Ciberguerra: cuando el arma más poderosa es un ejército de hackers

La ciberguerra ha dejado de ser una excentricidad reservada a actos aislados, a pequeñas cosas. Las nuevas tecnologías forman parte de los civiles y sus ejércitos. Y atacarlas se ha puesto a la par de la guerra convencional.

Fuente: Ciberguerra: cuando el arma más poderosa es un ejército de hackers


¿Qué tenía el trabajo universitario que provocó una alerta de seguridad porque equivalía a “exportar armas nucleares a un gobierno hostil”? – El Mostrador

¿Por qué una agencia de espías de Estados Unidos no quería que los universitarios discutieran su trabajo en público? El caso es que no lograron acallarlos y, gracias a ello, tenemos la web.

Fuente: ¿Qué tenía el trabajo universitario que provocó una alerta de seguridad porque equivalía a “exportar armas nucleares a un gobierno hostil”? – El Mostrador


El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador

Tres académicos renunciaron a organizar un seminario sobre temas de seguridad e inteligencia, porque sospechan que una editorial ligada a la actividad pueda ser usada como pantalla por espías del Kremlin. “Cambridge es un maravilloso lugar de teorías conspirativas pero la idea de que haya un complot maquiavélico es ridículo”, dijo Neil Kent, uno de los principales impulsores del evento.

Fuente: El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador


UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat

“The connectivity that is at the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims deniably,” said Mr Younger. “They do this through means as varied as cyber attacks, propaganda or subversion of democratic process.”

Fuente: UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat


If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

What’s the CIA’s brilliant plan for stopping Russian cyber-attacks on the US and their alleged interference with the US election? Apparently, some in the agency want to escalate tensions between the two superpowers even more and possibly do the same thing right back to them.

Fuente: If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian

Shares183Save for laterThe FBI has arrested a National Security Agency contractor on suspicion of the theft of top secret classified data and documents in an alleged security breach at the same intelligence agency whose spy secrets were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Fuente: NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian


El MI6 contratará casi mil espías para combatir el terrorismo – El Mostrador

Según afirmaciones de Younger publicadas por The Times el mundo digital “representa una amenaza porque los que se oponen a nosotros pueden utilizar esta capacidad para tener acceso a nuestras actividades, lo que significa que tenemos que cambiar completamente la forma en que hacemos las cosas”.

Fuente: El MI6 contratará casi mil espías para combatir el terrorismo – El Mostrador


The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing

in the heart of the tranquil English countryside, is the National Security Agency’s largest overseas spying base. Originally used to monitor Soviet communications through the Cold War, its focus has since dramatically shifted, and today it is a vital part of the NSA’s sprawling global surveillance network.

Fuente: The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing


How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide

As part of an ongoing effort to “exploit medical intelligence,” the National Security Agency teamed up with the military-focused Defense Intelligence Agency to extract “medical SIGINT” from the intercepted communications of nonprofit groups starting in the early 2000s, a top-secret document shows.

Fuente: How the U.S. Spies on Medical Nonprofits and Health Defenses Worldwide


Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian

An Israeli technology company has been accused of creating and supplying an aggressive interception program capable of taking over Apple’s iPhones and turning them into remote spying devices, after it was allegedly used to target a Middle Eastern human rights activist and others.

Fuente: Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian


Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks' malware checklist / Boing Boing

Boing Boing is proud to publish two original documents disclosed by Edward Snowden, in connection with “Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Extraordinary Rendition,” a short story …

Fuente: Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks’ malware checklist / Boing Boing


Netanyahu's Spying Denials Contradicted by Secret NSA Documents – The Intercept

Netanyahu’s Spying Denials Contradicted by Secret NSA Documents – The Intercept.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yesterday vehemently denied aWall Street Journal report, leaked by the Obama White House, that Israel spied on U.S. negotiations with Iran and then fed the intelligence to Congressional Republicans. His office’s denial was categorical and absolute, extending beyond this specific story to U.S.-targeted spying generally, claiming: “The state of Israel does not conduct espionage against the United States or Israel’s other allies.”

Featured photo - Netanyahu’s Spying Denials Contradicted by Secret NSA Documents

Israel’s claim is not only incredible on its face. It is also squarely contradicted by top-secret NSA documents, which state that Israel targets the U.S. government for invasive electronic surveillance, and does so more aggressively and threateningly than almost any other country in the world. Indeed, so concerted and aggressive are Israeli efforts against the U.S. that some key U.S. government documents — including the top secret 2013 intelligence budget — list Israel among the U.S.’s most threatening cyber-adversaries and as a “hostile” foreign intelligence service.


US accuses Israel of spying on nuclear talks with Iran | World news | The Guardian

US accuses Israel of spying on nuclear talks with Iran | World news | The Guardian.

Israel denies Wall Street Journal reports that it shared confidential information from talks with members of the US Congress in attempt to derail any deal

Israeli foreign minister Avigdor Lieberman
The Israeli foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, denied the Wall Street Journal report: ‘We reached a decision a long time ago not to spy on the US.’ Photograph: Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images

The US has accused Israel of spying on international negotiations over Iran’s nuclear programme and using the intelligence gathered to persuade Congress to undermine the talks, according to a report on Tuesday.

The Wall Street Journal cited senior administration officials as saying the Israeli espionage operation began soon after the US opened up a secret channel of communications with Tehran in 2012, aimed at resolving the decade-long standoff over Iran’s nuclear aspirations.

The apparent decision by the White House to leak the allegations is the latest symptom of the growing gulf between Barack Obama’s administration and Binyamin Netanyahu’s government over the Iran talks, in which the Israeli leader suspects US officials of being ready to make too many concessions at the expense of Israeli security. Intelligence analysts suggested that the leak reflects the degree of anger in Washington at Netanyahu’s actions, and could mark a more serious blow to the already tottering relationship.

The leak has come exactly a week before a deadline for the US-Iranian negotiations in Lausanne to produce a framework agreement.

According to the report, the US has long been aware that Israel is among the shortlist of countries with the most aggressive intelligence operations targeting America, alongside Russia, China and France. It said American diplomats attending the talks in Austria and Switzerland were briefed by US counterintelligence officials about the threat of Israeli eavesdropping. It also raised the possibility that Israel gathered intelligence about the US position by spying on other participants in the negotiations, from western Europe, Russia, China or Iran. US intelligence had previously provided help to the Israelis to spy on the Iranians, the report said.

The US also conducts intelligence operations against Israel, and learned of the Israeli spying operation when it intercepted communication between Israeli officials exchanging classified information that US intelligence believed could only have been acquired by espionage.

However, what appears to have upset administration officials more than the spying is the use of the classified intelligence acquired to brief members of the US Congress and to persuade them to torpedo the talks. After Netanyahu addressed Congress this month, 47 Republican senators wrote an open letter to the Iranian leadership, warning it that a successor to Obama could refuse to honour any agreement reached.

“It is one thing for the US and Israel to spy on each other. It is another thing for Israel to steal US secrets and play them back to US legislators to undermine US diplomacy,” the Wall Street Journal quoted a senior US official as saying.


Former NSA director: Charlie Hebdo attack was 'kind of inevitable' | US news | The Guardian

Former NSA director: Charlie Hebdo attack was ‘kind of inevitable’ | US news | The Guardian.

 

The ex-CIA and NSA chief, Michael Hayden. Photograph: Jim Young/Reuters

 

 

The former NSA director general Michael Hayden said the Charlie Hebdo attack was “kind of inevitable” on Tuesday, and compared Islamist extremism to Ebola.

 

“The fact of the matter is there’s a plague and people are going to get Ebola,” he said.

 

Speaking at the New America Foundation, a Washington-based thinktank, Hayden said: “I don’t know that this was a question or flaw of intelligence sharing, in fact I know that the individuals have shown up on American radars as well as French radars.”

“Most folks like me view the Charlie Hebdo type attacks as kind of inevitable,” he continued, before paradoxically suggesting that no terrorist attacks need happen.


British refusal to cooperate with spy inquiry causes row in Germany | World news | The Guardian

British refusal to cooperate with spy inquiry causes row in Germany | World news | The Guardian.

Angela Merkel Angela Merkel, the German chancellor. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Downing Street and the German chancellery are embroiled in a worsening dispute over intelligence-sharing and the covert counter-terrorism campaign because of conflicts arising from the surveillance scandals surrounding the US National Security Agency and Britain’s GCHQ.

According to German newspaper reports citing government and intelligence officials in Berlin, the Bundestag’s inquiry into the NSA controversy is being jeopardised by Britain’s refusal to cooperate and its threats to break off all intelligence-sharing with Berlin should the committee reveal any UK secrets.

The weekly magazine Focus reported last month that a national security aide to David Cameron had written to Peter Altmaier, Angela Merkel’s chief of staff, refusing all requests for help in the inquiry and warning that Britain would cease supplying terrorism-related intelligence to the Germans unless Berlin yielded.

It emerged during the NSA revelations that the Americans had hacked into Merkel’s mobile phone, generating outrage in Germany and feeding growing anti-American sentiment.

Internationally, the BND, Germany’s foreign intelligence service, is viewed as less than vigorous. In the secret war on terror, the Germans are said to be dependent on signals intelligence from the British and the Americans.


La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La reforma de la NSA se queda a medio camino un año después | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Algunos de los cambios anunciados por Obama no se han materializado

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Centro de datos de la NSA, en Utah. / RICK BOWMER (AP)

El teléfono de J. Kirk Wiebe suena desde hace unos meses con menos frecuencia. Wiebe fue uno de los primeros filtradores de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad. Tras jubilarse en 2001, denunció, junto a dos veteranos exanalistas, que la NSA tenía cada vez más acceso a datos personales. Lograron poca atención y fueron perseguidos en la justicia. Pero en junio de 2013, adquirieron notoriedad gracias a las revelaciones deEdward Snowden sobre los largos tentáculos de la NSA: empezaron a dar muchas más charlas en Estados Unidos y Europa sobre su experiencia e influencia.

“Snowden nos había visto diciendo que intentamos ir por los canales internos del Gobierno y no conseguimos nada”, subraya Wiebe en alusión a que, tras fracasar ellos, Snowden optase por filtrar secretos a la prensa en vez de formular una queja interna en la NSA.

Pero ahora, al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo. “La excitación ha bajado un poco, pero a la gente sigue sin gustarle [la NSA]”, agrega en una entrevista telefónica Wiebe, de 70 años, 30 de ellos en la agencia. La percepción pública sobre la NSA apenas ha variado: en octubre de 2013, un 54% tenía una opinión favorable; en enero de este año, un 51% (sobre todo jóvenes), según una encuesta del centro Pew.

Al año y medio de las filtraciones de Snowden y al año de anunciarse la reforma de los programas de vigilancia, se habla mucho menos del joven exanalista refugiado en Rusia y del espionaje masivo

Sin embargo, buena parte del debate en EE UU sobre los límites de la recopilación masiva de datos ha quedado eclipsado. El contexto ha cambiado, lo que puede propiciar retrocesos: crecen las voces que, ante el auge del yihadismo, se oponen a restringir los programas de vigilancia, y reclaman que las autoridades tengan plenos poderes para desbloquear la encriptación de teléfonos móviles.

La reforma de la NSA se ha quedado, por ahora, a medio camino. En enero de 2014, el presidente de EE UU, Barack Obama, anunció un conjunto de cambios para limitar la interceptación de datos sin mermar la protección de la seguridad nacional. Su objetivo era atenuar las preocupaciones de ciudadanos estadounidenses y gobiernos extranjeros aliados sobre posibles injerencias a la privacidad.


Enough with the Sony hack. Can we all calm down about cyberwar with North Korea already? | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Enough with the Sony hack. Can we all calm down about cyberwar with North Korea already? | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Yes, the Interview was just a Seth Rogen stoner movie – and, no, privacy, free speech and World War III are not at stake

the interview movie poster
“We will respond proportionally,” Obama said on Friday. Why should the US be responding offensively at all? Photograph: Sony Pictures

The sanest thing anyone said in Washington this week was a reminder, on the Friday before Christmas, when Barack Obama took a break from oscillating between reassuring rationality and understated fear to make an accidental joke:

It says something about North Korea that it decided to mount an all-out attack about a satirical movie … starring Seth Rogen.

It also says something about the over-the-top rhetoric of United States cybersecurity paranoia that it took the President of the United States to remind us to take a deep breath and exhale, even if Sony abruptly scrapped its poorly reviewed Hollywood blockbuster after nebulous threats from alleged North Korean hackers.

Unfortunately, acting rational seems out of the question at this point. In between making a lot of sense about Sony’s cowardly “mistake” to pull a film based on a childish, unsubstantiated threat, Obama indicated the US planned to respond in some as-yet-unknown way, which sounds a lot like a cyberattack of our own.

“We will respond, we will respond proportionally, and in a place and time that we choose,” Obama said at his year-end news conference. Why should we be responding offensively at all? As the Wall Street Journal’s Danny Yadron reported, a movie studio doesn’t reach the US government’s definition of “critical infrastructure” that would allow its military to respond under existing rules, but that didn’t stop the White House from calling the Sony hack a “national security issue” just a day later.

Let’s put aside for a moment that many security experts haven’t exactly been rushing to agree with the FBI’s cut-and-dry conclusion that “the North Korean government is responsible” for the hack. Wired’s Kim Zetter wrote a detailed analysis about why the evidence accusing North Korea is really flimsy, while other security professionals have weighed in with similar research.

But whoever the hackers are, can we stop calling them “cyber-terrorists,”like Motion Picture Association of America chairman Chris Dodd did on Friday? They may be sadistic pranksters, extortionists and assholes, but anonymously posting a juvenile and vague word jumble incorporating “9/11” that has no connection to reality does not make them terrorist masterminds. That’s giving whoever did it way too much credit.


Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

“Depende directamente de la situación internacional”, asegura el presidente ruso

 

 

El presidente ruso habla sobre mejorar la seguridad en internet / Reuters-Live

Los ciberataques contra recursos informativos de Rusia se han multiplicado en los últimos tiempos y “perfeccionan” sus “métodos, medios y táctica”, según afirmó el miércoles el presidente Vladímir Putin, al iniciar una sesión especial del Consejo de Seguridad dedicada a “cuestiones relacionadas con la defensa del espacio informativo de Rusia de las amenazas modernas”. Los temas en cuestión tienen, según dijo, una “importancia excepcional para la capacidad de defensa del país, el desarrollo sostenible de la economía, la esfera social y la defensa de la soberanía de Rusia en el sentido más amplio”.

En la alocución difundida en la página de web del Kremlin, Putin no dio cifras, pero el secretario del Consejo de Seguridad, Nikolái Pátrushev, citado por la agencia Interfax, dijo que desde 2010 han sido registrados y rechazados más de 90 millones de ciberataques contra recursos rusos, de los cuales 57 millones ocurrieron durante la primera mitad de este año y estuvieron relacionados con temas como la Olimpiada de Sochi y la situación en Ucrania. En 2010, se registraron 3,3 millones de ataques.

La intensidad de los ciberataques “depende directamente de la situación internacional”, afirmó Putin, quien instó a tener en cuenta los “riesgos y amenazas” en el campo de la información. “Países aislados intentan utilizar su posición dominante en el espacio informativo global para lograr no solo sus fines económicos, sino militares y políticos”, subrayó el líder ruso, según el cual “desde principios del año pasado se está formando el sistema estatal para detectar, prevenir y liquidar las secuelas de los ataques cibernéticos a los recursos informativos de Rusia”.


Los correos del jefe negociador de la paz en Colombia fueron espiados | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Los correos del jefe negociador de la paz en Colombia fueron espiados | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Humberto de la Calle denuncia que accedieron a su computador personal y teléfono móvil

Humberto de la Cale durante una conferencia de prensa el miércoles. / AFP

Al menos en 17 oportunidades han intentado acceder al computador de Humberto de la Calle, el jefe negociador del Gobierno colombiano que está al frente de los diálogos de paz que se entablan con la guerrilla delas FARC desde noviembre de 2012. “Autoridades en Colombia me informan que hechos recientes demuestran que operaciones ilegales lograron infiltrar mis comunicaciones electrónicas”, dice una declaración de De la Calle, que se encuentra en La Habana, donde ahora se discute cómo resarcir a más de seis millones de víctimas que ha dejado el conflicto armado interno.

De la Calle denunció, sin citar a los responsables y sin dar mayores detalles de la información a la que accedieron, que con el ingreso a sus cuentas personales se tiene la capacidad “de enviar mensajes” a su nombre que “jamás” ha escrito. También dijo que las comunicaciones a través de su teléfono móvil pudieron ser infiltradas y que siguen apareciendo cuentas y perfiles falsos en redes sociales que tampoco le pertenecen.


Charges of China’s military hacking into corporate America piling up | Ars Technica

Charges of China’s military hacking into corporate America piling up | Ars Technica.

US appears powerless to bring Chinese soldier hackers to justice.

China’s military broke into Pentagon contractors’ computer networks at least 50 times—hacks that threaten “to erode US military technical superiority,” according to a federal investigation.

The Senate Arms Services Committee found that nearly two dozen intrusions were of the well-orchestrated “advanced persistent threat” variety. The yearlong probe [PDF] blamed the Chinese government for hacks targeting civilian transportation companies that the US military employs for the movement of troops and equipment. According to the investigation, hackers from the People’s Liberation Army started in 2012 and put malware onto an airline’s computers, stealing computer codes, e-mail, documents, and user accounts from firms the government declined to name.

“These peacetime intrusions into the networks of key defense contractors are more evidence of China’s aggressive actions in cyberspace,” said committee chairman Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.)

The latest developments follow a June report from US security firm CrowdStrike that detailed allegations of hacking by the People’s Liberation Army into aerospace, satellite, and defense companies in Europe, Japan, and the US. What’s more, Attorney General Eric Holder said in May that “enough is enough” at a news conference when he announced the indictment of five Chinese military personnel accused of hacking into major US corporations and stealing trade secrets.

While Holder promised to bring the five to the US for trial, the Associated Press reported Wednesday that the defendants “are believed to be living freely” in China. The targeted companies, ranging from Alcoa to Westinghouse, were allegedly attacked between 2006 to 2014, and China got away with trade secrets connected to everything from nuclear to renewable energy, according to the indictment.


How the NSA Helped Turkey Kill Kurdish Rebels – The Intercept

How the NSA Helped Turkey Kill Kurdish Rebels – The Intercept.

BY  AND Featured photo - How the NSA Helped Turkey Kill Kurdish Rebels

 

On a December night in 2011, a terrible thing happened on Mount Cudi, near the Turkish-Iraqi border. One side described it as a massacre; the other called it an accident.

Several Turkish F-16 fighter jets bombed a caravan of villagers that night, apparently under the belief that they were guerilla fighters with the separatist Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK). The group was returning from northern Iraq and their mules were loaded down with fuel canisters and other cargo. They turned out to be smugglers, not PKK fighters. Some 34 people died in the attack.

An American Predator drone flying overhead had detected the group, prompting U.S. analysts to alert their Turkish partners.

The reconnaissance flight—which was first reported by the Wall Street Journal in 2012—and its tragic consequences provided an important insight into the very tight working relationship between American and Turkish intelligence services in the fight against Kurdish separatists. Although the PKK is still considered a terrorist organization by the United States and the European Union, its image has been improved radically by its recent success in fighting ISIS in northern Iraq and Syria. PKK fighters—backed by U.S. airstrikes—are on the front lines against the jihadist movement there, and some in the West are now advocating arming the group and lifting its terrorist label.

Documents from the archive of U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden thatDer Spiegel and The Intercept have seen show just how deeply involved America has become in Turkey’s fight against the Kurds. For a time, the NSA even delivered its Turkish partners with the mobile phone location data of PKK leaders on an hourly basis. The U.S. government also provided the Turks with information about PKK money flows, and the whereabouts of some of its leaders living in exile abroad.

At the same time, the Snowden documents also show that Turkey is one of the United States’ leading targets for spying. Documents show that the political leadership in Washington, D.C., has tasked the NSA with divining Turkey’s “leadership intention,” as well as monitoring its operations in 18 other key areas. This means that Germany’s foreign intelligence service, which drew criticism in recent weeks after it was revealed it had been spying on Turkey, isn’t the only secret service interested in keeping tabs on the government in Ankara.


Cash, Weapons and Surveillance: the U.S. is a Key Party to Every Israeli Attack – The Intercept

Cash, Weapons and Surveillance: the U.S. is a Key Party to Every Israeli Attack – The Intercept.

By 885
Featured photo - Cash, Weapons and Surveillance: the U.S. is a Key Party to Every Israeli Attack U.S. President Barack Obama (L) greets Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a press conference on March 20, 2013 in Jerusalem, Israel. Photo credit: Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images

The U.S. government has long lavished overwhelming aid on Israel, providing cash, weapons and surveillance technology that play a crucial role in Israel’s attacks on its neighbors. But top secret documents provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden shed substantial new light on how the U.S. and its partners directly enable Israel’s military assaults – such as the one on Gaza.

Over the last decade, the NSA has significantly increased the surveillance assistance it provides to its Israeli counterpart, the Israeli SIGINT National Unit (ISNU; also known as Unit 8200), including data used to monitor and target Palestinians. In many cases, the NSA and ISNU work cooperatively with the British and Canadian spy agencies, the GCHQ and CSEC.

The relationship has, on at least one occasion, entailed the covert payment of a large amount of cash to Israeli operatives. Beyond their own surveillance programs, the American and British surveillance agencies rely on U.S.-supported Arab regimes, including the Jordanian monarchy and even the Palestinian Authority Security Forces, to provide vital spying services regarding Palestinian targets.

The new documents underscore the indispensable, direct involvement of the U.S. government and its key allies in Israeli aggression against its neighbors. That covert support is squarely at odds with the posture of helpless detachment typically adopted by Obama officials and their supporters.

President Obama, in his press conference on Friday, said ”it is heartbreaking to see what’s happening there,” referring to the weeks of civilian deaths in Gaza – “as if he’s just a bystander, watching it all unfold,” observed Brooklyn College Professor Corey Robin. Robin added: ”Obama talks about Gaza as if it were a natural disaster, an uncontrollable biological event.”

Each time Israel attacks Gaza and massacres its trapped civilian population – at the end of 2008, in the fall of 2012, and now again this past month – the same process repeats itself in both U.S. media and government circles: the U.S. government feeds Israel the weapons it uses and steadfastly defends its aggression both publicly and at the U.N.; the U.S. Congress unanimously enacts one resolution after the next to support and enable Israel; and then American media figures pretend that the Israeli attack has nothing to do with their country, that it’s just some sort of unfortunately intractable, distant conflict between two equally intransigent foreign parties in response to which all decent Americans helplessly throw up their hands as though they bear no responsibility.


Israel spied on John Kerry during failed peace talks – report | World news | The Guardian

Israel spied on John Kerry during failed peace talks – report | World news | The Guardian.

  • Der Spiegel says Israelis eavesdropped on phone calls
  • State Department offers no comment
john kerry
The US secretary of state, John Kerry, speaks on his phone at Ramstein air base in Germany on Friday. Photograph: Lucas Jackson/AP

Israel spied on the US secretary of state, John Kerry, during peace talks with Palestinians and Arab states last year, the magazine Der Spiegelhas reported.

The German weekly said on Sunday that Israeli intelligence and at least one other secret service intercepted Kerry’s phone calls during a doomed, nine-month effort to broker a peace deal.

If confirmed, the report will further sour the diplomat’s relationship with Binyamin Netanyahu’s government and raise fresh questions about the vulnerability of phone communications to eavesdropping.

There was no immediate reaction from Jerusalem or Washington. The State Department did not respond to a request for comment.


White House: racial slurs in NSA intelligence material 'unacceptable' | World news | theguardian.com

White House: racial slurs in NSA intelligence material ‘unacceptable’ | World news | theguardian.com.

FBI and NSA to review policy after leaked documents suggest training materials referred to targets using offensive language

 

 

NSA HQ in Fort Meade, Maryland
It is at least the second time the White House has ordered a review of agency training materials said to include offensive language. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

 

The White House has instructed US security agencies to review their training and policy materials for racial or religious bias after documents leaked by Edward Snowden showed training material for the intelligence agencies referring to “Mohammed Raghead”.

After an extensive investigation by the Intercept on Wednesday reported that the NSA and the FBI spied on the emails of five prominent US activists and attorneys with Muslim backgrounds, White House spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said that the administration took accusations of the slurs “extremely seriously.”

“Upon learning of this matter, the White House immediately requested that the director of national intelligence undertake an assessment of intelligence community policies, training standards or directives that promote diversity and tolerance, and as necessary, make any recommendations changes or additional reforms,” Hayden said.

It is at least the second time the White House has ordered a review of agency training materials said to include offensive language.

The Intercept cited the “Mohammed Raghead” epithet as a placeholder for a target in a surveillance training document from 2005.

Vanee Vines, a spokeswoman for the NSA, said that she would not comment on “the authenticity of any leaked material,” but said the NSA “has not, and would not, approve official training documents that include insulting or inflammatory language. Any use of racial or ethnic stereotypes, slurs, or other similar language by employees is both unacceptable and inconsistent with NSA policy and core values.”

Hayden declined to provide additional detail on the scope or duration of the investigation. But it is reminiscent of an earlier incident in which the White House ordered the government’s vast counter-terrorism apparatus to find and purge inflammatory training material, particularly that which singled out Muslims for particular scrutiny.

In 2011, this reporter published FBI training material instructing newer counter-terrorism agents that Islam itself was a threat to US national security and compared the prophet Muhammad to a cult leader. Initial FBI pushback gave way to an inquiry, at the instruction of the White House, that removed significant quantities of offensive or imprecise training material.


Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy | Technology | The Guardian

Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy | Technology | The Guardian.

Thanks to Edward Snowden, we know the apparatus of repression has been covertly attached to the democratic state. However, our struggle to retain privacy is far from hopeless

US National Security Agency
The US National Security Agency threat operations centre in Fort Meade, Maryland, in 2006. Photograph: Paul Richards/AFP/Getty Images

In the third chapter of his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon gave two reasons why the slavery into which the Romans had tumbled under Augustus and his successors left them more wretched than any previous human slavery. In the first place, Gibbon said, the Romans had carried with them into slavery the culture of a free people: their language and their conception of themselves as human beings presupposed freedom. And thus, says Gibbon, for a long time the Romans preserved the sentiments – or at least the ideas – of a freeborn people. In the second place, the empire of the Romans filled all the world, and when that empire fell into the hands of a single person, the world was a safe and dreary prison for his enemies. As Gibbon wrote, to resist was fatal, and it was impossible to fly.

The power of that Roman empire rested in its leaders’ control of communications. The Mediterranean was their lake. Across their European empire, from Scotland to Syria, they pushed roads that 15 centuries later were still primary arteries of European transportation. Down those roads the emperor marched his armies. Up those roads he gathered his intelligence. The emperors invented the posts to move couriers and messages at the fastest possible speed.

Using that infrastructure, with respect to everything that involved the administration of power, the emperor made himself the best-informed person in the history of the world.

That power eradicated human freedom. “Remember,” said Cicero to Marcellus in exile, “wherever you are, you are equally within the power of the conqueror.”

The empire of the United States after the second world war also depended upon control of communications. This was more evident when, a mere 20 years later, the United States was locked in a confrontation of nuclear annihilation with the Soviet Union. In a war of submarines hidden in the dark below the continents, capable of eradicating human civilisation in less than an hour, the rule of engagement was “launch on warning”. Thus the United States valued control of communications as highly as the Emperor Augustus. Its listeners too aspired to know everything.

We all know that the United States has for decades spent as much on its military might as all other powers in the world combined. Americans are now realising what it means that we applied to the stealing of signals and the breaking of codes a similar proportion of our resources in relation to the rest of the world.

The US system of listening comprises a military command controlling a large civilian workforce. That structure presupposes the foreign intelligence nature of listening activities. Military control was a symbol and guarantee of the nature of the activity being pursued. Wide-scale domestic surveillance under military command would have violated the fundamental principle of civilian control.

Instead what it had was a foreign intelligence service responsible to the president as military commander-in-chief. The chain of military command absolutely ensured respect for the fundamental principle “no listening here”. The boundary between home and away distinguished the permissible from the unconstitutional.

The distinction between home and away was at least technically credible, given the reality of 20th-century communications media, which were hierarchically organised and very often state-controlled.

When the US government chose to listen to other governments abroad – to their militaries, to their diplomatic communications, to their policymakers where possible – they were listening in a world of defined targets. The basic principle was: hack, tap, steal. We listened, we hacked in, we traded, we stole.

In the beginning we listened to militaries and their governments. Later we monitored the flow of international trade as far as it engaged American national security interests.


Microsoft presiona a China tras prohibición de Windows 8 en computadoras del gobierno – BioBioChile

Microsoft presiona a China tras prohibición de Windows 8 en computadoras del gobierno – BioBioChile.

 

Windows 8 | MicrosoftWindows 8 | Microsoft

 

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

Microsoft dijo el martes que mantiene sus esfuerzos para obtener la aprobación por parte de China de su sistema operativo Windows 8, luego de que el país prohibiera su uso en las computadoras del gobierno.

“Nos sorprendimos al conocer la referencia a Windows 8 en esta prohibición”, escribió la compañía en un comunicado.

“Microsoft ha trabajado de manera activa con el Centro de Adquisición del Gobierno Central y otras agencias estatales a través del proceso de evaluación para asegurarse que nuestros productos y servicios reúnen los requisitos legales” exigidos, añadió.

“Hemos dado y seguiremos dando Windows 7 a clientes gubernamentales. Al mismo tiempo, estamos trabajando en la evaluación de Windows 8 con agencias relevantes del gobierno”.

La prohibición de Pekín fue anunciada luego de que en Estados Unidos se presentaran cargos contra cinco miembros de una unidad secreta militar china por supuesto espionaje de secretos comerciales a compañías estadounidenses, lo que sugiere una creciente batalla del comercio tecnológico.


Pekín endurece su protesta contra los cargos de ciberespionaje a militares chinos | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Pekín endurece su protesta contra los cargos de ciberespionaje a militares chinos | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

REUTERS-LIVE!

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China ha convocado al embajador estadounidense en Pekín, Max Baucus, para protestar de manera oficial contra la presentación de cargos por parte de un gran jurado de EEUU contra cinco militares chinos, acusados de ciberespionaje contra empresas del país norteamericano. La reacción del Gobierno chino, al que el anuncio estadounidense sorprendió apenas horas antes de inaugurar en Shanghai un foro de seguridad y cooperación para Asia en el que participan también, entre otros, el presidente ruso Vladímir Putin y el jefe de Estado iraní Hasan Rohaní, no se hizo esperar.

Un comunicado en la página web del Ministerio de Exteriores chino indicaba que el viceministro Zheng Zeguang transmitió a Baucus, quien apenas lleva dos meses en el cargo, la protesta “solemne” de su Gobierno contra una acción que ha perjudicado gravemente los lazos bilaterales y contra la que China puede tomar aún más medidas.

El lunes, Pekín ya había anunciado su retirada del grupo de trabajo China-EEUU para la ciberseguridad

El lunes, Pekín ya había anunciado su retirada del grupo de trabajo China-EEUU para la ciberseguridad. En Washington, el embajador chino también transmitía un mensaje similar a las autoridades estadounidenses. Por su parte, el Ministerio de Defensa chino rechazaba tajantemente las acusaciones contra sus militares y acusaba, en un comunicado de su portavoz Geng Yansheng, a EEUU de “hipocresía y doble rasero”.

“Desde hace largo tiempo, las autoridades de EEUU utilizan una tecnología e infraestructura avanzadas para llevar a cabo ciberespionaje y tareas de vigilancia sobre dignatarios y empresas extranjeras”, señala el comunicado del Ministerio de Defensa, que alude a los cables diplomáticos filtrados por Wikileaks y a las denuncias deEdward Snowden. El ex contratista de los servicios de seguridad estadounidenses ha asegurado, entre otras cosas, que EEUU entró en los ordenadores de Huawei, el gigante de las telecomunicaciones chino al que Washington acusa, sin haberlo probado aún, de mantener vínculos con el Ejército Popular de Liberación chino. Las terminales de los ordenadores militares chinos, asegura Geng, han sufrido un alto número de ciberataques provenientes del extranjero, de los cuales una cifra “considerable” provienen de EEUU.


A Global Campaign to Monitor the "Digital Weapons" Trade | TechPresident

A Global Campaign to Monitor the “Digital Weapons” Trade | TechPresident.

BY Carola Frediani | Tuesday, April 8 2014

A map from the CAUSE website shows where surveillance technology has been sold to countries with spotty human rights records.

It might seem that there is little connection between Milan and the atrocities occurring in Syria under the regime of President Bashar al-Assad but we now know that a little known Italian tech company called Area SpA was providing Assad with technology that could virtually allow him to seize and search any e-mail that passed through the country. Unfortunately, such an example is now fairly commonplace: Vodafone in Egypt, as well as Siemens and Nokia in Iran, to name a few.

Though Area SpA later announced it was curtailing its surveillance project in Syria, in an alarming trend, surveillance technology companies, many of them in western countries with decent human rights records are selling such technology to countries with fairly sinister ones. This problem, which some activists have called the “digital arms trade” is global and complex in nature and is at the heart of a new global campaign launched on April 4 by an international group of leading NGOs. They banded together to create the Coalition Against Unlawful Surveillance Exports (CAUSE), calling for governments to take action on the international trade in communication surveillance technologies.

The group — which includes Amnesty International, Digitale Gesellschaft, the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), Human Rights Watch, the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute, Privacy International, and Reporters without Borders — wants governments and private companies to tackle the proliferation and abuse of these technologies across the world, since they are more often than not used to violate their citizens’ right to privacy, free speech and a host of other human rights. World leaders are responsible for keeping such invasive surveillance systems and technologies out of the hands of dictators and oppressive regimes, said the coalition’s organizers.

“What is unique about the CAUSE coalition are the groups that are part of it,” Mike Rispoli, Communication Manager of UK-based Privacy International, says to techPresident. “You have organizations like Privacy International, as well as Open Technology Institute or Digitale Gesellschaft, that focus on technology, digital rights, etc., but you also have more traditional human rights groups like Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and Reporters without Borders. The reason why this is so important is that there’s a broad recognition that surveillance technologies pose significant threat to the enjoyment of rights around the world, not just the right to privacy but also freedom of expression.”

What exactly do these technologies do? There is malware that allows surreptitious data extraction from personal devices such as phone and PCs; tools that can intercept telecommunications traffic; spygear that geolocates mobile phones and can therefore track their owners; monitoring systems that allow authorities to track entire populations; and devices used to tap undersea fiber optic cables to enable NSA-style internet monitoring and filtering.


Foreign Officials In the Dark About Their Own Spy Agencies' Cooperation with NSA – The Intercept

Foreign Officials In the Dark About Their Own Spy Agencies’ Cooperation with NSA – The Intercept.

By 
Featured photo - Foreign Officials In the Dark About Their Own Spy Agencies’ Cooperation with NSAGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel

One of the more bizarre aspects of the last nine months of Snowden revelations is how top political officials in other nations have repeatedly demonstrated, or even explicitly claimed, wholesale ignorance about their nations’ cooperation with the National Security Agency, as well as their own spying activities. This has led to widespread speculation about the authenticity of these reactions: Were these top officials truly unaware, or were they pretending to be, in order to distance themselves from surveillance operations that became highly controversial once disclosed?

In Germany, when Der Spiegel first reported last June that the NSA was engaged in mass spying aimed at the German population, Chancellor Angela Merkel and other senior officials publicly expressed outrage – only for that paper to then reveal documents showing extensive cooperation between the NSA and the German spy agency BND. In the Netherlands, a cabinet minister was forced to survive a no-confidence vote after he admitted to having wrongfully attributed the collection of metadata from 1.8 million calls to the NSA rather than the Dutch spying agency.

In the UK, Chris Huhne, a former cabinet minister and member of the national security council until 2012, insisted that ministers were in “utter ignorance” about even the largest GCHQ spying program, known as Tempora, “or its US counterpart, the NSA’s Prism,” as well as “about their extraordinary capability to hoover up and store personal emails, voice contact, social networking activity and even internet searches.”

A similar controversy arose in the U.S., when the White House claimed that President Obama was kept unaware of the NSA’s surveillance of Merkel’s personal cell phone and those of other allied leaders. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein claimed the same ignorance, while an unnamed NSA source told a German newspaper that the White House knew.

A new NSA document published today by The Intercept sheds considerable light on these questions. The classified document contains an internal NSA interview with an official from the SIGINT Operations Group in NSA’s Foreign Affairs Directorate. Titled “What Are We After with Our Third Party Relationships? — And What Do They Want from Us, Generally Speaking?”, the discussion explores the NSA’s cooperative relationship with its surveillance partners. Upon being asked whether political shifts within those nations affect the NSA’s relationships, the SIGINT official explains why such changes generally have no effect: because only a handful of military officials in those countries are aware of the spying activities. Few, if any, elected leaders have any knowledge of the surveillance.

Are our foreign intelligence relationships usually insulated from short-term political ups and downs, or not?

(S//SI//REL) For a variety of reasons, our intelligence relationships are rarely disrupted by foreign political perturbations, international or domestic. First, we are helping our partners address critical intelligence shortfalls, just as they are assisting us. Second, in many of our foreign partners’ capitals, few senior officials outside of their defense-intelligence apparatuses are witting to any SIGINT connection to the U.S./NSA [emphasis added].

 


El Ejército colombiano niega haber realizado escuchas ilegales | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El Ejército colombiano niega haber realizado escuchas ilegales | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Doce días después de haberse destapado el escándalo de las supuestas escuchas ilegales a los negociadores de paz con las FARCpor parte de miembros del Ejército, un informe presentado en la noche del viernes al presidente Juan Manuel Santos por el general Ernesto Maldonado, Inspector del Ejército, asegura que la creación de la fachada de inteligencia militar desde la que presuntamente se espiaron a los negociadores fue legal. Según Maldonado, su funcionamiento estaba “soportado” en órdenes de operaciones emitidas por un comandante de batallón de inteligencia, así como por rubros autorizados por la ley.


Obama elimina la recopilación masiva de datos y el espionaje a líderes aliados | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Obama elimina la recopilación masiva de datos y el espionaje a líderes aliados | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

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En un esfuerzo por conciliar la protección de la seguridad y los intereses nacionales de Estados Unidos con el derecho a la privacidad de los ciudadanos, Barack Obama anunció este viernes una reforma del espionaje norteamericano que incluye la progresiva eliminación del programa de almacenamiento masivo de datos telefónicos y la prohibición de la vigilancia de las comunicaciones de los jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de países amigos y aliados.

Como respuesta al escándalo provocado por las revelaciones de Edward Snowden, Obama ha ordenado la revisión de los actuales métodos de recopilación de información por parte de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional (NSA) con el fin de garantizar un mayor control judicial y reducir los riesgos de un uso inapropiado de una actividad que debe estar exclusivamente dedicada a la persecución de los enemigos y la prevención de las amenazas ciertas de un ataque terrorista.

Obama ha reconocido que los programas, tal como se ejecutan actualmente, pueden suponer un peligro para las libertades civiles y entrar en contradicción con los derechos constitucionales de los norteamericanos o de los extranjeros que viven en este país

El plan anunciado por el presidente, después de varios meses de revisión y consulta con el Congreso y la comunidad de inteligencia, no representa un cambio radical de las actuales prácticas de espionaje ni añade modificaciones sorprendentes. Pero sí reconoce que esos programas, tal como se ejecutan actualmente, pueden suponer un peligro para las libertades civiles y entrar en contradicción con los derechos constitucionales de los norteamericanos o de los extranjeros que viven en este país.

En referencia particular a larecolección masiva de números y llamadas telefónicas –la más controvertida de las filtraciones de Snowden, lo que se conoce en el seno de la NSA como Sección 215-, Obama admitió, pese a elogiar su eficacia en el pasado, que “este tipo de programa puede ser utilizado para obtener más información sobre nuestras vidas privadas y abre la puerta a otros programas más intrusivos”.

El presidente reconoció también que su propia palabra o las de otros funcionarios públicos de que esos programas no se usan para fines distintos a los confesados no es suficiente para dar garantías a la población. “Dado el poder excepcional del Estado, no es suficiente que sus líderes digan: créanme, no abusamos de los datos que recogemos. Nuestra libertad no puede depender de las buenas intenciones de quienes están en el poder, sino de la ley que restringe ese poder”.


Obama presents NSA reforms with plan to end government storage of call data | World news | The Guardian

Obama presents NSA reforms with plan to end government storage of call data | World news | The Guardian.

• President stops short of ending controversial bulk collection
• Obama assures allied foreign leaders on NSA surveillance
• Reforms also include added Fisa court safeguards

Obama at Justice Department
President Obama speaks about the National Security Agency and intelligence agencies surveillance techniques. Photograph: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

US president Barack Obama forcefully defended the embattled National Security Agency on Friday in a speech that outlined a series of surveillance reforms but stopped well short of demanding an end to the bulk collection of American phone data.

In his widely anticipated address at the Justice Department on the future course of US surveillance policy, Obama said the government should no longer hold databases of every call record made in the United States, citing the “potential for abuse”.

But Obama did not say what should replace the databases and made it clear the intelligence agencies should still be able to access call records information in some unspecified way, signalling a new round in the battle between privacy advocates and the NSA’s allies.

Mounting a forceful defence of the NSA, Obama said: “They’re not abusing authorities in order to listen to your private phone calls, or read your emails.” He did not mention that judges on the secret surveillance court have found NSA has repeatedly and “systematically” overstepped its bounds. Instead, he counselled strongly against any steps that would undermine US national security. “We cannot unilaterally disarm our intelligence agencies,” he said.

Obama’s remarks were bound to give the beleaguered NSA a boost of confidence, while disappointing civil libertarians who wanted to hear the president defend the privacy of American citizens more emphatically.


NSA 'hacking unit' infiltrates computers around the world – report | World news | The Guardian

NSA ‘hacking unit’ infiltrates computers around the world – report | World news | The Guardian.

• NSA: Tailored Access Operations a ‘unique national asset’
• Former NSA chief calls Edward Snowden a ‘traitor’

Average reading time: 6m

 

A hacker's silhouette

Der Spiegel reported that TAO’s areas of operation range from counter-terrorism to cyber attacks. Photograph: Getty Images

 

A top-secret National Security Agency hacking unit infiltrates computers around the world and breaks into the toughest data targets, according to internal documents quoted in a magazine report on Sunday.

Details of how the division, known as Tailored Access Operations (TAO), steals data and inserts invisible “back door” spying devices into computer systems were published by the German magazine Der Spiegel.

The magazine portrayed TAO as an elite team of hackers specialising in gaining undetected access to intelligence targets that have proved the toughest to penetrate through other spying techniques, and described its overall mission as “getting the ungettable”. The report quoted an official saying that the unit’s operations have obtained “some of the most significant intelligence our country has ever seen”.

NSA officials responded to the Spiegel report with a statement, which said: “Tailored Access Operations is a unique national asset that is on the front lines of enabling NSA to defend the nation and its allies. [TAO’s] work is centred on computer network exploitation in support of foreign intelligence collection.”


Las operaciones inconfesables de la CIA en España | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Las operaciones inconfesables de la CIA en España | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Jaled el Masri (izquierda), en la Audiencia Nacional en 2006. / CLAUDIO ÁLVAREZ

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España es una base de operaciones sucias de la CIA hasta ahora sin consecuencias para los espías que operan aquí en secreto, cometiendo delitos y burlando la ley, según aseguran las fuentes consultadas entre la policía y los jueces españoles. Los 13 agentes de la Agencia Central de Inteligencia implicados en el secuestro del ciudadano alemán Jaled el Masri, de origen libanés, pueden respirar tranquilos. Su caso, después de varios años de investigación judicial, está a punto de archivarse.


EEUU advierte sobre documentos de Snowden con material sensible para otros países – BioBioChile

EEUU advierte sobre documentos de Snowden con material sensible para otros países – BioBioChile.

 

Mw238 (CC) | FlickrMw238 (CC) | Flickr

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

Estados Unidos ha advertido a los servicios de inteligencia de otros países de que los documentos obtenidos por Edward Snowden contienen información sobre cómo otras capitales cooperan en secreto con Washington, publicó el jueves un periódico.

Según The Washington Post, algunas de las decenas de miles de documentos extraídos por el ex agente de inteligencia estadounidense contienen material sensible sobre programas extranjeros de recopilación de información contra países como Irán, Rusia y China.


Cameron se desmarca de sus socios y enarbola su apoyo a Washington | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Cameron se desmarca de sus socios y enarbola su apoyo a Washington | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

ampliar foto

David Cameron y Angela Merkel, hoy, en Bruselas. / YVES HERMAN (AFP)

Mientras los líderes de Francia, Alemania, Italia e incluso España muestran su indignación por las escuchas protagonizadas por los servicios de investigación estadounidenses, Reino Unido hace alarde de su relación privilegiada con Washington. Ni Londres ha sido víctima del espionaje que han sufrido otras capitales, ni quiere saber nada de ninguna entente europea que exija explicaciones a EE UU. “Tenemos servicios de inteligencia y los vamos a mantener. Criticaré a los que publican su trabajo porque eso ayuda a nuestros enemigos. Así de simple”, ha dicho tajante el primer ministro británico, David Cameron.

“El señor Snowden [el analista de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA) que ha revelado las escuchas generalizadas] y algunos periódicos que lo publican van a hacer mucho más difícil mantener a nuestros países y a nuestra gente a salvo”, ha señalado el líder conservador tras el fin de la cumbre europea en la que Alemania y Francia han sacado adelante una iniciativa que en los dos próximos meses debería restaurar la confianza que las dos capitales europeas tienen en el Gobierno estadounidense. Las revelaciones, en fin, “no ayudarán a hacer el mundo más seguro, sino más peligroso”, ha resumido.


La UE afirma que el espionaje de EE UU puede dañar la cooperación en seguridad | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La UE afirma que el espionaje de EE UU puede dañar la cooperación en seguridad | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

VÍDEO: REUTERS-LIVE! / FOTO: AP

Mientras aún resuenan los ecos de la petición franco-alemana de un nuevo marco de colaboración con los servicios de espionaje estadounidenses, los líderes de la UE siguen reunidos en este segundo día de cumbre en Bruselas. Este jueves, en un comunicado, los Veintiocho alertaron a Estados Unidos que el espionaje llevado a cabo por la NSA contra líderes europeos puede hacer que se pierda la confianza entre Europa y Washington, “lo que perjudicaría la necesaria colaboración en la recogida de inteligencia”. Los países europeos colaboran con EE UU en temas de seguridad, especialmente en la lucha antiterrorista.


Inside the mind of NSA chief Gen Keith Alexander | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Inside the mind of NSA chief Gen Keith Alexander | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

A lavish Star Trek room he had built as part of his ‘Information Dominance Center’ is endlessly revealing

It has been previously reported that the mentality of NSA chief Gen. Keith Alexander is captured by his motto “Collect it All”. It’s a get-everything approach he pioneered first when aimed at an enemy population in the middle of a war zone in Iraq, one he has now imported onto US soil, aimed at the domestic population and everyone else.

But a perhaps even more disturbing and revealing vignette into the spy chief’s mind comes from a new Foreign Policy article describing what the journal calls his “all-out, barely-legal drive to build the ultimate spy machine”. The article describes how even his NSA peers see him as a “cowboy” willing to play fast and loose with legal limits in order to construct a system of ubiquitous surveillance. But the personality driving all of this – not just Alexander’s but much of Washington’s – is perhaps best captured by this one passage, highlighted by PBS’ News Hour in a post entitled: “NSA director modeled war room after Star Trek’s Enterprise”. The room was christened as part of the “Information Dominance Center”:

“When he was running the Army’s Intelligence and Security Command, Alexander brought many of his future allies down to Fort Belvoir for a tour of his base of operations, a facility known as the Information Dominance Center. It had been designed by a Hollywood set designer to mimic the bridge of the starship Enterprise from Star Trek, complete with chrome panels, computer stations, a huge TV monitor on the forward wall, and doors that made a ‘whoosh’ sound when they slid open and closed. Lawmakers and other important officials took turns sitting in a leather ‘captain’s chair’ in the center of the room and watched as Alexander, a lover of science-fiction movies, showed off his data tools on the big screen.

“‘Everybody wanted to sit in the chair at least once to pretend he was Jean-Luc Picard,’ says a retired officer in charge of VIP visits.”


Flame, el código malicioso más complejo para ciberespiar

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2012/05/28/actualidad/1338218887_695257.html

Los 600 ordenadores afectados se encuentran en Irán, Israel, Palestina, Siria, Sudán y Egipto

El patógeno informático podría llevar cinco años en circulación, según Kaspersky

La empresa de seguridad en Internet Karspersky, con sede en Moscú, ha detectado el virus Flame, diseñado para recopilar y robar información estratégica. Se trata del software de espionaje más complejo que se ha descubierto, y ha estado funcionando al menos durante cinco años, según la compañía. La mayoría de los ordenadores afectados, Kaspersky ha detectado unos 600, se encuentra en Irán, Israel, Palestina y Siria, seguidos de otros países de fuera de esa región, como Sudán.