Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children? | Rowan Davies | Opinion | The Guardian

Research has found a link between ‘technoference’ and poor child behaviour. The need for light relief is very human, but perhaps we can find a happier balance

Fuente: Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children? | Rowan Davies | Opinion | The Guardian


Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian

The fear that the human brain cannot cope with the onslaught of information made possible by the latest development was first voiced in response to the printing press, back in the sixteenth century. Swap “printing press” for “internet” and you have the exact same concerns today, regularly voiced in the mainstream media, and usually focused on children.But is there any legitimacy to these claims? Or are they just needless scaremongering?

Fuente: Is the internet killing our brains? | Education | The Guardian


Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian

Don’t put your daughter on the stage, Mrs Worthington. But in 2016, what if the stage is YouTube, and your daughter (or son) is demanding to be put on it, playing Minecraft?That’s the dilemma facing a growing number of parents, whose children aren’t just watching YouTube Minecraft channels like The Diamond Minecart, Stampy and CaptainSparklez – they want to follow in their blocky footsteps.

Fuente: Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian


Parents! Focus less on worrying about Minecraft and more on understanding it | Technology | The Guardian

Parents! Focus less on worrying about Minecraft and more on understanding it | Technology | The Guardian.

Millions of kids are obsessed with Mojang’s crafting game, but understanding it rather than fearing it is a good first step for parents

Children love Minecraft, but is that something to worry about?
Children love Minecraft, but is that something to worry about? Photograph: Voisin/Phanie/Rex

A lot of people are getting hot under the collar about the BBC’s article on Minecraft, children and parenting, written by journalist Jolyon Jenkins.

Should parents ever worry about Minecraft? asks whether Minecraft is entirely healthy for kids, from addiction and lessening interest in the real world through to the prospect of “children being digitally mugged” by other players.

Jenkins clearly knows that he’ll have critics, referring to “Minecraft’s champions”, “the other side” and “the opposition” in the piece when suggesting how they might try to counter his arguments, setting this up as a battle.

At this point, as someone who writes regularly about children and technology – Minecraft included – I’m probably expected to saddle up and charge into battle, laying waste to Jenkins’ arguments.

He does make some points worth talking about in a much more balanced and less adversarial way. But my main response boils down to this: wouldn’t it be better for parents to understand Minecraft rather than worry about it?

Because once they understand the game and what their children are getting out of it, they’ll have a much better base of knowledge to make parenting decisions about and around it – from setting time limits to ensuring it’s complemented by other activities.


ADHD and the relentless internet – is there a connection? | Technology | The Guardian

ADHD and the relentless internet – is there a connection? | Technology | The Guardian.

Hyperactivity disorders are now the second most diagnosed childhood conditions in the US behind asthma, with 20% of college students sufffering

A young boy at a computer
‘Our brain grows and changes according to our experiences.’ So is the effect of the internet mimicking ADHD? Photograph: Alamy

The internet might make you feel hyperactive, but do you really have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder?

Michael Pietrus PsyD, coordinator of the ADHD assessment protocol at the University of Chicago, explains how the internet encourages behaviour that at least mimics ADHD, and can exacerbate the condition in people who have it already.

Pietrus looks after many students at the college who feel the effects of academic and social pressure. In the US, 11% of children between four and 17 now have a diagnosis of ADHD and the rates have been going up by 5% every year from 2003 to 2011. It’s now the most commonly diagnosed condition for children in the US after asthma. Twenty per cent of the US college population now have ADHD, which appears as hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity, and are at higher risk of substance abuse and self medication, depression and a host of other consequent conditions.

“People with ADHD are hardwired for novelty seeking, which until recently was an evolutionary advantage,” said Pietrus, speaking at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas. ADHD sufferers have fewer dopamine receptors, which means that a normally interesting activity seems less rewarding or even boring.

No one can explain the increase in ADHD in the US, Pietrus said. “People engage in compulsion for all sorts of reasons and often because of the way their personality extends into the online space. But compulsive behaviour is reinforced and rewarded, and that has an impact on the ability to plan and organise as well as focus on tasks and self regulate our behaviour.”


Los beneficios y desventajas de los videojuegos para los niños – BioBioChile

Los beneficios y desventajas de los videojuegos para los niños – BioBioChile.

 

Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) (CC)Leo Hidalgo (@yompyz) (CC)

 

Publicado por Marcial Parraguez

 

Es los tiempos actuales es muy común que los menores de edad desarrollen adicciones a los dispositivos tecnológicos. Celulares, consolas de videojuego, notebooks y tablets han pasado por encima de los clásicos regalos como las bicicletas o las muñecas, incluso por sobre el desarrollo común de un niño y su relación con el entorno.

La pregunta ahora es ¿esto es positivo o negativo? Estudios recientes han demostrado la diversidad de beneficios que tienen estos gadgets y, al mismo tiempo, los efectos negativos que podrían llegar a causar.

Muchos pasaron tardes divertidas jugando Atarai o Nintendo, otros prefirieron el fútbol o “las princesas”. Y las razones varían, desde lo económico a la posibilidad de socializar. Sin embargo, lo que produce en los niños cualquiera de estas dos actividades es algo muy distinto, según un estudio de Andrew Przybylski, psicólogo del Instituto de Internet Oxford publicado en la revista médica Health News.

En la investigación participaron más de 5.000 niños británicos de entre 10 y 15 años. Los menores debían decir el número de horas que jugaban ya sea frente a una consola o un computador.

El horario y sus efectos

¿Cuánto juegan los menores versus cuánto deberían jugar? En la investigación descubrieron que quienes pasaban menos de una hora con sus videojuegos eran “más propensos a ser felices, a ayudar y a ser emocionalmente estables”.

Por otro lado, estar tres horas o más produce un resultado totalmente diferente y perjudicial para la salud de cualquier menor. “Son más propensos a estar malhumorados, infelices y a portarse mal”, señala la publicación.

Y quienes juegan entre una hora y tres no sufren ningún efecto. De hecho, el equipo de investigación determinó que jugar dentro de esos rangos horarios no produce características positivas o negativas, y que los pequeños se desarrollan “más o menos como un niño que nunca juega”.