Message to Pirates of the Caribbean hackers – piracy no longer pays | UK news | The Guardian

Hackers hoped Disney would pay up when they threatened to leak Dead Men Tell No Tales online – but have they scuppered the wrong vessel?

Fuente: Message to Pirates of the Caribbean hackers – piracy no longer pays | UK news | The Guardian


Teenage hackers motivated by morality not money, study finds | Technology | The Guardian

Young people attack computer networks to impress friends and challenge political system, crime research shows

Fuente: Teenage hackers motivated by morality not money, study finds | Technology | The Guardian


The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard

Back in July of last year, the controversial government spying and hacking tool seller Hacking Team was hacked itself by an outside attacker. The breach made headlines worldwide, but no one knew much about the perpetrator or how he did it.That mystery has finally been revealed.

Fuente: The Vigilante Who Hacked Hacking Team Explains How He Did It | Motherboard


Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores

Los refugiados no tienen derechos. De ahí se deriva que sus teléfonos pueden ser hackeados y sus ordenadores también. Al parecer, esto es lo que ha hecho -legalmente y según The Observer – los funcionarios de la oficina de inmigración británica. En 2013 recibieron poderes para hackear los dispositivos electrónicos de todos los refugiados y peticionarios de asilo que considerasen necesario. Y lo consideran.

Fuente: Reino Unido espía a los refugiados hackeando sus móviles y ordenadores


Anonymous collective declares ‘total war’ on Donald Trump, again | Technology | The Guardian

Hackers target ‘deeply disturbing’ presidential candidate and ask for support to dismantle his campaign and expose private details

Fuente: Anonymous collective declares ‘total war’ on Donald Trump, again | Technology | The Guardian


Court rulings threaten to upset defences against data breach claims – FT.com

In February, a Los Angeles hospital paid a bitcoin ransom equivalent to about $17,000 to retrieve its medical records after hackers attacked its network.While the records were soon restored, the attack raises the spectre of cyber criminals causing harm to consumers if a healthcare provider is, for example, unable to find out about a patient’s drug allergies in an emergency.

Fuente: Court rulings threaten to upset defences against data breach claims – FT.com


Workshop sobre "hardware hacking" con Nicolas Collins | Manzana Mecánica

Nicolás Collins, compositor y pionero de la experimentación con la electrónica y el sonido a nivel mundial, profesor del Departamento de Sonido de la Escuela de Bellas Artes de Chicago y Editor Chief de Leonardo Music Journal, estará en Chile para participar en dos festivales que se realizarán esta semana: Sonar+D (Congreso sobre música, creatividad y tecnología) y la novena versión de Tsonami, Festival Internacional de arte sonoro.

Fuente: Workshop sobre “hardware hacking” con Nicolas Collins | Manzana Mecánica


Hackers take down Lenovo website – FT.com

Hackers take down Lenovo website – FT.com.

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February 26, 2015 2:45 am

Hackers take down Lenovo website

 

A pedestrian walks past the Lenovo Group Ltd. flagship store on Qianmen Street in Beijing, China, on Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. Lenovo Chief Executive Officer Yang Yuanqing has expanded in computer servers and mobile phones, including the $2.91 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility, to help combat a shrinking personal-computer market. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

Lenovo’s website has been hacked, less than a week after the personal computer maker was forced to disable controversial software that left users of its laptops vulnerable to cyber attacks.

On Thursday, the group – the world’s largest PC manufacturer by unit sales – said that users trying to visit its website had been redirected to another site by hackers.Hacker collective Lizard Squad had claimed credit for the attack via Twitter, where it also posted internal Lenovo e-mails discussing Superfish, the advertising software that the PC maker disabled on its products last week.

Lizard Squad has previously claimed credit for cyber attacks on Sony’s PlayStation network and Microsoft’s Xbox Live network. On Thursday, it also boasted of an attack on Google’s Vietnamese website.

Lenovo said it had taken its website down and was also investigating “other aspects” of the attack.

Later on Thursday morning, visitors to lenovo.com on Thursday morning received a message stating: “The Lenovo site you are attempting to access is currently unavailable due to system maintenance.” It was restored on Thursday afternoon.

Last week, Lenovo acknowledged that its consumer division had sold laptops pre-installed with controversial advertising software called Superfish that potentially left its computers open to being hacked. It said it had stopped installing Superfish on new units in January and disabled the software on existing machines.

Computer experts had warned of a security hole in the software that hackers could exploit to eavesdrop on a user’s web-browsing behaviour.

 


Lenovo admits to software vulnerability – FT.com

Lenovo admits to software vulnerability – FT.com.

 

Last updated: February 19, 2015 7:00 pm

Lenovo admits to software vulnerability

 

Lenovo Group Ltd. signage is displayed near laptops in an arranged photograph at a Lenovo store in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong, China, on Friday, May 23, 2014. Lenovo, the world's largest maker of personal computers, reported a 25 percent jump in fourth-quarter profit as its desktop models and mobile devices gained global market share. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

Lenovo, the world’s largest computer manufacturer by unit sales, has been forced to disable controversial software that left users of its laptops vulnerable to hacking attacks.

The software Superfish, which was pre-installed on Lenovo’s devices, was billed as a free “visual search” tool. But Lenovo used it to inject adverts into web pages.

More controversially, however, computer experts have discovered that Superfish contains a major security hole that hackers can potentially exploit to eavesdrop on a user’s web-browsing behaviour.

Users have been raising concerns about Superfish on Lenovo’s own online forums since September, complaining that the software is putting additional advertising into web pages without their permission.

Computer manufacturers often pre-install so-called “adware” into their laptops and PCs in exchange for payment by the software makers, which in turn make money from advertisers.

Lenovo said its customers were given a choice about whether to use the product.

However, Graham Cluley, an independent security expert, said the way in which Lenovo had installed the adware was “cack-handed, and could be exploited by a malicious hacker to intercept the traffic of innocent parties”.

While there is no evidence that hackers have exploited the vulnerability, Mr Cluley said: “If you have Superfish on your computer you really can’t trust secure connections to sites any more.”

 


Aaron Swartz stood up for freedom and fairness – and was hounded to his death | Comment is free | The Guardian

Aaron Swartz stood up for freedom and fairness – and was hounded to his death | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Internet activist Aaron Swartz in a San Francisco bookshop in 2008, five years before his suicide.

 Internet activist Aaron Swartz in a San Francisco bookshop in 2008, five years before his suicide. Photograph: Noah Berger/Reuters

On Monday, BBC Four screened a remarkable film in its Storyville series. The Internet’s Own Boy told the story of the life and tragic death of Aaron Swartz, the leading geek wunderkind of his generation who was hounded to suicide at the age of 26 by a vindictive US administration. The film is still available on BBC iPlayer, and if you do nothing else this weekend make time to watch it, because it’s the most revealing source of insights about how the state approaches the internet since Edward Snowden first broke cover.

To say Swartz was a prodigy is an understatement. As an unknown teenager he was a co-designer of tools – like RSS and Markdown and of services like Reddit – that shaped the evolution of the web. He was also the kid who wrote most of the code underpinning Creative Commons, an inspired system that uses copyright law to give ordinary people control over how their digital creations can be used by others.

But Swartz was far more than an immensely-gifted programmer. The Storyville film includes home movies which show the entrancing, voraciously-inquisitive toddler who was father to the man. As he grew, he displayed the same open, questioning attitude to life one sees in other geniuses who are always asking “why?” and “why not?” and driving normal people nuts.


PlayStation Network back online, while Lizard hacker group basks in limelight | Technology | The Guardian

PlayStation Network back online, while Lizard hacker group basks in limelight | Technology | The Guardian.

The PlayStation Network, which provides the online infrastructure for Sony’s games consoles, is back online after a cyber assault on Christmas Eve. Photograph: Chesnot/Getty Images

The PlayStation Network is back online … for now.

The global gaming service used by 110m people was brought down on Christmas Eve, seemingly by a hacking group calling itself Lizard Squad. On Sunday however, Sony assured customers via its PlayStation blog that the system was now functioning.

The company also admitted for the first time that the disruption was caused by hackers who used a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack to flood the PlayStation servers with traffic, bringing access to a halt.

“As you probably know, PlayStation Network and some other gaming services were attacked over the holidays with artificially high levels of traffic designed to disrupt connectivity and online gameplay,” read the post. “This may have prevented your access to the network and its services over the last few days.”

Microsoft’s Xbox Live infrastructure was also attacked, reportedly by the same group, which revelled in its achievement via a series of tweets throughout Christmas day. However, the Xbox online infrastructure was functioning again by Boxing Day.

Formed in mid-2013, Lizard Squad has been stepping up its media profile in the wake of the Christmas attacks. In a series of interviews, two self-declared founding members have claimed that their motivations are amusement, and to highlight the security weaknesses of the systems.

“If I was working [at Microsoft or Sony] and had a big enough budget, I could totally stop these attacks,” “Ryan Cleary” (a pseudonym borrowed from an infamous LulzSec hacker) claimed to tech news site Daily Dot. “I’d buy more bandwidth, some specific equipment, and configure it correctly. It’s just about programming skill. With an attack of this scale, it could go up to the millions. But that’s really no problem for Sony and Microsoft.”

Speaking to Sky News, “Cleary” added, “These companies make tens of millions every month from subscriber fees and that doesn’t even include purchases made by their customers.

“They should have more than enough funding to be able to protect against these attacks.”

Lizard Squad has claimed that its actions against Sony and Microsoft were more sophisticated than standard DDoS attacks, which don’t usually require hackers to gain access to the target’s online infrastructure.

“There’s plenty of people saying we’re not hackers and DDoS isn’t hacking. For attacks of this scale, you can’t really do them without either having access to insane amounts of funding or being able to gain access to the computers via hacking,” “Cleary” said to Daily Dot. “You can’t just do DDoS attacks from your home computer. It doesn’t work.”

The group has even suggested that it has access to undersea cables that facilitate internet connections between the US and Europe.

But its appetite for fame may prove to be Lizard Squad’s undoing, after security journalist Brian Krebs claims to have uncovered the possible true identities of at least two members, both of whom have conducted TV interviews in the wake of the attacks.


Xbox live and Playstation attack: Christmas ruined for millions of gamers | Technology | The Guardian

Xbox live and Playstation attack: Christmas ruined for millions of gamers | Technology | The Guardian.

Millions of gamers could not use their PlayStation 4 after an apparent cyber-attack at Christmas

 Millions of gamers could not use their PlayStation 4 after an apparent cyber-attack at Christmas. Photograph: Chesnot/Getty Images

Millions of people could not use their games consoles for a second day as disruption on the Xbox Live and Sony Playstation networks continued after an apparent cyber-attack.

A group calling itself Lizard Squad claimed responsibility for bringing down both networks on Christmas Eve, which could have affected nearly 160 million gamers.

Even an intervention by eccentric internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, who offered the hackers free lifetime use of his file storage service, does not appear to have ended the attack. Known as a distributed denial of service, or DDOS, the attack is overloading the systems of both services by generating fake access requests.

Such an attack can prevent people from playing games even when they have a physical copy as newer consoles often require online authentication as an anti-piracy measure.


I'm an Anonymous hacker in prison, and I am not a crook. I'm an activist | Jeremy Hammond | Comment is free | theguardian.com

I’m an Anonymous hacker in prison, and I am not a crook. I’m an activist | Jeremy Hammond | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

We may have hacked Sony back in the day, but we are still a social justice movement, from economic inequality to police brutality. Hacktivism is still the future

guy fawkes mask protest
People like Barrett Brown get it. People like Sabu don’t: we are gaining street protest experience and political maturity. Photograph: Noah Berger/Reuters

Here in prison, I am asked a lot about hacking and especially about Anonymous, because of course there is interest in new technologies like Bitcoin for money or darknets for fraud. After all, convicts – like hackers – develop their own codes and ethics, and they are constantly finding ways to scam and exploit cracks in the system.

The anti-government message of Anonymous rings true among prisoners who have been railroaded, condemned and warehoused. So when they hear about hacked government websites and cops getting doxed, my fellow inmates often tell me things like, “It’s good to see people finally doing something about it.” That rejection of established, reformist avenues for achieving social change is why Anonymous continues as a force to be reckoned with, made all the more obvious by the presence of Guy Fawkes masks at the protests in Ferguson, Missouri – and beyond.

Hackers are a controversial, chaotic and commonly misunderstood bunch. Many of us have been arrested, from Mercedes Haefer and Andrew Auernheimer to Mustafa Al-Bassam and more, and few outside observers get that Anonymous is not a monolithic entity but a wide spectrum of backgrounds, politics and tactics. The journalist Barrett Brown gets it, but he continues to await his sentencing for merely linking to hacked material. And so I’ve been sharing a new book with my fellow inmates by the anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman called Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous.


Anonymous, LulzSec o Lizard Squad: las comunidades de hackers que atacan según reglas – BioBioChile

Anonymous, LulzSec o Lizard Squad: las comunidades de hackers que atacan según reglas – BioBioChile.

 

Símbolo común de Anonymous / geek.comSímbolo común de Anonymous / geek.com

 

Publicado por Eduardo Woo | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

 

Escudados en apodos exóticos, más o menos bien intencionados y exaltando sus talentos informáticos, los piratas cibernéticos forman una comunidad que busca crear el caos… pero en estricto acato a sus normas.

“La gente piensa que los piratas son asociales que viven en un granero. Eso es totalmente falso”, dijo a la AFP Nico Sell, organizadora de DEF CON, la convención más importante de los llamados hackers, cuya edición número 23 se celebrará el próximo año en Las Vegas (oeste de EEUU)

“Para ser bueno (en piratería), hay que comprender cómo funciona la gente y la sociedad. Estos cracks no son cracks normales”, añadió la cofundadora del servicio de mensajería encriptada Wickr.

Las tribus de piratas, entre ellas Anonymous, LulzSec o Lizard Squad, se dividen en dos grupos: los “sombreros blancos”, que utilizan sus habilidades con buenas intenciones, y los “sombreros negros”, que se dedican a espiar o robar.

Estos sabios clandestinos comparten sus hazañas en foros como DEF CON o en chats de internet como 4Chan, indicó por su parte Gabriella Coleman, especialista de esta comunidad de la Universidad McGill de Montreal, en Canadá.


Inside the mind of Derp, a hacking group with a taste for cyber chaos | Technology | theguardian.com

Inside the mind of Derp, a hacking group with a taste for cyber chaos | Technology | theguardian.com.

With cyber attacks on the rise, the Guardian meets the team behind one of the most famous incidents. This is the night DerpTrolling took down gaming superstar, Phantomlord

 

 

voltron angel
Derp is a loose collective of coders and computer experts, who have a taste and a talent for internet chaos. Photograph: Robert Anthony Provost/flickr

 

Friday 27 December 2013. The answer phone message was simple: “Get PhantomL0rd”. No one knew who it came from.

 

The message was left on a phone operated by “DerpTrolling”, a clandestine hacker group, active since 2011. Like many similar groups, Derp, as its tens of thousands of Twitter followers know it, is a loose collective of coders and computer experts, who have a taste and a talent for internet chaos. They identify a target – usually a large corporation, often a video game company – and attempt to break its online infrastructure.

 

But Derp has a unique approach. The group advertises a phone number on its Twitter page with the simple instruction: “call or text a request.” Dial the number and you can leave a message with the name of a website you would like to be taken offline. If they decide to act, the hackers then stage a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack against the target.

 

A DDoS attack is not hacking, it does not require the perpetrator to gain illicit access to the system – instead it involves directing a colossal flood of network traffic at the site until its servers buckle under the load. During the past five years, many of the world’s largest and most powerful websites, including PayPal, Mastercard and even the US National Security Agency have been shut down by DDoS attacks instigated by amateur hacker groups like Derp.

 

This time, however, the target was not a website but a person.

 

Enter Phantomlord

 

Jason Varga is a popular internet TV presenter who earns his living playing and commentating on online video games. Varga, known to his channel’s subscribers as PhantomL0rd, is one of the most popular “casters” in the business: he earns an estimated $184,000 a year from YouTube advertising, which supplements his already sizeable income generated from subscribers who pay to watch to his channel on the popular Twitch service, recently bought by Amazon for $970m.

 

Jason Varga AKA PhantomL0rd
Jason Varga AKA PhantomL0rd. Photograph: Jason Varga

 

The person who called Derp was perhaps a rival presenter or a bored viewer who wanted to cause some trouble during the school holidays. But their simple request was accepted.

 

DDoS attacks have vastly increased in frequency during the past few years. While some of the attacks are financially motivated (groups have demanded a ransom to be paid before they call off the attack), many are motivated by anti-corporate sentiment. When Mastercard and PayPal blocked donations to Wikileaks in 2011, the best-known “hacktivist” group, Anonymous, launched a DDoS attack against both sites in a programme of chaos it called “Operation Payback”.

 

Other hacker groups aren’t doing it for money or activistism, they’re doing it for fun, and to boast about their success on social media. It is the electronic equivalent of graffiti with a vaguely anti-establishment theme. This is where Derp operates.

 

Three days after the answerphone message was left, perhaps drawn to the idea of one of their DDoS attacks being streamed live on air, Derp chose to act against Varga.

 

At 4:07pm GMT on 30 December, the group tweeted: “Something special planned for League of Legends”, a reference to the hugely popular online PC game that Varga was playing while streaming footage to his hundreds of thousands of viewers. During the next few hours the group staged multiple DDoS attacks on the League of Legends servers. They successfully took the game, its accompanying website and forum offline around the world.

 

Rather than report the incident, Varga entered into a dialogue with the hackers. Realising the spectator value of what was happening, he made a deal with them, concerning the next game he was planning to play on air – the popular arena battle title, Dota 2.

 

“If my team wins, we’ll keep going,” he said, live on air. “[But] if my team starts to lose, Derp Bros, take this shit down.” The hackers agreed.

 

When Varga’s team lost the match the hackers made good on their promise: at 21:12pm, DOTA2 disappeared from the internet.

 

Throughout the evening the hackers continued to follow Varga online. They convinced him to play a game on the Disney-owned Club Penguin before they took the entire site down. They were enjoying the attention. They got more ambitious.

 

During the next few hours they successfully brought down various game-related websites, including Origin, the online web store of giant video game publisher, Electronic Arts. Varga asked the group why they were doing this. “For the lulz,” they replied, before adding, perhaps to lend a sub-note of gravitas to their campaign, that they also wanted to target greedy game companies.


"Existe un nivel de vigilancia que supera al de la Unión Soviética" – Público.es

“Existe un nivel de vigilancia que supera al de la Unión Soviética” – Público.es.

Considerado uno de los más prestigiosos hackers estadounidenses, Richard Stallman nos habla con sencillez y desparpajo sobre la filosofía y los retos del software libre

*KAY LEVIN | SOFÍA DE ROA | VIRGINIA UZAL Madrid 19/12/2013 08:34 Actualizado: 19/12/2013 09:21

 

Richard Stallman, padre del software libre.- AFP

Richard Stallman, padre del software libre.- AFP

“Todos deberíamos exponer en nuestros balcones y ventanas un cartel grande indicando que la Ley de Seguridad Ciudadana insulta a España”. Así de tajante se muestra Richard Stallman, padre del software libre, en una conferencia en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. A la cita se presenta descalzo, con la melena suelta y aspecto despreocupado. Comienza soltando frases lapidarias contra el Gobierno y la industria informática con una sinceridad divertida, pero con conocimiento de causa: el que aporta haber estado 30 años aplicando su inteligencia y “espíritu juguetón” para hackear el software y desafiar al monopolio de lo privativo.

Presenta un discurso directo, casi radical, en contra del servilismo ante el yugo informático. Ataca directamente a la conciencia y no hay medias tintas. Por eso, escucharle no deja indiferente. Explica con sencillez lo que significa el software libre: una filosofía iniciada por el hacker estadounidense, que desarrolló el primer sistema operativo libre, GNU (mal conocido como Linux), y creó la Free Software Foundation para proteger la libertad informática. Antes de eso estuvo trabajando en el prestigioso MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), tras comenzar estudios de Física en Harvard.

El principio de su filosofía es claro: “O los usuarios tienen el control del programa o el programa tiene el control de los usuarios”.


Ciberactivismo, nueva forma de protesta social | SurySur

Ciberactivismo, nueva forma de protesta social | SurySur.

dic42013

CIENCIA Y TECNOLOGÍA • CULTURA

Ciberactivismo, nueva forma de protesta social

ciberactivismo1

El 15 de noviembre de 2013 el intruso informático (“hacker”) Jeremy Hammond, vinculado con Anonymous, fue sentenciado a 10 años de prisión más 3 años de libertad supervisada, por realizar ataques cibernéticos a varias agencias gubernamentales y corporaciones, en particular a “Strategic Forcasting Inc.”, más conocida por “Stratfor”, compañía privada de inteligencia global.

Hammond transfirió correos electrónicos de Stratfor al grupo anti-secretos WikiLeaks. Los documentos publicados hasta ahora se relacionan con clientes como Goldman Sachs y Coca-Cola. Su ciberactivismo fue motivado por la preocupación ante el creciente papel que desempeñan firmas privadas en la obtención de inteligencia tanto dentro de Estados Unidos como en el exterior. “Como resultado del ciberataque a Stratfor –declaró Hammond en la corte- se conocen ahora algunos de los peligros de la industria de inteligencia privada”.

Hammond, con el pseudónimo de “Anarchaos” sustrajo, en uno de sus ataques a Stratfor, 200 gigabytes de información confidencial y puso fuera de servicio a sus computadoras durante seis semanas. Sarah Kinster, abogada de Hammond, alegó que nada de lo hecho por éste tenía por objetivo ganancias personales y sus acciones no eran otra cosa que una nueva forma de protesta.

Estados Unidos es el país de los secretos de Estado. Cada año clasifica cantidades colosales de información. Cada documento secreto que se relaciona con un trabajo sucio realizado por la CIA, el FBI u otra agencia gubernamental, genera nuevos documentos secretos que se refieren a las acciones posteriores imprescindibles para ocultar la acción ilegal primaria, del mismo modo que una persona mentirosa está obligada a seguir mintiendo para evitar que descubran sus patrañas.

El hecho de que nunca antes la dirección política de Estados Unidos se comportó de manera tan alejada de la ética, tanto en la esfera nacional como en la internacional, y nunca, por tanto, se vio en mayor necesidad de ocultar tanta información a sus ciudadanos, da origen a una nueva forma de protesta social, la de poner en conocimiento de la población lo que se mantiene secreto no porque tenga valor alguno para la seguridad nacional sino porque, de conocerse, se pondrían al descubierto las manipulaciones y mentiras de la administración.

Esta forma de lucha comenzó a cobrar importancia en la década de 1970. En los años recientes, al invadir el ciberespacio, plantea nuevos problemas filosóficos y éticos no resueltos totalmente, al tiempo que se muestra como un campo de acción de inconmensurables posibilidades. El ciberactivismo, que posee entre sus armas el ciberataque (“hack”), aunque yo prefiero el término ciberinfiltración, puede ser una herramienta formidable en el contrapunteo entre el secreto y la transparencia, para inclinar la balanza hacia esta última. Tirios y troyanos, por supuesto, pueden utilizar a su favor el intrusismo electrónico, pero la vulnerabilidad está de parte del que más y peores secretos necesite ocultar, lo cual coloca al imperio en situación extremadamente desventajosa.


El grupo de hackers "Anonymous" anuncia un ataque contra la "Escuela de las Américas" :: Llave en mano 3.0 :: América

El grupo de hackers “Anonymous” anuncia un ataque contra la “Escuela de las Américas” :: Llave en mano 3.0 :: América.

 

El grupo de hackers "Anonymous" anuncia un ataque contra la "Escuela de las Américas"
Ampliar

En un vídeo distribuido por internet “Anonymous” indicó que “ha iniciado una operación para destruir la Escuela de las Américas y toda la agenda bárbara de política exterior de Estados Unidos de la cual es parte”. EFE/Archivo

Washington, 13 nov (EFE).- El grupo de piratas informáticos “Anonymous” anunció hoy una operación contra la academia del Ejército de Estados Unidos conocida en el pasado como “Escuela de las Américas” en la que han recibido instrucción decenas de miles de militares latinoamericanos.

La “Escuela de las Américas”, que ahora se conoce como Instituto del Hemisferio Occidental para la Cooperación en Seguridad, con sede en Fort Benning (Georgia), operó durante décadas en la Zona del Canal de Panamá y los grupos de derechos humanos han denunciado que miles de sus egresados han estado involucrados en torturas, desapariciones y golpes militares.

Cada noviembre, miles de activistas realizan protestas en Fort Benning, conmemorando el asesinato en 1989 de seis sacerdotes jesuitas y dos empleadas, asesinados por un pelotón del batallón Atlacatl de la Fuerza Armada de El Salvador.

En un vídeo distribuido por internet “Anonymous” indicó que “ha iniciado una operación para destruir la Escuela de las Américas y toda la agenda bárbara de política exterior de Estados Unidos de la cual es parte”.

El anuncio incluye un vídeo en el cual se escucha la voz de una mujer, que habla en inglés, y se ve la imagen de una persona con el rostro cubierto por la máscara que ha hecho famosa en todo el mundo la película “Vendetta”.

Los activistas sostienen que militares graduados en la Escuela de las Américas “instalaron la dictadura de (Augusto) Pinochet en Chile, operaron centros de tortura y asesinaron a militantes políticos”.

“En Honduras, los graduados están ahora involucrados en una campaña brutal de represión de los movimientos sociales que luchan contra el régimen llevado al poder por graduados de la Escuela que derrocaron en 2009 al gobierno elegido democráticamente”, afirmó el comunicado.


Anonymous #ClosetheSOA #OpSOA | SOA Watch: Close the School of the Americas

Anonymous #ClosetheSOA #OpSOA | SOA Watch: Close the School of the Americas.

Anonymous #ClosetheSOA #OpSOA PDF Print E-mail
Anonymous, the loosely associated network of hacktivists, who gained fame as digital Internet Freedom Fighters, issued a Video Call to Actionsyme against the School of the Americas. The 2 minute video, with the hashtag #OpSOA calls on the Anonymous Collective to “expose the graduates and instructors of the SOA/ WHINSEC, and others who are responsible for their atrocities.” The movement to close the School of the Americas is made up of people from many backgrounds and represents a positive alternative to the system of violence and domination, and we are grateful for the support from the hacktivist community. With the increasing secrecy by the Obama administration, and their blatant disregard for the rare Congressional and Judicial calls for transparency, whistle-blowers like Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, and hactivists like Anonymous have played an important role in uncovering the truth about government abuses that affect all of us.


Anonymous: “We are calling on the Anonymous Collective to expose the graduates and instructors of the SOA/ WHINSEC, and others who are responsible for their atrocities. Converge at the gates of Fort Benning, Georgia from November 22-24, 2013. Join Us. We Are Anonymous. We Are Legion. We Do Not Forgive. We Do Not Forget. Expect Us.”


Die Goldgräber des digitalen Zeitalters | WOZ Die Wochenzeitung

Die Goldgräber des digitalen Zeitalters | WOZ Die Wochenzeitung.

Seit 2009 kursiert eine virtuelle Währung im Netz: Bitcoin. Was als Angriff anarchistischer Hacker auf die Banken und den Staat begann, ist inzwischen zum Eldorado für SpekulantInnen und zum Tummelplatz rechtslibertärer Tea-Party-AnhängerInnen geworden. Eine Begegnung mit einem Schweizer Goldgräber.

Von Yves Wegelin (Text) und Andreas Bodmer (Foto)

Die Geldmine im Zürcher Wohnzimmer: Raphael Voellmys Bitcoinrechner heizt auch gleich noch die gute Stube.

Raphael Voellmy ist Minengräber. Der 24-Jährige mit dem smarten Gesicht sitzt im T-Shirt, in Jeans und Turnschuhen in einem Café an der Zürcher Bahnhofstrasse. Seit er Anfang 2012 mit dem Graben begonnen habe, sagt Voellmy, habe er 32 000 US-Dollar auf die Seite gelegt. Allerdings verwahrt er das Geld in Bitcoins in einem virtuellen Geldbeutel auf seinem PC.

Das Gerät, mit dem er begonnen hat, Bitcoins zu schürfen, steht in seinem Wohnzimmer zu Hause: ein PC mit zwei externen Grafikkarten, die so heiss laufen, dass er sie mit zwei Wasserkörpern, die hinter dem Sofa stehen, kühlen muss. «Das Gerät», sagt der Informatikstudent verschmitzt, «hat mir die letzten beiden Winter gleichzeitig die Wohnung geheizt.» Das Schürfen geht so: Alle zehn Minuten gibt es im Netz ein hochkomplexes mathematisches Rätsel zu lösen. Voellmys Computer ist an einen Pool verbündeter Rechner angeschlossen, der das Rätsel zu lösen versucht – neben unzähligen anderen weltweit. Der Pool, der das Rätsel als Erster löst, erhält 25 Bitcoins, gut 3000 Dollar, die untereinander aufgeteilt werden.


Anonymous bloquearon decenas de sitios de internet israelíes

http://tecnologia.biobiochile.cl/notas/2012/11/17/anonymous-afirman-que-bloquearon-decenas-de-sitios-internet-israelies.shtml
Sábado 17 noviembre 2012 | 22:39
Publicado por Gerson Guzmán | La Información es de Agencia AFP · 1688 visitas
Imagen:AnonymousImagen: Anonymous

Los piratas informáticos del grupo Anonymous anunciaron este sábado que bloquearon los sitios internet de decenas de organizaciones israelíes y de un gran banco para protestar contra la ofensiva israelí contra los grupos armados de la franja de Gaza.