, including the legal framework under which they operate, in response to the revelations emerging from files leaked by Edward Snowden.

The shadow home secretary, Yvette Cooper, is preparing to argue that the current arrangements are unsustainable for the government, and that it is damaging to trust in the agencies if ministers continue to hide their heads in the sand.

In a speech that represents Labour’s most serious intervention since the controversy about the scale of state surveillance broke last summer, she will say: “The oversight and legal frameworks are now out of date. In particular that means we need major reforms to oversight and a thorough review of the legal framework to keep up with changing technology.”


EE UU y Reino Unido espiaron a Israel, la UE, la ONU y Médicos del Mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU y Reino Unido espiaron a Israel, la UE, la ONU y Médicos del Mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

Snowden en 2013. / The Guardian (AFP)

Documentos secretos revelan que los servicios secretos británicos, GCHQ, y estadounidenses, NSA, tenían más de 1.000 objetivos de vigilancia en los últimos años. Entre ellos está la oficina de un primer ministro israelí, responsables de organizaciones internacionales de ayuda humanitaria, compañías energéticas y el comisario europeo de la Competencia, el español Joaquín Almunia, involucrado en batallas antimonopolio con empresas tecnológicas estadounidenses como Google, Microsoft o Intel, según revelan documentos secretos del más alto nivel. Las instalaciones del Gobierno alemán en todo el mundo también han sido sometidas a un seguimiento especial. Las operaciones se llevaron a cabo entre 2008 y 2011.

Los documentos muestran cómo el GCHQ, en colaboración con la NSA, vigiló a organizaciones como el Programa de Desarrollo de las Naciones Unidas, la agencia de la ONU para la infancia, Unicef e incluso a Médicos del Mundo, una organización francesa que proporciona a los médicos y voluntarios médicos a las zonas de conflicto. Leigh Daynes, director ejecutivo de la organización en Reino Unido, ha respondido a las noticias sobre la vigilancia afirmando que “no hay absolutamente ninguna razón para que nuestras operaciones sean espiadas”.


Edward Snowden has started a global debate. So why the silence in Britain? | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | The Guardian

Edward Snowden has started a global debate. So why the silence in Britain? | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | The Guardian.

We’re subject to huge unwarranted surveillance – but Westminster’s useful idiots are more likely to sanction than criticise it

Sean Connery in Goldfinger

Perhaps this trust in the authority of the state ‘is embedded in the class system, aided by the vague glamour of James Bond’. Photograph: Cine Text/Allstar/Sportsphoto

The Brazilian president cancels a state visit to Washington. The German justice minister talks of “a Hollywood nightmare“. His chancellor, Angela Merkel, ponders offering Edward Snowden asylum. The EU may even end the “safe harbour” directive which would force US-based computer servers to relocate to European regulation. Russians and Chinese, so often accused of cyber-espionage, hop with glee.

In response, an embarrassed Barack Obama pleads for debate and a review of the Patriot Acts. Al Gore refers to the Snowden revelations as “obscenely outrageous“. The rightwing John McCain declares a review “entirely appropriate“. The Senate holds public hearings and summons security chiefs, who squirm like mafia bosses on the run. America’s once dominant internet giants, with 80% of the globe under their sway, now face “Balkanised” regulation round the world as nation states seek to repatriate digital sovereignty.

And in Britain? Nothing. From parliament, the courts, and most of the media, nothing. Snowden, the most significant whistleblower of modern times, briefly amused London when he turned scarlet pimpernel in the summer; then the capital was intrigued when David Miranda was seized by Heathrow police on bogus “terrorism” charges. But the British establishment cannot get excited. It hates whistleblowers, regarding them as not proper chaps.