The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian

The social media tycoon’s 5,700-word post about the ‘global community’ stokes rumours that another billionaire businessman is planning to run for president

Fuente: The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian


Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.

It’s plausible, and in my opinion likely, that hackers under orders from the Russian government were responsible for the DNC and Podesta hacks in order to influence the U.S. election in favor of Donald Trump. But the Grizzly Steppe report fails to adequately back up this claim. My research, for example, shows that much of the evidence presented is evidence of nothing at all.

Fuente: The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs

The phrase “Fake News” has exploded in usage since the election, but the term is similar to other malleable political labels such as “terrorism” and “hate speech”; because the phrase lacks any clear definition, it is essentially useless except as an instrument of propaganda and censorship. The most important fact to realize about this new term: Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Fuente: A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs


Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian

It is crucial for a resilient democracy that we better understand how Google and Facebook are changing the way we think, interact and behave

Fuente: Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian


A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The study found that over the last three months of the election campaign, 20 top-performing false election stories from hoax sites and hyper-partisan blogs generated 8,711,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook, whereas the 20 best-performing election stories from 19 major news websites generated a total of 7,367,000 shares, reactions and comments. In other words, if you run a social networking site, fake news is good for business, even if it’s bad for democracy.

Fuente: A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador

Y pese a que la prensa mayoritaria lo negaba en forma maniaca, los correos filtrados por Wikileaks eran viralizados por las redes sociales, dando cuenta de una serie de situaciones como las siguientes: cerca de la mitad de las personas que lograron tener acceso a Hillary Clinton mientras era Secretaria de Estado, habían hecho, en los días previos, importantes donaciones a la Fundación Clinton (pay to play); su jefe de campaña era al mismo tiempo lobbista de los gobiernos de Arabia Saudita y Qatar (acusados de ser financistas de ISIS), para los cuales consiguió millonarias ventas de armas (durante el periodo en que Clinton fue Secretaria de Estado las exportaciones de armas duplicaron a las realizadas en tiempos de Bush).

Fuente: La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


Google Maps Palestine row: why neutrality in tech is an impossible dream | Leigh Alexander | Technology | The Guardian

Just as there is no single, standardised world map, our digital maps take various forms – and it matters who is drawing them and how they’re drawn

Fuente: Google Maps Palestine row: why neutrality in tech is an impossible dream | Leigh Alexander | Technology | The Guardian


Andrés Navarro reconoce haber hecho aportes irregulares: “Es un cacho darles plata a los políticos, a no ser que quieras un favor” – El Mostrador

Andrés Navarro reconoce haber hecho aportes irregulares: “Es un cacho darles plata a los políticos, a no ser que quieras un favor” – El Mostrador.

El empresario admitió haber entregado recursos a campañas por “afinidad ideológica” y “confianza” en algunas personas desde el plebiscito de 1988 hasta 1997, casi siempre pagando servicios de publicidad o imprenta, los cuales cargaba como gastos a sociedades personales para descontar impuestos. “Por suerte están prescritas”, reconoció.

andres-navarro1

El empresario Andrés Navarro, dueño de la compañía de servicios tecnológicos Sonda y actualmente candidato a presidir la Sociedad de Fomento Fabril (Sofofa), ha estado vinculado como simpatizante histórico a la DC, es de los amigos más cercanos de Sebastián Piñera y nunca ha escondido sus preferencias políticas, como respecto a Ricardo Lagos y, últimamente, la buena opinión que tiene sobre Andrés Velasco.

Esta vez Navarro reconoció su papel activo como donante desde el plebiscito que sacó a Pinochet en 1988 hasta 1997, cuando –según dice– “se hizo evidente” que apoyaba al ex Presidente Ricado Lagos.

En entrevista con Radio Duna, Navarro aclaró que “de todos los políticos que conozco, diputados, senadores, etcétera, no sé de ninguno que no haya ido a ver a un empresario amigo para pedirle apoyo económico para su campaña”. Y como empresario opinó que “es un cacho esto de darles plata a los políticos, a no ser que tengas una intencionalidad específica o quieras conseguir un favor”. En este sentido, aclaró que “en mi caso yo lo hice y nunca pedí algún favor, lo hice más por afinidad ideológica, por personas a las que les tenía confianza”, aseguró.

El dueño y fundador de Sonda recordó que su vínculo como aportante a campañas comenzó en el plebiscito de 1988, en su condición de miembro del comando de empresarios por el NO. “Luego, desde 1990 hasta 1997, hice aportes a campañas políticas (…) normalmente lo hice pagando la confección de propaganda a través de empresas de publicidad o de imprentas”, afirmó.

En este sentido, Navarro admitió que estos aportes los hizo desde sus sociedades personales, donde no estaba asociado con otras personas y, además, reconoció que a través de ellos descontaba impuestos. “[Estas facturas] las tiraba a gastos… es una irregularidad, pero afortunadamente están todas prescritas”, confidenció.