Aullidos digitales Revista Qué Pasa

De un tiempo a esta parte he bajado mi voyerismo de Twitter, partiendo por eliminar muchas cuentas que seguía que me generaban más ruido interno que ventanas informativas. Menos es quizás más y eliminé unas ochocientas de un tirón. Algunos de los primeros expulsados fueron aquellos que retuitean otras cuentas de manera compulsiva. No he sido un gran participante de Twitter en el sentido que no debato ni lanzo comentarios (a veces lo uso como una suerte de herramienta de relaciones públicas), pero antes -lo reconozco- me gustaba mirar, seguir a algunos, pelar, exasperarme y sapear. Ya no.

Fuente: Aullidos digitales Revista Qué Pasa


Why a digital detox is bad for us | Ruth Whippman | Life and style | The Guardian

Negative emotions and anxiety exist for a reason. The rancid sense of rising terror that we often feel in response to the current news cycle is a crucial early-warning system that things are indeed not right. Rather than trying to ignore and appease those feelings of anxiety by disengaging, we should be listening to what they are telling us. We need to be more vigilant, not less.

Fuente: Why a digital detox is bad for us | Ruth Whippman | Life and style | The Guardian


How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian

False claims abound on the internet and are snaring many children into believing them

Fuente: How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian


Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian

The fear that the human brain cannot cope with the onslaught of information made possible by the latest development was first voiced in response to the printing press, back in the sixteenth century. Swap “printing press” for “internet” and you have the exact same concerns today, regularly voiced in the mainstream media, and usually focused on children.But is there any legitimacy to these claims? Or are they just needless scaremongering?

Fuente: Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian


Quisiera compartir algunas reflexiones, que he…

Quisiera compartir algunas reflexiones, que he ido madurando luego de un año de trabajar en temas relacionados con el análisis de redes sociales (“social network analysis”). Actualmente estamos presenciando una emergente odiosidad del trollero desinformado: miles de adictos a las redes sociales que comentan de todo, que ansían convertirse en líderes de opinión, sumándose a los comentarios clichés promovidos por el “mass media”, sin fomentar el diálogo ni tener un verdadero espíritu crítico, sin leer libros

Fuente: Fabián Farisori – Quisiera compartir algunas reflexiones, que he…


Memoria digital, a gusto del consumidor – 28.08.2014 – lanacion.com  

Memoria digital, a gusto del consumidor – 28.08.2014 – lanacion.com  .

Por   | Para LA NACION

Esas palabras de Friedrich Nietzsche resuenan en los reclamos que hoy se alzan contra los motores de búsqueda como Google o Yahoo y reivindican el “derecho al olvido” en Internet. Es decir, el derecho a que se borren de la Web datos personales que, más allá de que hayan sido ciertos, en la actualidad perjudican de algún modo al demandante.

Amparados en la insólita decisión de la Unión Europea, que en mayo de este año resolvió que Google debe atender las peticiones de los usuarios cuando soliciten el borrado de contenidos que los afectan negativamente, han proliferado los procesos judiciales que buscan limitar la información disponible.

Ese reconocimiento tan reciente del “derecho al olvido” remueve algunos cimientos de nuestra tradición filosófica y hace surgir la duda: ¿estaría consumándose, por fin, en pleno siglo XXI, aquel feliz desprendimiento de las garras de la memoria, defendido por el filósofo alemán en 1873? Quizás sí, aunque no exactamente. Porque lo que entendemos por memoria y olvido, incluso por “ser alguien” y la relación que eso implica con los propios recuerdos, todo eso suele cambiar con los vaivenes de la historia. Y tal vez se haya reconfigurado de modos inesperados en los últimos tiempos.


Forget Me: the real reasons people ask Google to erase their online presences | Technology | The Guardian

Forget Me: the real reasons people ask Google to erase their online presences | Technology | The Guardian.

Irrelevant, outdated or otherwise inappropriate? A new website helps you to explain exactly how to get information about yourself removed from Google – so what are the most frequent reasons customers give?
erase history delete button

Forget everything … more than 40,000 requests for removal of online data have been made via the Forget Me website. Photograph: Felix Clay for the Guardian

Why do people exercise their “right to be forgotten” by Google? The website Forget Me, which launched last week and offers users a submission service to Google with templated forms that tick all the search engine’s legal boxes, has released a breakdown of its customer’s motivations.

Invasion of privacy accounted for 306 of the 1,106 submissions that Forget Me filed to Google as of Tuesday, with disclosure of home address the largest subcategory (66 submissions). “Negative opinions”, “redundancy” and “origin, nationality or ethnic identity” follow. Sexual orientation appears way down the list of privacy-related reasons for removing web pages, below disclosure of income and philosophical belief. Forget Me’s sample of just over 1,000 submissions represents a small percentage of the 40,000-plus requests received by Google, but is still large enough to indicate the most pressing concerns.


How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations – The Intercept

How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations – The Intercept.

By 
Featured photo - How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy ReputationsA page from a GCHQ top secret document prepared by its secretive JTRIG unit

One of the many pressing stories that remains to be told from the Snowden archive is how western intelligence agencies are attempting to manipulate and control online discourse with extreme tactics of deception and reputation-destruction. It’s time to tell a chunk of that story, complete with the relevant documents.

Over the last several weeks, I worked with NBC News to publish a series of articles about “dirty trick” tactics used by GCHQ’s previously secret unit, JTRIG (Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group). These were based on four classified GCHQ documents presented to the NSA and the other three partners in the English-speaking “Five Eyes” alliance. Today, we at the Intercept are publishing another new JTRIG document, in full, entitled “The Art of Deception: Training for Online Covert Operations.”

By publishing these stories one by one, our NBC reporting highlighted some of the key, discrete revelations: the monitoring of YouTube and Blogger, the targeting of Anonymous with the very same DDoS attacks they accuse “hacktivists” of using, the use of “honey traps” (luring people into compromising situations using sex) and destructive viruses. But, here, I want to focus and elaborate on the overarching point revealed by all of these documents: namely, that these agencies are attempting to control, infiltrate, manipulate, and warp online discourse, and in doing so, are compromising the integrity of the internet itself.

Among the core self-identified purposes of JTRIG are two tactics: (1) to inject all sorts of false material onto the internet in order to destroy the reputation of its targets; and (2) to use social sciences and other techniques to manipulate online discourse and activism to generate outcomes it considers desirable. To see how extremist these programs are, just consider the tactics they boast of using to achieve those ends: “false flag operations” (posting material to the internet and falsely attributing it to someone else), fake victim blog posts (pretending to be a victim of the individual whose reputation they want to destroy), and posting “negative information” on various forums. Here is one illustrative list of tactics from the latest GCHQ document we’re publishing today:

Other tactics aimed at individuals are listed here, under the revealing title “discredit a target”:

 


The iParadox: how our smartphones are blocking our path to wisdom | Arianna Huffington | Media Network | Guardian Professional

The iParadox: how our smartphones are blocking our path to wisdom | Arianna Huffington | Media Network | Guardian Professional.

Our generation is one addicted to technology, bloated with information and starved of wisdom, writes Arianna Huffington
Arianna Huffington

Big data and our growing reliance on technology are conspiring to create a noisy traffic jam between us and our place of insight and peace. Photograph: Sebasti O Moreira/EPA

What leading executives need more than anything today is wisdom. And one of the things that makes it harder and harder to connect with our wisdom is our increasing dependence on technology. Our hyper-connectedness is the snake lurking in our digital Garden of Eden.

“People have a pathological relationship with their devices,” said Kelly McGonigal, a psychologist who studies the science of self-control at Stanford’s School of Medicine. “People feel not just addicted, but trapped.” We are finding it harder and harder to unplug and renew ourselves.

Professor Mark Williams summed up the damage we’re doing to ourselves: “What we know from the neuroscience – from looking at the brain scans of people that are always rushing around, who never taste their food, who are always going from one task to another without actually realising what they’re doing – is that the emotional part of the brain that drives people is on high alert all the time…

“So, when people think: ‘I’m rushing around to get things done,’ it’s almost like, biologically, they’re rushing around just as if they were escaping from a predator. That’s the part of the brain that’s active. But nobody can run fast enough to escape their own worries.”

Mindfulness, on the other hand, “cultivates our ability to do things knowing that we’re doing them”. In other words, we become aware that we’re aware. It’s an incredibly important tool – and one that we can’t farm out to technology.