The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail

The story of Edward Snowden’s disclosure of NSA secrets to the press has been told and retold in books, films, and countless articles. Left unreported has been the quiet role of two journalists who literally had Snowden material mailed to them in a cardboard box.

Fuente: The Strangers Who Got Snowden’s Secrets in the Mail


Malware Attacks Used by the U.S. Government Retain Potency for Many Years, New Evidence Indicates

A new report from Rand Corp. may help shed light on the government’s arsenal of malicious software, including the size of its stockpile of so-called “zero days” — hacks that hit undisclosed vulnerabilities in computers, smartphones, and other digital devices.The report also provides evidence that such vulnerabilities are long lasting. The findings are of particular interest because not much is known about the U.S. government’s controversial use of zero days.

Fuente: Malware Attacks Used by the U.S. Government Retain Potency for Many Years, New Evidence Indicates


Defender los derechos humanos en el entorno tecnológico. Nuestra apuesta desde América Latina | Derechos Digitales

Derechos Digitales comienza hoy una nueva etapa de trabajo en defensa de los derechos fundamentales en América Latina. Nuestro camino se dirige a la identificación de un entorno cambiante para los usuarios, los gobiernos y la sociedad civil en general.

Fuente: Defender los derechos humanos en el entorno tecnológico. Nuestra apuesta desde América Latina | Derechos Digitales


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


ACLU Wants 23 Secret Surveillance Laws Made Public

“The people of this country can’t hold the government accountable for its surveillance activities unless they know what our laws allow,” said Patrick Toomey, a staff attorney with the ACLU’s National Security Project. “These secret court opinions define the limits of the government’s spying powers. Their disclosure is essential for meaningful public oversight in our democracy.”

Fuente: ACLU Wants 23 Secret Surveillance Laws Made Public


Europe’s Top Human Rights Court Will Consider Legality of Surveillance Exposed by Edward Snowden

Ten organizations – including Privacy International, the American Civil Liberties Union, and Amnesty International – are taking up the landmark case against the U.K. government in the European Court of Human Rights (pictured above). In a 115-page complaint released on Thursday, the groups allege that “blanket and indiscriminate” surveillance operations carried out by British spy agencies in collaboration with their U.S. counterparts violate privacy and freedom of expression rights.

Fuente: Europe’s Top Human Rights Court Will Consider Legality of Surveillance Exposed by Edward Snowden


Switzerland votes in favour of greater surveillance | World news | The Guardian

Rights group Amnesty International said it regretted Sunday’s result, arguing that the new law would allow “disproportionate” levels of surveillance and that it posed “a threat to freedom of expression”.

Fuente: Switzerland votes in favour of greater surveillance | World news | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian

Bernie Sanders, Daniel Ellsberg, former members of the NSA and more weigh in on whether Obama should grant clemency to the divisive whistleblower

Fuente: ‘Edward Snowden did this country a great service. Let him come home’ | US news | The Guardian


Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden has set out the case for Barack Obama granting him a pardon before the US president leaves office in January, arguing that the disclosure of the scale of surveillance by US and British intelligence agencies was not only morally right but had left citizens better off.

Fuente: Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon | US news | The Guardian


Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia | Derechos Digitales

Con mucho orgullo y de manera oficial, Derechos Digitales presenta hoy la Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia, un conjunto de herramientas y consejos prácticos que te ayudarán a resguardar mejor tu información personal y la de otros. Pareciera ser que hoy más que nunca es necesario proteger nuestros datos, pues siempre hay alguien intentando acceder a ellos: empresas privadas, cibercriminales y el mismo Estado.

Fuente: Amistosa Caja Anti Vigilancia | Derechos Digitales


How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide

As part of an ongoing effort to “exploit medical intelligence,” the National Security Agency teamed up with the military-focused Defense Intelligence Agency to extract “medical SIGINT” from the intercepted communications of nonprofit groups starting in the early 2000s, a top-secret document shows.

Fuente: How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide


German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian

Checking smartphones of those without passports among measures announced by the interior minister, Thomas de Maizière

Fuente: German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian


Tor Project, a Digital Privacy Group, Reboots With New Board – The New York Times

The Tor Project, a nonprofit digital privacy group, on Wednesday replaced its board with a new slate of directors as part of a larger shake-up after allegations of sexual misconduct by a prominent employee.

Fuente: Tor Project, a Digital Privacy Group, Reboots With New Board – The New York Times


Living Under Digital Surveillance: Human Rights Defender Perceptions and Experiences | Front Line Defenders

In November 2015, at the Eighth Dublin Platform for Human Rights Defenders, Front Line Defenders (FLD) asked human rights defenders (HRDs) from across Asia, Africa, Americas, Europe and the Middle East/North Africa to share experiences of living under digital surveillance and the perceived impact this has on their work and lives.

Fuente: Living Under Digital Surveillance: Human Rights Defender Perceptions and Experiences | Front Line Defenders


Surveillance as a tool for racism | TechCrunch

I’d missed the entire reason privacy isn’t just a concern for those who logged into Ashley Madison or researched something more nefarious than the difference between starches. I missed that it should matter to me because there are people for whom it has to matter, by virtue of their socioeconomic or racial status. And while I have the luxury, by virtue of my own socioeconomic status and race, of ignoring reality and letting this not be my problem, that’s not how wrongs are righted.I finally saw surveillance not as something mildly offensive to my own sense of civil liberties, but as a tool of institutional racism. It suddenly became clear to me — and I’m so embarrassed it didn’t prior — that the people most stripped of their privacy rights in this surveillance age are the people who are already vulnerable.

Fuente: Surveillance as a tool for racism | TechCrunch


With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal

Although the police in Cairo sealed off parts of the Egyptian capital where protests scheduled on Facebook were to have taken place on Monday, opposition activists managed to stage brief rallies that resembled flash mobs, calling for an end to military rule and the cancellation of a deal to surrender two islands to Saudi Arabia.The fact that Facebook is now so closely monitored by the security forces prompted one leading activist to offer an online tutorial in how to use a new tool, the encrypted messaging app Signal, to help protesters find each other on the city’s streets, and stay one step ahead of the authorities.

Fuente: With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal


The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard

Back in July of last year, the controversial government spying and hacking tool seller Hacking Team was hacked itself by an outside attacker. The breach made headlines worldwide, but no one knew much about the perpetrator or how he did it.That mystery has finally been revealed.

Fuente: The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard


Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores

Los refugiados no tienen derechos. De ahí se deriva que sus teléfonos pueden ser hackeados y sus ordenadores también. Al parecer, esto es lo que ha hecho -legalmente y según The Observer – los funcionarios de la oficina de inmigración británica. En 2013 recibieron poderes para hackear los dispositivos electrónicos de todos los refugiados y peticionarios de asilo que considerasen necesario. Y lo consideran.

Fuente: Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores


Fundación Karisma | ¿Qué hay de nuevo en el estado de la vigilancia masiva en Colombia?

The State of Surveillance es un estudio dirigido por Privacy International, que aborda temas como la privacidad y la vigilancia a nivel mundial y cuenta con 13 informes de diferentes países, que se actualizan dos veces al año. Con Fundación Karisma participamos de la creación del capítulo para Colombia que en este mes de marzo presenta la actualización de “Un Estado en la sombra: vigilancia y orden público en Colombia”

Fuente: Fundación Karisma | ¿Qué hay de nuevo en el estado de la vigilancia masiva en Colombia?


Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post

A while back, we noted a report showing that the “sneak-and-peek” provision of the Patriot Act that was alleged to be used only in national security and terrorism investigations has overwhelmingly been used in narcotics cases. Now the New York Times reports that National Security Agency data will be shared with other intelligence agencies like the FBI without first applying any screens for privacy.

Fuente: Surprise! NSA data will soon routinely be used for domestic policing that has nothing to do with terrorism – The Washington Post


Five Big Unanswered Questions About NSA’s Worldwide Spying

Nearly three years after NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden gave journalists his trove of documents on the intelligence community’s broad and powerful surveillance regime, the public is still missing some crucial, basic facts about how the operations work.Surveillance researchers and privacy advocates published a report on Wednesday outlining what we do know, thanks to the period of discovery post-Snowden — and the overwhelming amount of things we don’t.

Fuente: Five Big Unanswered Questions About NSA’s Worldwide Spying


Cinco claves sobre el fallo que pone fin a los globos de vigilancia – Derechos Digitales

El fallo establece que el funcionamiento de los globos es ilegal y afectan la vida privada. Además argumenta que la seguridad no es justificación para intromisión en la intimidad y llama la atención sobre la falta de regulación expresa sobre la videovigilancia en Chile.

Fuente: Cinco claves sobre el fallo que pone fin a los globos de vigilancia – Derechos Digitales


Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago prohíbe el funcionamiento de los globos de vigilancia en Las Condes y Lo Barnechea – Derechos Digitales

La tarde de hoy, la Segunda Sala de la Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago ha acogido el recurso de protección interpuesto contra los globos de vigilancia que, desde agosto de 2015, flotan sobre las comunas de Las Condes y Lo Barnechea. Por decisión unánime, la Corte ha decretado el cese inmediato de los planes de vigilancia comunal, argumentando que atentan contra el derecho a la vida privada y la inviolabilidad del hogar, garantizado en el artículo 19 de la Constitución, numerales 4 y 5.

Fuente: Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago prohíbe el funcionamiento de los globos de vigilancia en Las Condes y Lo Barnechea – Derechos Digitales


EFF, ACLU, and Amnesty International voice support for Apple in FBI battle | The Verge

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and Amnesty International have come out in support of Apple, after the company said it would contest a judge’s order to unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters.

Fuente: EFF, ACLU, and Amnesty International voice support for Apple in FBI battle | The Verge


¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales

A mediados de octubre de 2015, la prensa chilena daba cuenta de la instalación de dos globos aerostáticos en la comuna de Las Condes y uno en Lo Barnechea, supuestamente destinados a incrementar los niveles de seguridad de los habitantes de ambos municipios y a colaborar en la gestión del tránsito de sus calles.

Se trata de tecnología de origen militar: potentes cámaras que flotan sobre las comunas, equipadas con lentes de gran alcance, capaces de efectuar seguimientos en un radio de 3 kilómetros, operadas por una empresa privada y no por funcionarios públicos.

Fuente: ¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales

A mediados de octubre de 2015, la prensa chilena daba cuenta de la instalación de dos globos aerostáticos en la comuna de Las Condes y uno en Lo Barnechea, supuestamente destinados a incrementar los niveles de seguridad de los habitantes de ambos municipios y a colaborar en la gestión del tránsito de sus calles.

Se trata de tecnología de origen militar: potentes cámaras que flotan sobre las comunas, equipadas con lentes de gran alcance, capaces de efectuar seguimientos en un radio de 3 kilómetros, operadas por una empresa privada y no por funcionarios públicos.

Fuente: ¿Tienen las municipalidades más facultades que el Ministerio Público? – Derechos Digitales


Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian

Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian.

police gangs surveillance Stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional in 2013. Illustration: Rob Dobi

Taylonn Murphy is sitting in a Harlem beauty salon after hours. Leaning back in his chair and with a calm demeanor, he is talking about keeping young local people out of harm’s way.

Every now and then though, as he speaks, his voice breaks.

In September 2011, his daughter Tayshana, 18, a local basketball superstar and resident of West Harlem’s Grant Houses, was shot dead by two residents of Manhattanville Houses. The killing was described as the result of a rivalry between the two housing projects that dates back decades.

Almost three years after his daughter’s death, on 4 June 2014, helicopters hovered overhead as the first rays of sunlight hit the concrete. At least 400 New York police officers in military gear raided both housing projects, with indictments for the arrest of 103 people.

Starting in January 2010, the community’s children and young adults had been closely watched by police officers – both online and off. The investigation had involved listening in to 40,000 calls from correctional facilities, watching hours of surveillance video, and reviewing over 1m online social media pages.

For Murphy, the revelation of these details was choking: the NYPD had been attentively surveilling both communities for over one and a half years before his daughter was murdered, patiently waiting and observing as the rivalry between crew members escalated.

Online surveillance: the new stop-and-frisk?

In 2013, stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional by a federal judge for its use of racial profiling. Since then, logged instances have dropped from an astonishing 685,000 in 2011 to just 46,000 in 2014. But celebrations may be premature, with local policing increasingly moving off the streets and migrating online.

In 2012, the NYPD declared a war on gangs across the city with Operation Crew Cut. The linchpin of the operation’s activities is the sweeping online surveillance of individuals as young as 10 years old deemed to be members of crews and gangs.

This move is being criticized by an increasing number of community members and legal scholars, who see it as an insidious way of justifying the monitoring of young men and boys of color in low-income communities.


The government will hide its surveillance programs. But they won't eliminate them | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | The Guardian

The government will hide its surveillance programs. But they won’t eliminate them | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | The Guardian.

 Wnsahen will the government stop listening in to our conversations? Photograph: age fotostock / Alamy/Alamy

Want to see how secrecy is corrosive to democracy? Look no further than a series of explosive investigations by various news organizations this week that show the government hiding surveillance programs purely to prevent a giant public backlash.

USA Today’s Brad Heath published a blockbuster story on Monday about the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) running a massive domestic spying operation parallel to the NSA’s that was tracking billions of international calls made by Americans. They kept it secret for more than two decades. According to the USA Today report, the spying program was not only used against alleged terrorist activity, but countless supposed drug crimes, as well as “to identify US suspects in a wide range of other investigations”. And they collected information on millions of completely innocent Americans along the way.

Heath’s story is awash with incredible detail and should be read in full, but one of the most interesting parts was buried near the end: the program was shut down by the Justice Department after the Snowden leaks, not because Snowden exposed the program, but because they knew that when the program eventually would leak, the government would have no arguments to defend it.

The justification they were using for the NSA’s program – that it was only being used against dangerous terrorists, not ordinary criminals – just wasn’t true with the DEA. The public would clearly be outraged by the twisted legal justification that radically re-interpreted US law in complete secrecy. “They couldn’t defend both programs”, a former Justice Department official told Heath. The piece also reveals that Attorney General Eric “didn’t think we should have that information” in the first place, which is interesting because Holder was one of the first Justice Department officials to approve the program during the Clinton administration. It’s nice he came to his senses, but if the program never risked going public, would he have felt the same?

There are many other surveillance programs the government is desperate to keep hidden. Consider Stingray devices, the mini fake cell phone towers that can vacuum up cell phone data of entire neighborhoods at the same time and which are increasingly being used by local cops all around the country. The Associated Press reported this week that the Baltimore police have used these controversial devices thousands of times in the course of ordinary investigations and have tried to hide how the devices are used from judges.

The lengths to which the FBI will go to keep these devices secret from the public is alarming. As a Guardian investigation detailed on Friday, the FBI makes local police that use them sign non-disclosure agreements, and goes as far as to direct them to dismiss charges against potential criminals if the phone surveillance will be exposed at trial (like is required by due process rights in the Fifth Amendment).


Editorial Aún Creemos en los Sueños ESPIONAJE – Inicio

Editorial Aún Creemos en los Sueños ESPIONAJE – Inicio.

ESPIONAJE

 

Todos fichados por internet, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, celulares…
Entrevista inédita de Ignacio Ramonet a Julian Assange

Espionaje a escala mundial
por Dan Schiller

Google nos espía e informa al gobierno de EE.UU.
Entrevista exclusiva a Julian Assange.
por Ignacio Ramonet

El espionaje a los internautas revoluciona la publicidad
por Marie Bénilde

Las grandes mentiras de Google y Microsoft
por Dan Schiller

Todos bajo control
por Ignacio Ramonet

La obsesión por la seguridad hace mutar la democracia
por Giorgio Agamben


After Arab Spring, Surveillance in Egypt Intensifies – The Intercept

After Arab Spring, Surveillance in Egypt Intensifies – The Intercept.

Featured photo - After Arab Spring, Surveillance in Egypt Intensifies

CAIRO — It’s been four years since a popular uprising known as the Arab Spring forced Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, and yet leading information activists say that government surveillance is getting worse, not better.

The establishment of the High Council for Cyber Crime by decree of the Prime Minister on Dec. 14 cemented control of already tightly constrained Internet activity in Egypt, according to Ramy Raoof, one of the founders of Motoon, a new organization that provides information security consulting to non-governmental organizations and private companies. “The whole idea of [the Cyber Crime Council] is to make repression clearer and organized for the state,” he says.

The High Council for Cyber Crime is headed by Atef Holmi, the minister of Communications and Information Technology, and brings together top officials from across the Egyptian government, including the Ministries of Interior and Defense. Its sweeping mandate is “to fight threats in cyberspace.”

In the past, divisions between competing state bodies, whether ministries or institutions like the military, impeded cooperation in spying on and cracking down on civilian opponents. “Within the security agencies, they don’t share much information,” Raoof says. “They might share what they know, but not how they know it.”

The announcement of the formation of the High Council for Cyber Crime is part of a broader government shift toward greater surveillance on opposition figures and activists, according to Raoof.


Memex, el buscador de DARPA que rastrea la Deep Web

Memex, el buscador de DARPA que rastrea la Deep Web.

La Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), que depende del Gobierno de EEUU, ha creado un buscador capaz de bucear en las profundidades de la Deep Web

Algunas autoridades estadounidenses ya están usando Memex para investigar delitos relativos al tráfico de personas

Iceberg - Wikipedia http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Iceberg_-_NOAA.jpg

Si internet fuera un iceberg, la Deep Web sería la parte oculta: se calcula que es mucho mayor que la Web visible

El término proviene de un artículo de 1945, publicado durante las últimas semanas de la II Guerra Mundial por el ingeniero y director de la U.S Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) Vannevar Bush. En él se describía Memex como una especie de invento electromecánico capaz de almacenar todos los libros, grabaciones y todo tipo de información con el fin de poder rescatarla a placer.

El ingenio no fue desarrollado, claro está, y hoy lo más parecido que hay son los buscadores de Internet. Pero estos se dejan una parte sustancial de la Red sin acceder, la Deep Web, que en 2013 saltó a los titulares de los medios por el caso Silk Road. La agencia gubernamental estadounidense DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Project Agency) ha desarrollado un buscador que puede llegar a todos estos sitios donde no llegan Google, Yahoo o Bing. Lo han llamado Memex.

Aunque en principio la idea de DARPA es que Memex también pueda usarse en el ámbito comercial, lo que significaría que cualquier usuario podría utilizarlo, por el momento son las autoridades estadounidenses las que operan con él. Desde enero de 2014 sirve para las investigaciones sobre tráfico de personas que lleva a cabo el fiscal del distrito de Manhattan.