Marcus Hutchins: cybersecurity experts rally around arrested WannaCry ‘hero’ | Technology | The Guardian

The 23-year-old has fallen from grace as he battles accusations of involvement in a malware scam, but the cyber community has protested his innocence

Fuente: Marcus Hutchins: cybersecurity experts rally around arrested WannaCry ‘hero’ | Technology | The Guardian


With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian

The rise of the internet may have created our current predicament, but the people who populate the internet can help us get out of it. Next time you go back and forth with someone over a controversial issue online, stick to facts with good sources, and engage in open dialogue. Most importantly, be nice. You may end up being a small part of the process whereby information chaos becomes knowledge.

Fuente: With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian


Prominent Human Rights Activists in Egypt Targeted by Sophisticated Hacking Attacks

The campaign, which the reports call Nile Phish, coincides with an unprecedented crackdown on civil society in Egypt over the past few years, with non-governmental organizations and their staff being subjected to interrogations, arrests, travel bans, asset freezes, forced closures and a long-running trial over accusations of receiving foreign funding to destabilize the country.

Fuente: Prominent Human Rights Activists in Egypt Targeted by Sophisticated Hacking Attacks


El erróneamente llamado “derecho al olvido” no es un derecho, es una forma de censura | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

En esencia, incorporar el mal llamado “derecho al olvido” en la Constitución de la Ciudad de México, lejos de un avance en el ejercicio de derechos, es una amenaza grave al ejercicio de los mismos. Frente a derechos tan fundamentales como el derecho a la verdad, el acceso a la información, el debido proceso, la libertad de expresión y en un marco democrático marcado por la deliberación pública, conceptos fraudulentos como “el derecho al olvido” suponen una regresión.

Fuente: El erróneamente llamado “derecho al olvido” no es un derecho, es una forma de censura | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


Sólo actas de 1.300 cabildos de más de13.000 serán validadas por problemas en la web – El Mostrador

Una seria advertencia hicieron algunos miembros del Consejo Ciudadano de Observadores (CCO) respecto a que sólo actas de 1.300 cabildos de los más de 13.000 que están inscritos serán validadas e incluidas en el texto final del gobierno, debido a que la página web ha presentado deficiencias como el no contar con un sistema de autoguardado y problemas de conexión.

Fuente: Sólo actas de 1.300 cabildos de más de13.000 serán validadas por problemas en la web – El Mostrador


Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian

Over 81,000 reports have been made to I Paid a Bribe, a special website for whistleblowers in India. Not in My Country guides students in Uganda and Kenya through the complaint process for reporting lecturers for corruption, and €5m of corruption involving Greek civil servants has been uncovered through the website EdosaFakelaki.

Fuente: Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian


Münchausen by internet: the sickness bloggers who fake it online | Society | The Guardian

Münchausen by internet: the sickness bloggers who fake it online | Society | The Guardian.

How would you fake cancer? Shave your head? Pluck your eyebrows? Install a chemo port into your neck? These days you don’t need to. Belle Gibson’s story is a masterclass on faking cancer in the modern age. She fooled Apple, Cosmopolitan, Elle and Penguin. She fooled the hundreds of thousands who bought her app, read her blog and believed that her story could be their story.

Diagnosed with a brain tumour aged 20, Gibson had four months to live. She blogged her journey of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatments she shunned after eight weeks. Instead, she cut gluten and dairy and turned to oxygen therapy, craniosacral treatments and colonic irrigation. Against all odds, she made it. Her followers were inspired. If Belle could make it, maybe they could too.

Gibson launched The Whole Pantry app in 2013, filled with healthy living tips and recipes. She promised a third of proceeds from the 300,000 downloads ($3.79 per download) to charity. Elle named her “The Most Inspiring Woman You’ve Met This Year”, Cosmopolitan awarded her a “Fun, Fearless Female award” and Penguin published her cookbook. Apple pre-installed her app on Apple Watch and flew her to its Silicon Valley launch.

Then cancer re-emerged, and Gibson announced on Instagram: “It hurts me to find space tonight to let you all know with love and strength that I’ve been diagnosed with a third and forth [sic] cancer. One is secondary and the other is primary. I have cancer in my blood, spleen, brain, uterus, and liver. I am hurting.”

 


From GCHQ to tech giants: why the fight for your personal data matters | Technology | The Guardian

From GCHQ to tech giants: why the fight for your personal data matters | Technology | The Guardian.

It's now possible to find out what personal data GCHQ holds on you.It’s now possible to find out what personal data GCHQ holds on you. Photograph: GCHQ / British Ministry of Defence/EPA

Government agencies and companies across the world hold large amounts of data on each and every one of us. From profiles of your favourite movies to where you ate out last night, this vast mountain of data is a representation of you that you can do little about.

But is that strictly true? Can you find out what GCHQ, Facebook or Google hold on you? And can you get it removed?


Sophisticated iPhone and Android malware is spying on Hong Kong protesters | The Verge

Sophisticated iPhone and Android malware is spying on Hong Kong protesters | The Verge.

Researchers say all signs point to the Chinese government

 

 

A fake smartphone app is being used to remotely monitor pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, according to a report from the New York Times. Researchers from Lacoon Mobile Security say the phishing scam is spreading across the messaging application WhatsApp, through texts that read: “Check out this Android app designed by Code4HK for the coordination of OCCUPY CENTRAL!”, along with a link to download software. Lacoon says the software, once downloaded, can access a user’s personal data, including phone calls, text messages, and the physical location of their smartphone. Code4HK — a developer community that has helped to spread information about the protests — tells the Times it had nothing to do with the texts.

 

The origin of the scam remains unknown, but Lacoon CEO Michael Shaulov says the Chinese government is likely behind it, given the location of the servers and the sophistication of the operation. The company traced it to a computer that they say is similar to those that the Chinese government allegedly used to launch cyberattacks against US targets last year. The spread of the app remains equally unclear, though Shaulov says it was downloaded by one out of every ten phones that received the fake message. It has affected both Android and iOS users alike, although many in the security world have noted that only jailbroken iOS phones are vulnerable.


Falabella y Líder encabezan listado de portales con más reclamos por compras por internet – BioBioChile

Falabella y Líder encabezan listado de portales con más reclamos por compras por internet – BioBioChile.


Agencia UNO

Agencia UNO

Publicado por Francisca Rivas
El Servicio Nacional del Consumidor (Sernac) dio a conocer cuáles son los portales que recibieron más reclamos por compras realizadas por internet, durante el primer semestre de 2014.

9.856 reclamos fueron recibidos entre enero y junio de este año en contra el comercio electrónico, informó la entidad estatal.

El listado es encabezado por Falabella.cl, empresa contra la cual iban dirigidas el 23,6% de las quejas totales, correspondientes a 2.325 reclamos de clientes. Más abajo, le sigue Líder Internet con 12% y Groupon con 11,6%.

También están presentes en el ranking las tiendas en línea Ripley, París, Despegar.com, Cuponatic, Agrupémonos, Club Point, entre otras.


El lobby de Microsoft en un mercado de 36 mil millones de pesos y la pérdida de inocencia del diputado Vlado Mirosevic – El Mostrador

El lobby de Microsoft en un mercado de 36 mil millones de pesos y la pérdida de inocencia del diputado Vlado Mirosevic – El Mostrador.

En juego estaban los miles de millones de pesos que el Estado gasta por año en licencias de softwares. Un reportaje de la Revista Sábado de El Mercurio revela cómo cinco parlamentarios de la Nueva Mayoría cambiaron de opinión en menos de 24 horas y el rol que jugaron los diputados Daniel Farcas y Jorge Insunza. El impacto se sintió en el protocolo de Reforma Tributaria que este martes se vota en la Sala del Senado.

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Un extenso reportaje de la Revista Sábado, acompañado de una entrevista al diputado Vlado Mirosevic, revela el lobby de Microsoft para mantener control del mercado de software en el aparato del Estado.

En juego estaban 36 mil millones de pesos que el Estado gasta por año en licencias de softwares. La cifra no incluye las consultorías asociadas a las ventas. El reportaje muestra cómo cinco parlamentarios de la Nueva Mayoría cambiaron de opinión en menos de 24 horas y el rol clave que jugaron los diputados Daniel Farcas y Jorge Insunza. El impacto se sintió en el protocolo de Reforma Tributaria que este martes se vota en la Sala del Senado.


Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept

Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept.

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Featured photo - Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop DestructionDocuments obtained from the Obama administration from an Associated Press FOIA request

On July 20, 2013, agents of the U.K. government entered The Guardian newsroom in London and compelled them to physically destroy the computers they were using to report on the Edward Snowden archive. The Guardian reported this a month later after my partner, David Miranda, was detained at Heathrow Airport for 11 hours under a British terrorism law and had all of his electronic equipment seized. At the time, the Obama administration—while admitting that it was told in advance of the Heathrow detention—pretended that it knew nothing about the forced laptop destruction and would never approve of such attacks on press freedom. From the August 20, 2013, press briefing by then-deputy White House press secretary Josh Earnest:

Q: A last one on the NSA—The Guardian newspaper, following on everything that was discussed yesterday—The Guardian is saying that British authorities destroyed several hard drives, because they wanted to keep secrets that Edward Snowden had leaked from actually getting out.  They were stored in The Guardian‘s—they had some hard drives there at their offices.  British authorities went in there and destroyed these hard drives. Did the American government get a heads up about that the way you did about the person being detained?

MR. EARNEST:  I’ve seen the published reports of those accusations, but I don’t have any information for you on that.

Q: And does the U.S. government think it’s appropriate for a government, especially one of our allies, to go in and destroy hard drives? Is that something this administration would do?

MR. EARNEST: The only thing I know about this are the public reports about this, so it’s hard for me to evaluate the propriety of what they did based on incomplete knowledge of what happened.

Q: But this administration would not do that, would not go into an American media company and destroy hard drives, even if it meant trying to protect national security, you don’t think?

MR. EARNEST: It’s very difficult to imagine a scenario in which that would be appropriate.

But emails just obtained by Associated Press pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request (FOIA) prove that senior Obama national security officials— including Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and then-NSA chief Keith Alexander—not only knew in advance that U.K. officials intended to force The Guardian to destroy their computers, but overtly celebrated it.