El aterrador juego de “la ballena azul” se viraliza en América Latina – El Mostrador

Autoridades colombianas investigan las muertes de tres adolescentes que podrían estar relacionadas con el “juego” en línea.

Fuente: El aterrador juego de “la ballena azul” se viraliza en América Latina – El Mostrador


The internet scammer who loved me (not) | Life and style | The Guardian

On 2 February, at the cusp of Valentine’s Day, the Los Angeles sheriff’s department warned of the “growing criminal epidemic” of romance scams during a community meeting called Love Hurts. Romance scams are a type of online fraud, in which criminals pose as desirable partners on dating sites or email, win the hearts of their victims and end up fleecing them of their money.

Fuente: The internet scammer who loved me (not) | Life and style | The Guardian


How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian

False claims abound on the internet and are snaring many children into believing them

Fuente: How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian


‘Fraudebook’: toda la libertad que quita un ‘like’

El libro es un ensayo de Vicente Serrano Marín, doctor en Filosofía de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, en el que desgrana cómo manejan las redes sociales nuestras vidasFacebook es un dispositivo político y una máquina capaz de incidir en nuestra afectividad para convertirla en un factor de producción, según el autor

Fuente: ‘Fraudebook’: toda la libertad que quita un ‘like’


Münchausen by internet: the sickness bloggers who fake it online | Society | The Guardian

Münchausen by internet: the sickness bloggers who fake it online | Society | The Guardian.

How would you fake cancer? Shave your head? Pluck your eyebrows? Install a chemo port into your neck? These days you don’t need to. Belle Gibson’s story is a masterclass on faking cancer in the modern age. She fooled Apple, Cosmopolitan, Elle and Penguin. She fooled the hundreds of thousands who bought her app, read her blog and believed that her story could be their story.

Diagnosed with a brain tumour aged 20, Gibson had four months to live. She blogged her journey of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatments she shunned after eight weeks. Instead, she cut gluten and dairy and turned to oxygen therapy, craniosacral treatments and colonic irrigation. Against all odds, she made it. Her followers were inspired. If Belle could make it, maybe they could too.

Gibson launched The Whole Pantry app in 2013, filled with healthy living tips and recipes. She promised a third of proceeds from the 300,000 downloads ($3.79 per download) to charity. Elle named her “The Most Inspiring Woman You’ve Met This Year”, Cosmopolitan awarded her a “Fun, Fearless Female award” and Penguin published her cookbook. Apple pre-installed her app on Apple Watch and flew her to its Silicon Valley launch.

Then cancer re-emerged, and Gibson announced on Instagram: “It hurts me to find space tonight to let you all know with love and strength that I’ve been diagnosed with a third and forth [sic] cancer. One is secondary and the other is primary. I have cancer in my blood, spleen, brain, uterus, and liver. I am hurting.”

 


Violent video games research: consensus or confusion? | Pete Etchells & Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com

Violent video games research: consensus or confusion? | Pete Etchells & Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com.

A new paper arguing that there is consensus that violent video games cause aggression highlights the pitfalls of peer review

 

Destiny video game
Do researchers agree whether violent video games cause aggression? We don’t seem to be any closer to answering that question. Photograph: PR

 

It seems like a simple question to ask, but it is one that is apparently very difficult to answer: what are the effects of violent media on our behaviour? It’s also a question that regularly produces heated debates, both in scientific journals and in the mainstream news. However, a new study published this week in the Psychology of Popular Media Culture (PPMC) argues that there shouldn’t be a debate at all. Instead, they claim to have found a “consensus” among media researchers, paediatricians and parents, that violent media can cause aggression in children.

 

The study, by Brad Bushman and Carlos Cruz at Ohio State University, and Mario Gollwitzer at Philipps University Marburg, asked participants to complete an online survey asking them how much they agree with the statement “violent X can increase aggressive behaviour in children”, where X included a number of different types of media, ranging from comic books and literature to movies and video games. They were also asked the extent to which they agree with two other statements: one asking whether there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression, and another asking whether media violence is a factor in real life violence.

 

According to Bushman and his team, the results pointed to a broad consensus that exposure to media violence had a negative effect on children. In a related press release, Bushman states that they “found the overwhelming majority of media researchers, parents and paediatricians agree that violent media is harmful to children.”

 

What consensus?

 

We don’t think the data are anywhere near as clear-cut as Bushman and colleagues make out. Let’s take the statement “there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression”. Here are the results for the four groups of people:

 

data visualisation from Bushman et al 2014
Data responses to the statement “there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression”. Data taken from Bushman et al., 2014. Figure produced by Pete Etchells. Photograph: Pete Etchells

 

As you can see, of the researchers that are potentially active in this area, 61% of media psychologists and 56% of communication scientists agree or strongly agree with that statement. Averaging across all four groups of people, 66% agree with the statement, whereas 19% don’t, and 15% are on the fence. As Meatloaf would no doubt agree, two out of three ain’t bad, but it is hardly a “consensus”.


Is there a Rihanna sex tape? No, it's a malware scam on Facebook | Technology | theguardian.com

Is there a Rihanna sex tape? No, it’s a malware scam on Facebook | Technology | theguardian.com.

But it’s not as popular as the fake app pretending to tell you who’s been peeking at your profile

Clicking on a Facebook link to a 'Rihanna sex tape' won't end well.
Clicking on a Facebook link to a ‘Rihanna sex tape’ won’t end well. Photograph: Patrick McMullan Co./REX

There is no sex tape of Rihanna and her boyfriend doing the rounds online. You can’t see who’s been looking at your Facebook profile. And you can’t change your Facebook colour either.

This may all sound obvious, but according to antivirus firm Bitdefender, these are the most popular malware scams on the social network in 2014.

The company has published a list of the top 10 Facebook scams, with the fake app promising to tell you your Facebook views and visitors by far the most popular, accounting for 30.2% of bogus links it identified on the social network this year.

Clicking on any of them will lead Facebook users to sites that try to install viruses on their computers, as malware developers continue to seek new ways to spread their software to unsuspecting victims.

The chart is good news for Taylor Swift and Disneyland, who both featured in Bitdefender’s list a year ago. Swift’s non-existent sex tape and an offer of a free trip to Disneyland have fallen from the top 10 over the last 12 months.

“Why do people still want to see who has been taking a peek at their profile, despite all security warnings? I think they believe these are legitimate apps,” said chief security strategist Catalin Cosoi.

“This is social engineering at its finest – a challenging mental game that pushes the right psychological buttons. The baits have changed over time, with stalkers, peekers, admirers, overly attached girlfriends and exes haunting you, but the reason this scam works is simple: human nature.”


Los recortes de Google Brasil, tras la derrota ante Alemania | SurySur

Los recortes de Google Brasil, tras la derrota ante Alemania | SurySur.

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br derrota

El buscador de Internet eliminó resultados relacionados con la derrota ante Alemania por considerar que son ofensivos. Palabras como “derrotados”, “humillados” o “destruidos” quedaron bloqueadas, de la misma manera que quedó anulada la vinculación con “vergüenza”.

La ilusión de Brasil se vio truncada tras la abultada derrota frente a Alemania en semifinales. “Derrotados”, “humillados”, “destruidos”, ésas fueron algunas de las palabras más buscadas en Google junto al término Brasil. Sin embargo, el buscador no ofreció resultados relacionados con esas palabras, tampoco con “vergüenza” cuando se entraba en Trends, su herramienta para consultar las tendencias dentro del buscador en tiempo real.

Google ha creado una adaptación de su página de tendencias adaptada al Mundial; en la misma se muestran los resultados de los partidos, comentarios y curiosidades, así como las búsquedas más comunes antes y después de los encuentros. Para actualizar y publicar esta web han creado una redacción en la sede de Google en San Francisco, expresamente para el evento.

La intención de este grupo es usar las tendencias de lo que buscan los usuarios para, tras analizarlo, convertirlo en contenido social enfocado en conseguir difusión en Google+, Facebook o Twitter. Algunos ejemplos de este contenido podrían ser que, durante la final, junto a Alemania se buscaba la secuencia “cuatro estrellas”, haciendo referencia las que en lo sucesivo los teutones lucirán en su camiseta, mientras que junto a Argentina crecieron las búsquedas que tenían que ver con “mantener la fe”.

Sam Clohesy, responsable de este experimento, defiende la decisión de quitar las palabras negativas junto a Brasil. No se trata de una orden sino de una decisión que obedece a un sentimiento de compasión: “No queremos echar sal en las heridas. Una historia negativa sobre Brasil no va a tener necesariamente éxito en las redes sociales”. A diferencia de lo que sucede en el buscador, donde no se tienen en cuenta las sensibilidades, en esta herramienta se ha retocado el resultado real que marcaría la tendencia.