Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian

one response to his letter is to think it’s inspiring, touching, even, that there’s a billionaire out there who wants to build an “infrastructure”, a word he uses 24 times, that “prevents harm, helps during crises and rebuilds afterwards”.But here’s another response: where does that power end? Who holds it to account? What are the limits on it? Because the answer is there are none. Facebook’s power and dominance, its knowledge of every aspect of its users’ intimate lives, its ability to manipulate their – our – world view, its limitless ability to generate cash, is already beyond the reach of any government.

Fuente: Mark Zuckerberg says change the world, yet he sets the rules | Carole Cadwalladr | Opinion | The Guardian


Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian

We have to take action now to root out Russian and other foreign influences before they become too deeply enmeshed in our political ecosystem. First and foremost, leaders in the US and Europe must stop any attempt by the Trump administration to ease sanctions on Russia. It must be abundantly clear that attacking our elections through cyberspace will prompt a tough and proportional response.

Fuente: Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian


Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian

Alisa Shevchenko is a talented young Russian hacker, known for working with companies to find vulnerabilities in their systems. She is also, the White House claims, guilty of helping Vladimir Putin interfere in the US election.

Fuente: Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian


Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative

Mr Arshad is one of a growing group of digital media stars who use YouTube videos, Facebook posts, tweets, photos and standup comedy to counter the barrage of extremist propaganda online — particularly from social media-savvy terrorist groups such as Isis. His YouTube series, which tackles issues facing Muslim youth in London, has been watched more than 73m times. One video, “I’m a Muslim, not a terrorist” has been screened in more than 100 schools around the UK by the police.

Fuente: Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative


Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian

An Israeli technology company has been accused of creating and supplying an aggressive interception program capable of taking over Apple’s iPhones and turning them into remote spying devices, after it was allegedly used to target a Middle Eastern human rights activist and others.

Fuente: Israeli firm accused of creating iPhone spyware | World news | The Guardian


Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com

The bill, signed by Vladimir Putin, Russian president, last week requires telecoms companies to store all text and voice messages, as well as all images, sound and video, transmitted via Russia on servers in the country for up to six months. They are also required to store metadata — information about when and from where messages were sent — for three years.

Fuente: Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com


ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador

Laborde insistió en la importancia de avanzar en el intercambio de información entre los servicios de inteligencia de los gobiernos para acelerar lo más posible la detección de individuos potencialmente peligrosos.En esa misma línea, abogó por profundizar los lazos entre la comunidad internacional y las grandes empresas tecnológicas para “ganar la batalla de la información y la interconexión”.

Fuente: ONU teme más atentados si intensifica guerra contra terrorismo en Siria e Irak – El Mostrador


Snowden Debates CNN’s Fareed Zakaria on Encryption

NSA whistleblower and privacy advocate Edward Snowden took part in his first public debate on encryption on Tuesday night, facing off against CNN’s Fareed Zakaria, a journalist and author known for his coverage of international affairs.

Fuente: Snowden Debates CNN’s Fareed Zakaria on Encryption


Karim the AI delivers psychological support to Syrian refugees | Technology | The Guardian

More than 1 million Syrians have fled to Lebanon since the start of the conflict and as many as one-fifth of them may be suffering from mental health disorders, according to the World Health Organisation.But Lebanon’s mental health services are mostly private and the needs of refugees – who may have lost loved ones, their home, livelihood and community – are mostly going unmet.Hoping to support the efforts of overworked psychologists in the region, the Silicon Valley startup X2AI has created an artificially intelligent chatbot called Karim that can have personalised text message conversations in Arabic to help people with their emotional problems.

Fuente: Karim the AI delivers psychological support to Syrian refugees | Technology | The Guardian


US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com

US warns of risks from deeper encryption – FT.com.

 

Jeh Johnson©Getty

Jeh Johnson

The head of the US Department of Homeland Security has warned the cyber security industry that encryption poses “real challenges” for law enforcement.

In a speech at a cyber security conference, RSA in San Francisco, Jeh Johnson called on the industry to find a solution that protected “the basic physical security of the American people” and the “liberties and freedoms we cherish”.

“The current course on deeper and deeper encryption is one that presents real challenges for those in law enforcement and national security,” he said.He said he understood the importance of encryption for privacy but asked the audience to imagine what it would have meant for law enforcement if, after the invention of the telephone, all the police could search was people’s letters.

Mr Johnson’s comments echo those of FBI director James Comey who called on Congress last year to stop the rise of encryption where no one held a key and so law enforcement agencies could not unlock it.

In the UK, the director of GCHQ criticised US technology companies last year for becoming “the command and control networks of choice” for terrorists by protecting communications. Across Europe, police forces have become concerned by their inability to track the communications of people who plan to travel to the Middle East to join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis).

 


Former NSA director: Charlie Hebdo attack was 'kind of inevitable' | US news | The Guardian

Former NSA director: Charlie Hebdo attack was ‘kind of inevitable’ | US news | The Guardian.

 

The ex-CIA and NSA chief, Michael Hayden. Photograph: Jim Young/Reuters

 

 

The former NSA director general Michael Hayden said the Charlie Hebdo attack was “kind of inevitable” on Tuesday, and compared Islamist extremism to Ebola.

 

“The fact of the matter is there’s a plague and people are going to get Ebola,” he said.

 

Speaking at the New America Foundation, a Washington-based thinktank, Hayden said: “I don’t know that this was a question or flaw of intelligence sharing, in fact I know that the individuals have shown up on American radars as well as French radars.”

“Most folks like me view the Charlie Hebdo type attacks as kind of inevitable,” he continued, before paradoxically suggesting that no terrorist attacks need happen.


How you could become a victim of cybercrime in 2015 | Technology | The Guardian

How you could become a victim of cybercrime in 2015 | Technology | The Guardian.

Cybersecurity experts’ predictions for the year ahead: from ransomware and healthcare hacks to social media scams and state-sponsored cyberwar

Will 2015 be a happy new year for cybercriminals?
 Will 2015 be a happy new year for cybercriminals? Photograph: Alamy

Will 2015 be a happy new year for internet users? Not if cybercriminals have their way.

Online security companies have been making their predictions for 2015, from the malware that will be trying to weasel its way onto our computers and smartphones to the prospect of cyberwar involving state-sponsored hackers.

Here’s a summary of what you should be watching out for online in 2015, based on the predictions of companies including BitDefender, KPMGAdaptiveMobile,Trend MicroBAE SystemsWebSenseInfoSec InstituteSymantecKaspersky,Proofpoint and Sophos. The links lead to their full predictions.


La UE insta a los gigantes de la Red a combatir el terrorismo ‘online’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La UE insta a los gigantes de la Red a combatir el terrorismo ‘online’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

La Unión Europea tratará hoy de persuadir a los gigantes de Internet para que colaboren contra la que considera su mayor amenaza: los yihadistas europeos. Los ministros de Interior de los 28 Estados miembros y la Comisión Europea mantendrán una cena restringida con representantes de las grandes compañías tecnológicas, que los radicales utilizan en buena medida para difundir mensajes y captar adeptos. Tras ese encuentro, los responsables del Interior acelerarán sus planes para luchar de manera más intensa contra este fenómeno. Las autoridades europeas estiman que más de 3.000 combatientes comunitarios han viajado a Oriente Próximo.

Los responsables de la lucha antiterrorista han llegado a la conclusión de que no se puede combatir eficazmente a los yihadistas en Europa sin contar con la colaboración de las grandes compañías de Internet. Por ese motivo, la comisaria europea del Interior, Cecilia Malmström, y la presidencia de turno italiana del Consejo Europeo —representa a los Estados miembros— han organizado por primera vez un encuentro con el sector, según confirma a este diario un portavoz del Ejecutivo comunitario. Altos cargos de Facebook, Twitter, Google y Microsoft participarán en la cena, aseguran esas fuentes.


«Die Schweiz hätte ein Zeichen setzen können» – St.Galler Tagblatt Online

«Die Schweiz hätte ein Zeichen setzen können» – St.Galler Tagblatt Online.

Tagblatt Online, 28. Februar 2014, 10:07 Uhr

 

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Kenneth Page NGO Privacy International, London Politikverantwortlicher

 

Unternehmen haben ihre Exportgesuche für Überwachungssoftware aus der Schweiz zurückgezogen. Zufrieden?

Ja. Die Schweiz hat aber auch eine gute Chance verpasst. Die Regierung hätte viel proaktiver vorgehen und die Exportgesuche ablehnen können. Stattdessen haben die Unternehmen aus Ungeduld nun selber Entscheide gefällt. Die Schweiz hätte auf internationaler Ebene ein viel stärkeres Zeichen setzen können, indem sie die wachsenden Menschenrechtsbedenken gegenüber diesen Technologien anerkannt hätte. Zumal das Land dieses Jahr den OSZE-Vorsitz innehat.

 

Werden einige dieser Unternehmen nun Überwachungstechnik ohne Erlaubnis exportieren?

 

Sie brauchen eine Lizenz, um aus der Schweiz zu exportieren. Ansonsten würden sie Exportvorschriften verletzen. Einige Unternehmen haben aber Büros in anderen europäischen Ländern und können unter einer Gesetzgebung arbeiten, die ihnen passt. Die Firma Gamma zum Beispiel hat regionale Büros in Malaysia, den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten, Singapur oder Libanon. Es ist zudem wichtig, sich nicht allein auf diese Firmen zu fokussieren, da die Technologie oft über strategische Geschäftspartnerschaften verkauft wird.