La verdad sobre los niños y las redes sociales – El Mostrador

Hace unas semanas, un informe sobre el impacto de las redes sociales en la salud mental de los niños británicos me llamó la atención. En una encuesta realizada a 1,500 jóvenes de todo el Reino Unido, la Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) exploró cómo las plataformas como Instagram, Snapchat y Facebook alimentaban la ansiedad, la depresión y la falta de sueño de los niños.

Fuente: La verdad sobre los niños y las redes sociales – El Mostrador


Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children? | Rowan Davies | Opinion | The Guardian

Research has found a link between ‘technoference’ and poor child behaviour. The need for light relief is very human, but perhaps we can find a happier balance

Fuente: Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children? | Rowan Davies | Opinion | The Guardian


Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian

The fear that the human brain cannot cope with the onslaught of information made possible by the latest development was first voiced in response to the printing press, back in the sixteenth century. Swap “printing press” for “internet” and you have the exact same concerns today, regularly voiced in the mainstream media, and usually focused on children.But is there any legitimacy to these claims? Or are they just needless scaremongering?

Fuente: Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian


Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian

Don’t put your daughter on the stage, Mrs Worthington. But in 2016, what if the stage is YouTube, and your daughter (or son) is demanding to be put on it, playing Minecraft?That’s the dilemma facing a growing number of parents, whose children aren’t just watching YouTube Minecraft channels like The Diamond Minecart, Stampy and CaptainSparklez – they want to follow in their blocky footsteps.

Fuente: Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian


Gaming: don’t think it’s all bad for kids. It can be a step to a creative future | Technology | The Guardian

Gaming: don’t think it’s all bad for kids. It can be a step to a creative future | Technology | The Guardian.

The journey from playing to designing and making games can be a short one, and brings rich educational rewards for children

Project Spark
An image from Project Spark, a program that can be used to design and make games.

Despite their ubiquity, despite the vast sales and the increasing calls for the medium to be recognised as an artform, video games – that most obviously visual of media – still have an image problem. And it is more than superficial, it goes to the heart of the home, where concerned parents worry about the deleterious effect on their sons and daughters. However, while the evils of gaming rhetoric may make the most noise, parents who have fears may be intrigued to know that it is not the only story in town.

Children themselves are now refuting the stereotype that gaming is a mindless, pointless hobby, as the flexibility of the medium allows them to grow from player to creator. And the game-makers agree: “Games as a medium always involve creativity on the player’s part,” says Benjamin Donoghue, creative director at Blackstaff Games. “Creativity is about exploring what you can do within a defined set of rules.” Blackstaff is currently working on DogBiscuit: The Quest for Crayons, a drawing game for mobile devices in which the player designs parts of the game world.


Parents! Focus less on worrying about Minecraft and more on understanding it | Technology | The Guardian

Parents! Focus less on worrying about Minecraft and more on understanding it | Technology | The Guardian.

Millions of kids are obsessed with Mojang’s crafting game, but understanding it rather than fearing it is a good first step for parents

Children love Minecraft, but is that something to worry about?
Children love Minecraft, but is that something to worry about? Photograph: Voisin/Phanie/Rex

A lot of people are getting hot under the collar about the BBC’s article on Minecraft, children and parenting, written by journalist Jolyon Jenkins.

Should parents ever worry about Minecraft? asks whether Minecraft is entirely healthy for kids, from addiction and lessening interest in the real world through to the prospect of “children being digitally mugged” by other players.

Jenkins clearly knows that he’ll have critics, referring to “Minecraft’s champions”, “the other side” and “the opposition” in the piece when suggesting how they might try to counter his arguments, setting this up as a battle.

At this point, as someone who writes regularly about children and technology – Minecraft included – I’m probably expected to saddle up and charge into battle, laying waste to Jenkins’ arguments.

He does make some points worth talking about in a much more balanced and less adversarial way. But my main response boils down to this: wouldn’t it be better for parents to understand Minecraft rather than worry about it?

Because once they understand the game and what their children are getting out of it, they’ll have a much better base of knowledge to make parenting decisions about and around it – from setting time limits to ensuring it’s complemented by other activities.


ADHD and the relentless internet – is there a connection? | Technology | The Guardian

ADHD and the relentless internet – is there a connection? | Technology | The Guardian.

Hyperactivity disorders are now the second most diagnosed childhood conditions in the US behind asthma, with 20% of college students sufffering

A young boy at a computer
‘Our brain grows and changes according to our experiences.’ So is the effect of the internet mimicking ADHD? Photograph: Alamy

The internet might make you feel hyperactive, but do you really have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder?

Michael Pietrus PsyD, coordinator of the ADHD assessment protocol at the University of Chicago, explains how the internet encourages behaviour that at least mimics ADHD, and can exacerbate the condition in people who have it already.

Pietrus looks after many students at the college who feel the effects of academic and social pressure. In the US, 11% of children between four and 17 now have a diagnosis of ADHD and the rates have been going up by 5% every year from 2003 to 2011. It’s now the most commonly diagnosed condition for children in the US after asthma. Twenty per cent of the US college population now have ADHD, which appears as hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity, and are at higher risk of substance abuse and self medication, depression and a host of other consequent conditions.

“People with ADHD are hardwired for novelty seeking, which until recently was an evolutionary advantage,” said Pietrus, speaking at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas. ADHD sufferers have fewer dopamine receptors, which means that a normally interesting activity seems less rewarding or even boring.

No one can explain the increase in ADHD in the US, Pietrus said. “People engage in compulsion for all sorts of reasons and often because of the way their personality extends into the online space. But compulsive behaviour is reinforced and rewarded, and that has an impact on the ability to plan and organise as well as focus on tasks and self regulate our behaviour.”


Violent video games research: consensus or confusion? | Pete Etchells & Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com

Violent video games research: consensus or confusion? | Pete Etchells & Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com.

A new paper arguing that there is consensus that violent video games cause aggression highlights the pitfalls of peer review

 

Destiny video game
Do researchers agree whether violent video games cause aggression? We don’t seem to be any closer to answering that question. Photograph: PR

 

It seems like a simple question to ask, but it is one that is apparently very difficult to answer: what are the effects of violent media on our behaviour? It’s also a question that regularly produces heated debates, both in scientific journals and in the mainstream news. However, a new study published this week in the Psychology of Popular Media Culture (PPMC) argues that there shouldn’t be a debate at all. Instead, they claim to have found a “consensus” among media researchers, paediatricians and parents, that violent media can cause aggression in children.

 

The study, by Brad Bushman and Carlos Cruz at Ohio State University, and Mario Gollwitzer at Philipps University Marburg, asked participants to complete an online survey asking them how much they agree with the statement “violent X can increase aggressive behaviour in children”, where X included a number of different types of media, ranging from comic books and literature to movies and video games. They were also asked the extent to which they agree with two other statements: one asking whether there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression, and another asking whether media violence is a factor in real life violence.

 

According to Bushman and his team, the results pointed to a broad consensus that exposure to media violence had a negative effect on children. In a related press release, Bushman states that they “found the overwhelming majority of media researchers, parents and paediatricians agree that violent media is harmful to children.”

 

What consensus?

 

We don’t think the data are anywhere near as clear-cut as Bushman and colleagues make out. Let’s take the statement “there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression”. Here are the results for the four groups of people:

 

data visualisation from Bushman et al 2014
Data responses to the statement “there is a causal relationship between exposure to violent media and aggression”. Data taken from Bushman et al., 2014. Figure produced by Pete Etchells. Photograph: Pete Etchells

 

As you can see, of the researchers that are potentially active in this area, 61% of media psychologists and 56% of communication scientists agree or strongly agree with that statement. Averaging across all four groups of people, 66% agree with the statement, whereas 19% don’t, and 15% are on the fence. As Meatloaf would no doubt agree, two out of three ain’t bad, but it is hardly a “consensus”.


Lanzamiento del libro “Generación APP” en Centro para la Vida y la Familia, 2 de octubre

Lanzamiento del libro “Generación APP” en Centro para la Vida y la Familia, 2 de octubre.

generacionapp

Los cambios de paradigma siempre provocan miedo, incertidumbre, desazón. Cuando apareció la imprenta se pensó que los seres humanos perderían la memoria; cuando surgió la televisión, los más pesimistas auguraron la muerte de la radio. Pero nada de eso pasó…

Generación App de Mónica Bulnes revisa una de las grandes preocupaciones sociales: el efecto que tendrá el uso masivo de internet y las redes sociales en las relaciones interpersonales y en la formación de niños y adolescentes. Es normal ver a jóvenes sumidos en las pantallas, pendientes de sus teléfonos y ansiosos por revisar su computador o tablet con el fin de no perderse nada, lo que genera enorme inquietud en padres que no saben cómo guiar o educar a sus hijos en este nuevo contexto. ¿Cómo entender estas nuevas formas de relacionarse? ¿Cómo educar al adolescente y advertirle de los peligros y bondades de la tecnología? Esta nueva entrega de la psicóloga Mónica Bulnes ayudará a perderle el miedo a estos avances tecnológicos y a entender que lo que motiva a los jóvenes es lo que nos movió a todos en nuestra juventud: contactar con el otro.


Los beneficios y desventajas de los videojuegos para los niños – BioBioChile

Los beneficios y desventajas de los videojuegos para los niños – BioBioChile.

 

Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) (CC)Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) (CC)

 

Publicado por Marcial Parraguez

 

Es los tiempos actuales es muy común que los menores de edad desarrollen adicciones a los dispositivos tecnológicos. Celulares, consolas de videojuego, notebooks y tablets han pasado por encima de los clásicos regalos como las bicicletas o las muñecas, incluso por sobre el desarrollo común de un niño y su relación con el entorno.

La pregunta ahora es ¿esto es positivo o negativo? Estudios recientes han demostrado la diversidad de beneficios que tienen estos gadgets y, al mismo tiempo, los efectos negativos que podrían llegar a causar.

Muchos pasaron tardes divertidas jugando Atarai o Nintendo, otros prefirieron el fútbol o “las princesas”. Y las razones varían, desde lo económico a la posibilidad de socializar. Sin embargo, lo que produce en los niños cualquiera de estas dos actividades es algo muy distinto, según un estudio de Andrew Przybylski, psicólogo del Instituto de Internet Oxford publicado en la revista médica Health News.

En la investigación participaron más de 5.000 niños británicos de entre 10 y 15 años. Los menores debían decir el número de horas que jugaban ya sea frente a una consola o un computador.

El horario y sus efectos

¿Cuánto juegan los menores versus cuánto deberían jugar? En la investigación descubrieron que quienes pasaban menos de una hora con sus videojuegos eran “más propensos a ser felices, a ayudar y a ser emocionalmente estables”.

Por otro lado, estar tres horas o más produce un resultado totalmente diferente y perjudicial para la salud de cualquier menor. “Son más propensos a estar malhumorados, infelices y a portarse mal”, señala la publicación.

Y quienes juegan entre una hora y tres no sufren ningún efecto. De hecho, el equipo de investigación determinó que jugar dentro de esos rangos horarios no produce características positivas o negativas, y que los pequeños se desarrollan “más o menos como un niño que nunca juega”.


Tech-savvy kids, don’t become a digital obsessive like me | Keith Stuart | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Tech-savvy kids, don’t become a digital obsessive like me | Keith Stuart | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

I’m glad my sons – aged six and eight – are digitally literate and handy with a tablet. But I don’t want the tablet to use them
Boy with digital tablet
‘My own sons were smearing mashed banana all over iPad screens and Xbox controllers before they could talk.’ Photograph: Alamy

As a “tech-savvy” parent (I write about video games, for heaven’s sake), I was probably slightly less perturbed by the revelation from Ofcom’s consumer survey that six-year-olds understand more about digital technology than 45-year-olds. I actually think that’s incredibly positive. My own sons (aged six and eight) had the latest gadgets to hand from birth, due to my inability to put anything away. Their inquisitive, sticky fingers were smearing mashed banana all over iPad screens and Xbox controllers before they could talk. There have been many occasions where I’ve sat in my home office happily slaughtering enemies in Call of Duty only to turn around and find my boys staring open-mouthed from the doorway (“Daddy, what are you doing?”). Now games like Minecraft and Terraria are part of their daily lives. They text their nan, they download apps, they can take a photo and make it a smartphone wallpaper. That’s all fine; they are going to need that level of digital literacy to survive – that’s what I tell myself.

But there are some elements of my digital lifestyle that I’d rather protect them from; some routines I hope don’t become inveterate to them. I mean, imagine if their daily lives started to work like mine – a digital obsessive with a compulsive need to share everything. They wouldn’t just be able to go out into the garden for a casual kickabout – they’d need to set up a live stream over Twitch, with ongoing commentary – then edit the funny bits into a YouTube video, promoted via Twitter. Playing hide and seek in the park would involve GPS tracking. I’d think I had geo-located one of them, only to find that he’d attached his smartphone to a squirrel. I don’t want to deliver their bedtime stories via a series of Snapchat mimes.


Violence, video games and fun – a beginners' guide for parents | Technology | theguardian.com

Violence, video games and fun – a beginners’ guide for parents | Technology | theguardian.com.

The Guardian Games’ session at Camp Bestival this weekend explained some of the benefits and ground rules of video games for mystified parents

Camp Bestival performers
Not Keith Stuart and Jemima Kiss talking to Camp Bestival parents about video games Photograph: Caitlin Mogridge/Redferns via Getty Images

A festival is not a natural place to think about video games. At Camp Bestival this weekend, the sun was out, the crowds were swarming between stages; there were circus acts, acoustic sets, storytelling sessions for children. Everybody was enjoying being outside, surrounded by friends, music and the Dorset countryside – there were very few screens, apart from at the Skylanders Trap Team promotional area which drew excited kids and wary parents, mumbling to each other that they’d wanted to escape that kind of thing …

But for an hour on Sunday, in front of a surprisingly large audience at the Guardian’s tent, I talked about video games on stage with Jemima Kiss. What we wanted to do was place games in a cultural context to show how they’ve evolved, what they have to offer and why the newspaper covers them. We wanted to show that games have a place at this table.

The history of games

Sometimes people are surprised by just how long these things have been around – since 1958, in fact – so we started there. The sports sim Tennis for Two was programmed on an ancient analog computer by William Higinbotham at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. It ran on an oscilloscope screen.

From here, our talk took in landmark titles in the history of games as an industry; from Pong through to Candy Crush Saga. There was Space Invaders, which popularised the shoot-em-up genre and introduced reactive sound, the looping four-note background music speeding up as the alien invaders neared your ship. We considered Pac-Man, one of the first marketable game protagonists, which introduced the idea of merchandising to the sector.

We talked about Tetris and its perfection of “tidying up” as a game mechanic, and Street Fighter 2, and the way an error in the game’s character animation had the unexpected benefit of revolutionising the fighting game genre. Grand Theft Auto and Call of Duty, also figured, the former for kickstarting the open-world action adventure, the latter for, well, becoming the biggest entertainment franchise in the world.

Games and violence

Aware that there were lots of parents in the audience, we wanted to talk about violence. A myth I still encounter from non-players is that most games are about shooting and graphically depicted death. Actually, although shooting obviously remains a vital game mechanic, 75% of games released during 2013 were suitable for children under 16, and less than 10% were rated 18. However, we were keen to emphasise that 18 means 18; it’s not a casual suggestion, titles with this rating are absolutely unsuitable for children. Games aren’t a bogeyman but parents have a role in ensuring that children are protected from graphic violence. That’s a message people don’t often want to hear.

As for the long-term link between game and real-world violence – after 30 years of interrogation, none has been scientifically established. Research into the matter is often limited (and, arguably, flawed) in its methodology and focus; short term spikes in aggression can be given undue prominence, while meaningful studies are often misrepresented by tabloid newspapers looking for something easy to blame the latest gun tragedy on. It is impossible to apportion specific blame when violence happens – myriad socio-cultural influences are involved.


Estudio afirma que videojuegos provocan agresividad en niños y adolescentes – BioBioChile

Estudio afirma que videojuegos provocan agresividad en niños y adolescentes – BioBioChile.

 

Steve Wright Jr. (CC) FlickrSteve Wright Jr. (CC) Flickr

 

Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

Los niños y adolescentes que juegan regularmente con videojuegos tienen más pensamientos y comportamientos agresivos, según un estudio realizado con más de 3.000 participantes publicado en Estados Unidos.

El estudio fue realizado en Singapur durante un período de tres años con menores de entre 8 y 17 años, de los cuales 73% eran varones, y fue divulgado en el Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics.

Los participantes respondieron a una serie de preguntas, incluyendo el número de horas por semana frente a la consola, sus videojuegos favoritos, y si habían golpeado a alguien que los había provocado o hecho enfadar.

También se les preguntó si habían soñado a veces con golpear a alguien o hacerle daño.

“El estudio revela que el hecho de jugar a menudo con estos videojuegos violentos incrementa a largo plazo los comportamientos agresivos independientemente del sexo, la edad, el grado de agresividad inicial de los individuos y la intervención de los padres”, escribió Douglas Gentille, de la Universidad de Iowa, autor principal de los trabajos.

Los resultados ilustran los efectos de los videojuegos sobre la agresividad en todas las culturas y todas las edades, agregó.

Tanto los chicos más jóvenes como los mayores “fueron afectados de manera significativa por los videojuegos violentos y el estudio sugiere que quienes comienzan (a jugarlos) más pronto estarían más propensos a tener pensamientos agresivos”.


La nueva tendencia de agredirse anónimamente en internet – El Mostrador

La nueva tendencia de agredirse anónimamente en internet – El Mostrador.

Con frecuencia se cree que los insultos proferidos en redes sociales contra una persona son publicados por extraños. Pero se ha descubierto una práctica reciente en que la víctima también es la perpetradora. ¿De qué se trata?

bbc-nota-internet-agresiones

Una nueva tendencia en las redes tiene preocupados a padres y expertos: muchos jóvenes están publicando insultos contra sí mismos en internet aprovechando el anonimato del ciberespacio. Pero, ¿por qué lo hacen?

Informes recientes revelan que el trolling, una práctica que consiste en agredir con comentarios ofensivos a una persona en internet, es un fenómeno en aumento. Cuando las personas sufren abusos y amenazas en las redes sociales, se asume que provienen de un extraño, pero no siempre es el caso.

Según expertos en cultura informática y organizaciones no gubernamentales que se dedican al tema, el acoso cibernético infligido por la misma persona es parte de un problema que está empezando a surgir y que algunos llaman “hacerse daño digitalmente” (una traducción del inglés cyber self-harm o también self-trolling).

Las estadísticas de prevalencia son difíciles de obtener: hasta el momento sólo existe un estudio relevante al respecto. El Centro de Disminución de la Agresión de Massachusetts (MARC, por sus siglas en inglés) descubrió que de los 617 estudiantes que entrevistó, 9% había hecho alguna forma de self-trolling.