The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail

The story of Edward Snowden’s disclosure of NSA secrets to the press has been told and retold in books, films, and countless articles. Left unreported has been the quiet role of two journalists who literally had Snowden material mailed to them in a cardboard box.

Fuente: The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail


From sweaters to suits: the evolution of Silicon Valley CEO style | Fashion | The Guardian

Snapchat’s Evan Spiegel wore a sharp suit for his company’s IPO – a far cry from the relaxed look we’ve come to expect from tech entrepreneurs

Fuente: From sweaters to suits: the evolution of Silicon Valley CEO style | Fashion | The Guardian


Todas las cosas buenas eventualmente terminan | Manzana Mecánica

Todo llega a su fin. Algunas cosas antes de lo esperado, algunas otras más tarde. A veces el fin de las cosas llega de una forma invisible, cuando deja de ocupar espacio en nuestras mentes, en nuestro tiempo, porque nuestras vidas se han movido vertiginosamente en direcciones que hasta hace poco, no habríamos si quiera imaginado. Es este, en mi opinión, el caso de Manzana Mecánica.

Fuente: Todas las cosas buenas eventualmente terminan | Manzana Mecánica


Facebook backs down from ‘napalm girl’ censorship and reinstates photo | Technology | The Guardian

“After hearing from our community, we looked again at how our Community Standards were applied in this case. An image of a naked child would normally be presumed to violate our Community Standards, and in some countries might even qualify as child pornography. In this case, we recognize the history and global importance of this image in documenting a particular moment in time.”

Fuente: Facebook backs down from ‘napalm girl’ censorship and reinstates photo | Technology | The Guardian


“El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”

“La gestión de los Papeles de Panamá es un ataque a nuestro modelo”, asegura el fundador de Wikileaks, muy crítico con el Consorcio Internacional de Periodistas de Investigación que ha publicado esta última gran filtración”Los medios establecidos tienen que limitarse constantemente bajo los poderes del establishment, los poderes del Estado al que pertenecen”, dice Assange en esta entrevista con eldiario.es en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres

Fuente: “El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”


‘Crypto Wars’ timeline: A history of the new encryption debate

Encryption is finally mainstream.Government officials and technologists have been debating since the early 1990s whether to limit the strength of encryption to help the law-enforcement and intelligence communities monitor suspects’ communications. But until early 2016, this was a mostly esoteric fight, relegated to academic conferences, security agencies’ C-suites, and the back rooms of Capitol Hill.Everything changed in mid-February, when President Barack Obama’s Justice Department, investigating the terrorists who carried out the San Bernardino, California, shooting, asked a federal judge to force Apple to help the Federal Bureau of Investigation unlock one attacker’s iPhone.What followed was an unexpectedly rancorous and unprecedentedly public fight over how far the government should go to pierce and degrade commercial security technology in its quest to protect Americans from terrorism.

Fuente: ‘Crypto Wars’ timeline: A history of the new encryption debate


MySpace – what went wrong: ‘The site was a massive spaghetti-ball mess’ | Technology | The Guardian

MySpace – what went wrong: ‘The site was a massive spaghetti-ball mess’ | Technology | The Guardian.

MySpace: 'They knew they were about to lose to Facebook. They knew that the end was near. They could smell it'MySpace: ‘They knew they were about to lose to Facebook. They knew that the end was near. They could smell it’ Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In 2015, Sean Percival is a partner at Silicon Valley seed accelerator 500 Startups, but from 2009 to 2011, he was working at MySpace as its vice president of online marketing – just as the social network lost its crown to Facebook.

In a speech at the By:Larm conference in Oslo this week, Percival gave an insider’s view of what went wrong at MySpace, from the “massive spaghetti-ball mess” of its website and the “politics, greed” of parent company News Corporation to a doomed attempt to acquire music streaming service Spotify.

His talk was aimed at startups looking to learn the lessons from MySpace’s decline, but it seemed as relevant for the largest internet companies today, such as Facebook, as they seek to avoid a similar fate.


Twitter and Instagram users can learn a lot from a 1920s journalist | Comment is free | The Guardian

Twitter and Instagram users can learn a lot from a 1920s journalist | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Social media give us the power to create a real-time portrait of our age, just as pioneering journalist Ben Hecht documented his own era

Ben Hecht On Horseback
Chicago Daily News reporter Ben Hecht on horseback in 1915 … we can each create a Chicago of the mind as real as the one Hecht created in print. Photograph: Chicago History Museum/Getty

Chicago, late afternoon in 1921. Outside, the pavements are slick with rain and in the newsroom, amid cigar smoke, they can feel the rumble as the Chicago Daily News rolls off the press. Enter reporter Ben Hecht, with a new idea. He will write a daily sketch of the city’s life, modelled on the stories of Scheherazade and entitled 1001 Afternoons in Chicago. Hecht is hired, and from then on, throughout the 1920s, not a day goes by without a miniature masterpiece of reportage.

By the time he was finished, and had gone to Broadway to write The Front Page, Hecht had documented in detail the everyday world in which all fictional heroes of film noir begin their adventures. It is a world of cardsharps, condemned men, sex workers, Yiddish tailors and Chinese laundrymen. Hecht’s description of one gives a flavour of the way he wrote: “There is something immaculate about Sing Lee. Sing Lee has been ironing out collars and shirts for 35 years. And 35 years have been ironing Sing Lee out.” But beyond the individuals, the main character for Hecht is always Chicago: its windows always rain-spattered, its streets always dark, its coffee always laced with bootlegged brandy.

Hecht was part of an international cadre of reporters who all had a similar idea at the same time: to make newswriting literary, so it could sustain greater length, pack a bigger emotional punch, but to use demotic language for a mass audience. They called it “reportage” – which is only French for reporting, but denotes its character as literary non-fiction.

Thanks to Hecht’s reportage, we possess, 90 years on, a granular social history of the time, one that the people of Chicago were seeing written in real time. While the news pages told them that a judge had released some woman charged with prostitution, Hecht tells us how her eyes pleaded for leniency – “a dog takes a kick like this with eyes like these” – and how, after release, she halted by a drugstore window to reapply her makeup.

Ben Hecht in 1918
The writer Ben Hecht in 1918 … we should be claiming our right to be lyrical and profound on social media. Photograph: Chicago History Museum/Getty

In a brilliant piece, Hecht catches the radical trade union leader Big Bill Haywood watching a burlesque show in a supposed last week of freedom prior to starting a 20-year jail sentence for sedition. A few days later, Haywood escaped to Russia, but Hecht uses this event to take us on a tour of lowlife Chicago through the eyes of a man who loves it, and will never see it again.

Today, technology has given all of us the power to be our own version of Ben Hecht. Amid the trolling and the cat pictures and the clickbait, there are still enough real things said on Twitter, and beautiful images posted on Instagram or Tumblr, to make them function as real-time journals of the public space we inhabit.

Today’s Chinese laundry worker can write his own story; so can the sex worker in the dock. Plus there are millions of us posting cityscapes and candid street photography every second. Nobody can follow it all: but by following a fraction of it we each create a Chicago of the mind just as real as the one Hecht created in newsprint.


Entrevista digital con Andreu Veà en EL PAÍS

Entrevista digital con Andreu Veà en EL PAÍS.


Andreu Veà

Andreu Veà

Autor del libro ‘Cómo creamos Internet’

MARTES, 03 DE DICIEMBRE DE 2013

El catalán Andreu Veà, presidente de la Internet Society en España, ha escrito ‘Cómo creamos Internet’, un libro sobre los pioneros de la Red.
Más entrevistas digitales

Los internautas preguntan a Andreu Veà

Manuel R.

1. 03/12/2013 – 13:04h.

¿En qué consiste la Internet Society?

Para exponerlo en pocas líneas, ISOC (la manera en que llamamos coloquialmente a la organización social que Vint Cerf creó en 1992) y que se organiza por Capítulos Locales, es parecido a National Geographic como una organización non-profit pero monográfica de Internet. su misión principal (además de la formación y de la fijación de stándares: tiene por debajo a la IETF) es la de MANTENER una única red abierta e interoperable a nivel mundial. Resistiendo el embite de grandes corporaciones o de gobiernos totalitarios (o no) que quieren “particularizarla” y cambiar sus reglas que tan bien han funcionado y funcionan. Adherirse a ella y en concreto al capítulo español es GRATUITO (rellenando un formulario www.isoc.org y seleccionando ISOC-ES como capítulo local. respondo aquí como Presidente Ejecutivo de esta organización en España, recién elegido para los próximos 4 años (2013-2017). PD: para ser socio de pleno con derecho a voto existe la modalidad de pago (12€ al año)