The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian

one response to his letter is to think it’s inspiring, touching, even, that there’s a billionaire out there who wants to build an “infrastructure”, a word he uses 24 times, that “prevents harm, helps during crises and rebuilds afterwards”.But here’s another response: where does that power end? Who holds it to account? What are the limits on it? Because the answer is there are none. Facebook’s power and dominance, its knowledge of every aspect of its users’ intimate lives, its ability to manipulate their – our – world view, its limitless ability to generate cash, is already beyond the reach of any government.

Fuente: Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian


Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative

Mr Arshad is one of a growing group of digital media stars who use YouTube videos, Facebook posts, tweets, photos and standup comedy to counter the barrage of extremist propaganda online — particularly from social media-savvy terrorist groups such as Isis. His YouTube series, which tackles issues facing Muslim youth in London, has been watched more than 73m times. One video, “I’m a Muslim, not a terrorist” has been screened in more than 100 schools around the UK by the police.

Fuente: Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative


Facebook is Collaborating with the Israeli Government to Determine What Should be Censored

Associated Press reports today from Jerusalem that “the Israeli government and Facebook have agreed to work together to determine how to tackle incitement on the social media network.” These meetings are taking place “as the government pushes ahead with legislative steps meant to force social networks to rein in content that Israel says incites violence.” In other words, Israel is about to legislatively force Facebook to censor content deemed by Israeli officials to be improper, and Facebook appears eager to appease those threats by working directly with the Israeli government to determine what content should be censored.

Fuente: Facebook is Collaborating with the Israeli Government to Determine What Should be Censored


German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian

Checking smartphones of those without passports among measures announced by the interior minister, Thomas de Maizière

Fuente: German proposals could see refugees’ phones searched by police | World news | The Guardian


Turkey’s President Survives Coup Attempt, Thanks in Part to Social Media He So Despises

The plotters failed, despite following a script that might have succeeded in the 20th century, in part because Erdogan was able to rally support for democratic rule using 21st century tools: video chat and social media.

Fuente: Turkey’s President Survives Coup Attempt, Thanks in Part to Social Media He So Despises


The racist hijacking of Microsoft’s chatbot shows how the internet teems with hate | World news | The Guardian

Microsoft was apologetic when its AI Twitter feed started spewing bigoted tweets – but the incident simply highlights the toxic, often antisemitic, side of social media

Fuente: The racist hijacking of Microsoft’s chatbot shows how the internet teems with hate | World news | The Guardian


How a team of social media experts is able to keep track of the UK jihadis | World news | The Guardian

How a team of social media experts is able to keep track of the UK jihadis | World news | The Guardian.

A Facebook posting by Collin Gordon, one of the 700 or so western fighters for Isis in the database

Another Briton had died in Syria, and back in London investigators were busy “scraping” through his online peer network for clues about fellow Islamic State (Isis) foot soldiers.

It was little surprise that Rhonan Malik knew two Canadian brothers, Gregory and Collin Gordon. After all, Twitter rumours suggested that all three had been killed in the same December air strike. More intriguing was the prodigious Facebookpresence of Collin Gordon which indicated that, shortly before becoming a jihadist, he had been “quite the party boy”.

On a labyrinthine upper floor of King’s College London is the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), the first global initiative of its type, whose offices are frequently contacted by counter-terrorism officers, hungry for information on the continuing flow of Britons to the ranks of Isis.

At 4.30pm on Thursday the centre’s researchers were assiduously examining social media “accounts of value”, noting the ongoing ripples of jubilation following the Charlie Hebdo and Paris attacks. A pseudonymous jihadist from Manchester, Abu QaQa, had said that the shootings had persuaded Isis and al-Qaida supporters to bury their differences.

“He’s saying we should be happy that jihad was made against the crusaders. It doesn’t matter that AQ and IS have been fighting each other – if it brings attacks against the west he’ll support it,” said Joseph Carter, research fellow at the ICSR.

So far the centre’s database has amassed profiles of about 700 western foreign fighters who have joined either Isis or groups such as al-Qaida’s Syrian offshoot, the al-Nusra Front. Each individual is categorised according to 72 data points, such as their birthplace or previous employment. At one point the database held the particulars of up to 90 Britons, a figure that has dwindled to around 50, largely as a consequence of coalition air strikes against Isis positions – Malik is believed to be at least the 35th Briton killed in Syria during 2014 – while a handful have simply vanished without trace from social media.


El Estado Islámico inunda las redes sociales alternativas | Diario Público

El Estado Islámico inunda las redes sociales alternativas | Diario Público.

Móvil con la bandera de ISIS en la pantalla

Móvil con la bandera de ISIS en la pantalla

DAVID BOLLERO

A finales de 2014, la ONU mostraba su preocupación por el hecho de que al menos 15.000 extranjeros procedentes de más de 80 países hubieran viajado a Siria, Irak, Somalia, Yemen y la región del Magreb y el Sahel para unirse a grupos extremistas. Se estima que una cuarta parte de los combatientes del Estado Islámico (EI) podrían ser extranjeros. Buena parte de este poder de captación se canaliza a través de las nuevas tecnologías.

El primer ministro británico, David Cameron, sugería esta misma semana la prohibición del uso de aplicaciones como Whatsapp por la dificultad de interceptar sus comunicaciones al estar cifradas y ser directamente de terminal a terminal. Si bien es verdad que el EI ha utilizado este tipo de aplicaciones no es menos cierto que desde el pasado mes de octubre el Estado Islámico desaconsejó a sus seguidores utilizarla por considerar que la NSA sí podía interceptar las comunicaciones. De esta manera, el EI encuentra recambio a Whatsapp en otros servicios de mensajería instantánea, como Kik, a través de los cuales coordina sus operaciones en el mercado negro, recluta o, incluso, organiza incursiones en primera línea de combate.

En ocasiones, las herramientas utilizadas por grupos extremistas como el EI ni siquiera se encuentran cuidadosamente ocultas; más bien al contrario, a plena luz de los internautas. El problema es que el volumen de información es tan elevado en la red que, precisamente, esa es su mejor baza para pasar inadvertidos. Es el caso de la aplicación móvil para Android que se descubrió el año pasado en Google Play: ‘The Dawn of Glad Tidings’, también conocida simplemente como ‘Dawn’.

Activa desde abril de 2014, fue descargada por miles de usuarios -se calcula que entre 5.000 y 10.000 descargas- bajo la descripción de “la aplicación que te informa sobre Siria, Irak y el mundo islámico”. Más de 600 calificaciones de la aplicación fueron de 4.9 estrellas, siendo una de las mejor posicionadas.

Una vez descargada, la aplicación tuiteaba a la cuenta del usuario –con enlaces, fotos, hashtags…- y, por ejemplo, el día que el EI se hizo con la ciudad de Mosul –la segunda ciudad de Irak- se registraron cerca de 40.000 tuits desde la aplicación.

Cuando el EI se hizo con
la ciudad de Mosul, se registraron cerca de 40.000 tuits desde la aplicación.

Una presencia en Twitter que, además, se refuerza utilizando cuentas como @ActiveHashtags que publica en árabe los trending topics (TT). Asimismo, estos grupos extremistas abren continuamente cuentas similares que únicamente publican contenido yihadista, consiguiendo cientos de retuits por tuit y, ya no sólo postear los principales TT sino, además, crearlos.

Manual ante una cuenta cerrada

Los esfuerzos por identificar estas cuentas y cancelarlas por parte de las principales redes como Facebook, Twitter e, incluso, YouTube se han intensificado, especialmente, desde la primera emisión del vídeo que mostraba la decapitación del periodista James Foley con campañas como #ISISmediablackout. Lo mismo sucede con otras redes como Tumblr, Flickr, SoundCloud o Instagram (y clones móviles como Iphoneogram).

Sin embargo, en los diversos foros yihadistas circulan recomendaciones sobre lo que hay que hacer cuando una cuenta es cancelada. Entre estos consejos, además de hackear los medios occidentales, figuran diversificar las redes, redirigiendo seguidores a canales distintos a Twitter o subiendo vídeos a canales diferentes a los de YouTube. Además, desde el EI animan a configurar servidores alternativos para dar salida a sus publicaciones, ampliando las aplicaciones más allá de la polaca Just Paste. Mixlr se perfila como otra de las bazas multimedia para el EI, brindando la oportunidad de emitir y sintonizar transmisiones en directo de audio.

Redes descentralizadas

Como alternativa a Twitter, los terroristas han dado con Quitter, donde también sufren el cierre de cuentas con son detectadas por el sistema. Del mismo modo, los yihadistas encuentras en redes como la rusa VKontakte una alternativa a Facebook. No es la única, puesto que existen otras alternativas como la árabe Gulpup o las de código abierto Friendica y especialmente Diaspora por su mayor calado, que también se han convertido en una vehículo de propagando y reclutamiento para el Estado Islámico.

Diaspora es una red sin ánimo de lucro que, a diferencia de otras redes sociales, no tiene sus servidores centralizados sino repartidos en una red de podmins, esto es, administradores de pods, como se denomina al servidor web personal de un usuario, que puede albergar múltiples cuentas. Es su responsabilidad eliminarlas o no, algo a lo que se anima desde Diaspora, pero sobre lo que no se toma acción directa por lo que el EI puede desarrollar su comunidad de adeptos más fácilmente.

Preguntas y respuestas

Otros métodos seguidos por el Estado Islámico para reclutar seguidores son las webs del tipo de la letona Ask.fm, donde los usuarios lanzan preguntas y otros las responden. El EI habría hecho uso de páginas como ésta para identificar a los reclutas más jóvenes y extender la propaganda. Informes del MEMRI (The Middle East Media Research Institute) revelan incluso cómo, dado que el portal no realiza ningún tipo de monitorización del contenido subido por los usuarios, un tal Abu Abdullah –que en Twitter llegó a operar como @Al_Brittani- habría viajado a Siria vía Turquía para unirse al Estado Islámico y habría respondido preguntas acerca de la yihad, armas, combatir o de cómo viajar a Siria, entre otras.

Estas técnicas, como sucede con las producciones ‘hollywoodienses’ de algunos de sus vídeos, persiguen aparecerse como una causa atractiva a los potenciales candidatos aliados, sin olvidar la amplificación de su mensaje. Complementando este planteamiento, el EI cuenta con su propia publicación, DABIQ, cuyos números pueden descargarse fácilmente desde diversas páginas web y están especialmente dirigidas a los musulmanes occidentales.


Unión Europea planea crear grupo de expertos en lucha contra propaganda yihadista – BioBioChile

Unión Europea planea crear grupo de expertos en lucha contra propaganda yihadista – BioBioChile.


Unión Europea | Wikimedia (cc)

Unión Europea | Wikimedia (cc)

Publicado por Catalina Díaz | La Información es de Agencia AFP
La Unión Europea planea crear en Bélgica una célula de expertos que podría asesorar a los países miembros para luchar contra la propaganda yihadista, indicó al periódico belga Le Soir un alto funcionario de la UE.

“La idea es que haya en Bélgica una célula de expertos capaz de aportar a los países de Europa respuestas inmediatas ante un problema de comunicación muy serio”, declaró al periódico el coordinador europeo de lucha contra el terrorismo, Gilles de Kerchove.

Las redes sociales se han convertido en un importante instrumento de reclutamiento de los grupos yihadistas. Así, la organización Estado Islámico (EI) ha difundido varios videos mostrando decapitaciones de rehenes occidentales.

Los expertos que participan en este proyecto piloto ofrecerán elementos “contranarrativos” y otros mensajes para combatir la propaganda del EI y otros grupos yihadistas, afirmó Kerchove.


Isis in duel with Twitter and YouTube to spread extremist propaganda | World news | The Guardian

Isis in duel with Twitter and YouTube to spread extremist propaganda | World news | The Guardian.

Guardian investigation reveals subterfuge used by social media arm of Islamic State to hijack topics to spread jihadi views
An Isis propaganda video
An Isis propaganda video. The group’s media arm is using slick and fast techniques to spread its content online, Photograph: Screengrab/YouTube

Propaganda operatives from Islamic State (Isis) are piggybacking on popular internet hashtags and forums to secure the widest distribution of their videos, in an increasingly devious game of cat and mouse with police and internet companies, the Guardian can reveal.

An analysis of one of the most recent Isis video distributions shows the variety of techniques being used – including latching on to the huge interest in the Scottish independence referendum – to boost distribution of their extremist material on Twitter and YouTube.

The sophisticated strategies have prompted law enforcement agencies to work closer than ever with the world’s largest tech and social media companies to try to win the propaganda war. A specialist British police squad is working with companies including Twitter and YouTube to block and delete about 1,100 pieces of gruesome content a week, which they say contravene UK terror laws. The vast majority of the material – 800 items a week – relates to Syria and Iraq.

Officers from the UK’s counter-terrorism internet referral unit (CTIRU) acknowledge they are up against a slick and fast-moving dissemination of propaganda and much of the material being targeted involves suspending Twitter accounts or taking down videos of murder, torture, combat scenes, sniper attacks and suicide missions.


EE UU ‘torpedea’ la propaganda yihadista | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU ‘torpedea’ la propaganda yihadista | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Washington lanza un vídeo a través de su campaña en el que muestra las atrocidades del EI

Fotograma del vídeo de EE UU sobre las atrocidades del EI

El campo de batalla es Twitter. Ahí, la actividad del Departamento de Estado estadounidense es frenética. Y tiene pocas cortapisas. En uno de sus 17 tuits publicados el viernes con el hashtag (hilo de comunicación de esta red) #thinkagainturnaway, la sección de comunicación y contraterrorismo informa de que ya hay combatientes sirios que dicen no al Estado Islámico (EI) porque “asesinan a musulmanes”. La foto que acompaña muestra a un yihadista descargando su rifle contra hombres no uniformados.

Think again turn away (Piénsalo de nuevo y date la vuelta) es el nombre de la campaña lanzada hace un año por esta sección de contraterrorismo, dirigida por el exdiplomático de origen cubano Alberto Fernández, y que este fin de semana ha sacudido las redes con un vídeo de un minuto en el que con ironía da la bienvenida a los que quieran adentrarse en el califato del EI. Con imágenes sacadas de cintas editadas y publicadas por el aparato de propaganda de los yihadistas, el Departamento de Estado alerta: “Corre, no camines hacia la tierra del EI”.

Tal es la brutalidad del montaje hecho por Washington (voladura de mezquitas, crucifixiones, cabezas cortadas) que YouTube, donde estaba alojado, decidió bloquearlo, como hace con muchas producciones yihadistas.

La guerra en Internet entre yihadistas, servicios de inteligencia y plataformas de contenidos es la guerra del ratón y el gato. Si el perfil de Twitter vinculado al EI @wilaiat_Halab2 es “suspendido”, sólo hace falta cambiar el último número y volver al frente. Según fuentes policiales españolas, esta cuenta, con raíz en Alepo (Siria), está vinculada a la división del EI en Nínive, provincia iraquí con capital en Mosul, bastión de su califato. El actual relevo de este perfil es @wilaiat_Halab5.


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


Una tormenta islamista en Twitter | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Una tormenta islamista en Twitter | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Los yihadistas que atacan Irak manejan un fuerte aparato de propaganda en las redes

“¡¡Allahuakbar!! (Dios es el más grande)”, dice uno de los tuits delhashtag #AllEyesOnISIS —22.400 entradas en 24 horas—, “hemos logrado nuestra tormenta en Twitter”. Lo firma el internauta@Ramzi_Ashami, que aprovecha las fotos de su perfil para dejar clara su simpatía por Al Qaeda. La lluvia de apoyo en la red de microblogs al Estado Islámico de Irak y el Levante (EIIL) no es precisamente fina. Hay tormenta. Y a las frases de afinidad con la causa del grupo yihadista que está atacando el noroeste de Irak se unen las fotos llegadas de todo el mundo con pancartas, papeles o banderas exhortando a los radicales a seguir con su empresa.Embedded image permalink