La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador

En la economía de Internet, Asia suele ser la precursora de nuevos servicios tales como aplicaciones de mensajería o pagos móviles. Ahora ha avanzado con una nueva tendencia: más gente que en otras partes del mundo ha instalado en sus teléfonos móviles software para bloquear la publicidad de internet.

Fuente: La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador


Fightback against internet giants’ stranglehold on personal data starts here | Technology | The Guardian

Fightback against internet giants’ stranglehold on personal data starts here | Technology | The Guardian.

Data transactions have been weighted heavily in favour of the internet companies.
 Data transactions have been weighted heavily in favour of the internet companies. Photograph: Maksim Kabakou/Alamy

Whenever regulators gather to discuss market failures, the cliche “level playing field” eventually surfaces. When regulators finally get around to thinking about what happens in the online world, especially in the area of personal data, then they will have to come to terms with the fact that the playing field is not just tilted in favour of the online giants, but is as vertical as that rockface in Yosemite that two Americans have finally managed to free climb.

The mechanism for rotating the playing field is our old friend, the terms and conditions agreement, usually called the “end user licence agreement” (EULA) in cyberspace. This invariably consists of three coats of prime legal verbiage distributed over 32 pages, which basically comes down to this: “If you want to do business with us, then you will do it entirely on our terms; click here to agree, otherwise go screw yourself. Oh, and by the way, all of your personal data revealed in your interactions with us belongs to us.”

The strange thing is that this formula applies regardless of whether you are actually trying to purchase something from the author of the EULA or merely trying to avail yourself of its “free” services.

When the history of this period comes to be written, our great-grandchildren will marvel at the fact that billions of apparently sane individuals passively accepted this grotesquely asymmetrical deal. (They may also wonder why our governments have shown so little interest in the matter.) And future historians, diligently hunting through digital archives, will discover that there were only a few voices crying in the wilderness at the time.