El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador

Las grandes empresas tecnológicas como Google, Facebook y Amazon actúan prácticamente como monopolios. Así lo considera el académico Jonathan Taplin, quien advierte de los riesgos de prolongar esta situación, también para la democracia. BBC Mundo habló con él.

Fuente: El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador


Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian

one response to his letter is to think it’s inspiring, touching, even, that there’s a billionaire out there who wants to build an “infrastructure”, a word he uses 24 times, that “prevents harm, helps during crises and rebuilds afterwards”.But here’s another response: where does that power end? Who holds it to account? What are the limits on it? Because the answer is there are none. Facebook’s power and dominance, its knowledge of every aspect of its users’ intimate lives, its ability to manipulate their – our – world view, its limitless ability to generate cash, is already beyond the reach of any government.

Fuente: Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian


The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian

The social media tycoon’s 5,700-word post about the ‘global community’ stokes rumours that another billionaire businessman is planning to run for president

Fuente: The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian


Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian

A party that favours direct democracy, complete government transparency, decriminalising drugs and offering asylum to Edward Snowden could form the next government in Iceland after the country goes to the polls on Saturday.

Fuente: Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian

The last time the mayor of Cupertino walked into Apple – the largest company in his small Californian town and, it so happens, the most valuable company in the world – he hoped to have a meeting to talk about traffic congestion.Barry Chang barely made it into the lobby when Apple’s security team surrounded and escorted him off the property.

Fuente: Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian


Google's Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian

Human development is too important, too complex, and too culturally diverse to be left to profit-driven companies acting in their own interests

Fuente: Google’s Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian


Gates, Kutcher y Branson, unidos para cambiar el mundo | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Gates, Kutcher y Branson, unidos para cambiar el mundo | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

La plataforma de ciberactivismo Change.org recibe financiación por 25 millones de dólares

Oficinas de change.org en San Francisco. / ROSA J.C.

En un año han pasado de 35 millones de usuarios registrados a más de 80 en 196 países. El nivel de peticiones que consiguen su finalidad ya alcanza una hora diaria. Change.org considera que este ha sido su mejor aval para conseguir una ronda de financiación de 25 millones de dólares (unos 20 millones de euros). No es una cifra tan abultada como las que suelen airean Uber o las start-ups de moda, pero la plataforma de ciberactivismo sí puede presumir de famosos e históricos del mundo de la tecnología entre los que brindan apoyo económico.

Pocas empresas pueden presumir de contar entre sus inversores a los fundadores de LinkedIn, Twitter, Yahoo!, Microsoft, Virgin y el Huffington Post, pero sí es el caso de Change.org. En la última ronda de financiación de la plataforma han entrado Reid Hoffman, Evan Williams, Jerry Yang, Bill Gates, Bill Gates y Arianna Huffington. Ashton Kutcher, al que no le parecía tan mala idea que Uber planease espiar a periodistas, también está entre los que han aportado fondos. Más allá del mundo tecnológico, el financiero también ha mostrado su apoyo. Destacan nombres como el de Nicolas Berggruen o Joe Lonsdale del fondo Palantir, así como Sam Altman, presidente de la incubadora de start-ups de moda en Silicon Valley, Y Combinator.

Jennifer Dulski, presidenta del servicio, considera que este apoyo obedece al impacto que provocan en el mundo real: “No queremos un grupo de inversores capitalistas, sino personas relevantes que apoyan nuestra visión y nos ayudan con su experiencia”. Sin embargo, no son una ONG, tampoco una empresa sin ánimo de lucro. “Nos enmarcamos dentro de lo que se denomina ‘el bien social’. Somos una empresa que busca hacer el bien, hacer negocios con un fondo ético. El dinero que ganamos revierte en la plataforma. Nuestra intención es ser un ejemplo y que otras personas que quieran empezar un negocio vean que se puede conseguir inversión y hacer el bien. Ojalá sigan esta senda los emprendedores del mañana”, se ilusiona.


Julian Assange on Snowden, disliking Google, and his “inevitable” freedom | Ars Technica

Julian Assange on Snowden, disliking Google, and his “inevitable” freedom | Ars Technica.

WikiLeaks man talks with Ars—new book may reveal more about him than its subject.

It would be too much to say that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange feels optimistic. He’s been holed up in the Ecuadorean embassy in London for more than two years now, with cameras and police—”a £3 million surveillance operation,” he calls it—just meters away.

“There’s a sense of inevitability now,” Assange said when we asked if his situation might change.

Assange: “The situation is clarifying politically and legally.”

Ars: “I just want to be clear on this point—are you saying you’re hopeful you’ll be free soon?”

Assange: “I wouldn’t say hopeful. I would say it’s inevitable. It’s inevitable that we will win the diplomatic standoff we’re in now.”

It’s getting late in London, where Assange is doing a barrage of press interviews on the eve of his new book, When Google Met Wikileaks (it goes on sale in the US later this week). We called at the agreed upon time, and a man who didn’t identify himself answered the number, which was for a London cell phone. He said call back in five minutes, and only then was the phone finally handed to Assange.

We’re supposed to focus on the book. But first, we want to know what life trapped in the embassy involves—where does he eat, sleep, do laundry? What is the room he’s in now like?

“For security reasons, I can’t tell you which sections of the embassy I utilize,” he said. “As to the rest, in a way, it’s a perfectly normal situation. In another way, it’s one of the most abnormal, unusual situations that someone can find themselves in.”

Assange ushered WikiLeaks through several massive leaks of secret US government reports and a tumultuous relationship with some prominent newspapers. first came the disclosure of hundreds of thousands of military reports on the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, then a leak of more than 250,000 diplomatic cables from the State Department.

He sought asylum from Ecuador when he was on the verge of being extradited to Sweden to face sexual-assault charges in that nation. If he leaves the embassy, he’ll be arrested, although it isn’t clear where he’ll be sent first. It’s widely assumed the US has an ongoing investigation into Assange over the leaks.

Asked about what his future outside the embassy walls might look like, he stays focused on the legal battles ahead. “We have a lot of dominos to knock over,” he said. “There are three or four different legal cases going on, and technical means to obstruct the asylum.”

He knows his travel will always be circumscribed to a degree, but Assange seems comfortable with that. He’s cognizant of the parallels between his situation and that of Edward Snowden.

“He has freedom of movement,” Assange acknowledged. “But his freedom of movement excludes a number of countries which can be pressured by the US, and that’s also true for me.”

His voice sounded scratchy as he spoke to Ars about how Google and its chairman Eric Schmidt were at the “center of American power,” pushing an “aggressive new ideology.” In the background, another phone started ringing. Assange wasn’t distracted. Half prisoner, half professor, he kept talking in the same slow cadence, with an insistent and didactic focus on making his point.