Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian

The move comes after its international director, Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, was arrested at Heathrow airport in November for refusing to hand over passwords. Rabbani, 35, has been detained at least 20 times over the past decade when entering the UK, under schedule 7 of terrorism legislation that provides broad search powers, but this was the first time he had been arrested.

Fuente: Campaign group to challenge UK over surrender of passwords at border control | Politics | The Guardian


El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador

Tres académicos renunciaron a organizar un seminario sobre temas de seguridad e inteligencia, porque sospechan que una editorial ligada a la actividad pueda ser usada como pantalla por espías del Kremlin. “Cambridge es un maravilloso lugar de teorías conspirativas pero la idea de que haya un complot maquiavélico es ridículo”, dijo Neil Kent, uno de los principales impulsores del evento.

Fuente: El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador


UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat

“The connectivity that is at the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims deniably,” said Mr Younger. “They do this through means as varied as cyber attacks, propaganda or subversion of democratic process.”

Fuente: UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat


Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative

Mr Arshad is one of a growing group of digital media stars who use YouTube videos, Facebook posts, tweets, photos and standup comedy to counter the barrage of extremist propaganda online — particularly from social media-savvy terrorist groups such as Isis. His YouTube series, which tackles issues facing Muslim youth in London, has been watched more than 73m times. One video, “I’m a Muslim, not a terrorist” has been screened in more than 100 schools around the UK by the police.

Fuente: Social media: Challenging the jihadi narrative


El MI6 contratará casi mil espías para combatir el terrorismo – El Mostrador

Según afirmaciones de Younger publicadas por The Times el mundo digital “representa una amenaza porque los que se oponen a nosotros pueden utilizar esta capacidad para tener acceso a nuestras actividades, lo que significa que tenemos que cambiar completamente la forma en que hacemos las cosas”.

Fuente: El MI6 contratará casi mil espías para combatir el terrorismo – El Mostrador


The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing

in the heart of the tranquil English countryside, is the National Security Agency’s largest overseas spying base. Originally used to monitor Soviet communications through the Cold War, its focus has since dramatically shifted, and today it is a vital part of the NSA’s sprawling global surveillance network.

Fuente: The NSA’s British Base at the Heart of U.S. Targeted Killing


Bulk data collection vital to prevent terrorism in UK, report finds | World news | The Guardian

The bulk collection of personal data by British spy agencies is vital in preventing terrorist attacks, an independent review of draft security legislation has found.David Anderson QC, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, concluded that laws giving MI5, MI6 and GCHQ the right to gather large volumes of data from members of the public had a “clear operational purpose”.

Fuente: Bulk data collection vital to prevent terrorism in UK, report finds | World news | The Guardian


Search engines’ role in radicalisation must be challenged, finds study | Technology | The Guardian

Although the UK government’s Prevent strategy claims the internet must not be ungoverned space for Islamist extremism and British diplomats have taken the lead in the global communications fight against Islamic State on the net, the study suggests government agencies are only at the beginning of a “labyrinthine challenge”. So-called counter-narrative initiatives led by governments and civil society groups are “under-resourced and not achieving sufficient natural interest”, suggesting the battle of ideas is not even being engaged, let alone won.

Fuente: Search engines’ role in radicalisation must be challenged, finds study | Technology | The Guardian


Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks' malware checklist / Boing Boing

Boing Boing is proud to publish two original documents disclosed by Edward Snowden, in connection with “Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Extraordinary Rendition,” a short story …

Fuente: Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks’ malware checklist / Boing Boing


‘Trident is old technology’: the brave new world of cyber warfare | Technology | The Guardian

Forget debates about Britain’s nuclear deterrent. New technology means a country can be brought to its knees with the click of a mouse

Fuente: ‘Trident is old technology’: the brave new world of cyber warfare | Technology | The Guardian


GCHQ conducted illegal surveillance, investigatory powers tribunal rules | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ conducted illegal surveillance, investigatory powers tribunal rules | UK news | The Guardian.

 Documents relating to Sami al-Saadi must be destroyed, tribunal has ruled.Documents relating to Sami al-Saadi must be destroyed, tribunal has ruled. Photograph: Marco Longari/AFP

GCHQ, Britain’s national security surveillance agency, has been ordered to destroy legally privileged communications it unlawfully collected from a Libyan rendition victim.

The ruling marks the first time in its 15-year history that the investigatory powers tribunal has upheld a specific complaint against the intelligence services, lawyers have said. It is also the first time the tribunal has ordered a security service to give up surveillance material.

The IPT says GCHQ must destroy two documents which are legally privileged communications belonging to a former opponent of the Gaddafi regime, Sami al-Saadi, who was sent back to Libya in 2004 in a joint MI6-CIA “rendition” operation with his wife and four children under 12.

The tribunal, chaired by Mr Justice Burton, ruled that GCHQ must give an undertaking that parts of those documents must be “destroyed or deleted so as to render such information inaccessible to the agency in the future”. The agency has to submit a secret report within 14 days confirming that the destruction has been carried out.

GCHQ has also been ordered to hand over a hard copy of the papers to the interception of communications commissioner within seven days. They will be kept safe for five years in case there are further legal proceedings or an inquiry.

The tribunal says that although the two documents contain information covered by legal privilege they did not disclose or refer to any legal advice: “The tribunal, after careful consideration, is [also] satisfied that there was no use or disclosure of the privileged information for the purpose of defending the civil claim brought by [Saadi] and others.”

This is a compensation claim against Jack Straw, the then foreign secretary, and the Foreign Office, being brought by Saadi along with another prominent opponent of Gaddafi, Abdel Hakim Belhaj and his family, for their role in their rendition and subsequent torture in Libya in 2004.


El “ejército de blogueros” de Vladimir Putin – El Mostrador

El “ejército de blogueros” de Vladimir Putin – El Mostrador.

21 DE MARZO DE 2015

Reciben un pago del gobierno por critica a Ucrania y a países occidentales

Cientos de miles de comentarios a favor del presidente ruso en las redes, 400 empleados, turnos de 12 horas son algunos de los detalles revelados acerca del supuesto “ciberejército” del Ejecutivo.

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En el último año se ha visto un aumento sin precedentes en las actividades de los llamados “troles del Kremlin” en Rusia.

Se trata, presuntamente, de blogueros que reciben un pago del gobierno por criticar a Ucrania y a países occidentales en las redes sociales y hacer comentarios positivos acerca del liderazgo en Moscú.

Aunque la existencia de un supuesto “ejército cibernético” no es ningún secreto, información publicada recientemente en diferentes medios revela detalles acerca del funcionamiento diario de una de las herramientas propagandísticas utilizadas por el Estado.

La Agencia de Investigación de Internet (Agentstvo Internet Issledovaniya) emplea a 400 personas y se encuentra en una ordinaria oficina en un área residencial de San Petersburgo.

Pero tras su sencilla fachada se encuentra la “guarida de los troles del Kremlin”, según un reportaje investigativo publicado por Moy Rayon (Mi Distrito), un periódico local e independiente.


British refusal to cooperate with spy inquiry causes row in Germany | World news | The Guardian

British refusal to cooperate with spy inquiry causes row in Germany | World news | The Guardian.

Angela Merkel Angela Merkel, the German chancellor. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Downing Street and the German chancellery are embroiled in a worsening dispute over intelligence-sharing and the covert counter-terrorism campaign because of conflicts arising from the surveillance scandals surrounding the US National Security Agency and Britain’s GCHQ.

According to German newspaper reports citing government and intelligence officials in Berlin, the Bundestag’s inquiry into the NSA controversy is being jeopardised by Britain’s refusal to cooperate and its threats to break off all intelligence-sharing with Berlin should the committee reveal any UK secrets.

The weekly magazine Focus reported last month that a national security aide to David Cameron had written to Peter Altmaier, Angela Merkel’s chief of staff, refusing all requests for help in the inquiry and warning that Britain would cease supplying terrorism-related intelligence to the Germans unless Berlin yielded.

It emerged during the NSA revelations that the Americans had hacked into Merkel’s mobile phone, generating outrage in Germany and feeding growing anti-American sentiment.

Internationally, the BND, Germany’s foreign intelligence service, is viewed as less than vigorous. In the secret war on terror, the Germans are said to be dependent on signals intelligence from the British and the Americans.


How a team of social media experts is able to keep track of the UK jihadis | World news | The Guardian

How a team of social media experts is able to keep track of the UK jihadis | World news | The Guardian.

A Facebook posting by Collin Gordon, one of the 700 or so western fighters for Isis in the database

Another Briton had died in Syria, and back in London investigators were busy “scraping” through his online peer network for clues about fellow Islamic State (Isis) foot soldiers.

It was little surprise that Rhonan Malik knew two Canadian brothers, Gregory and Collin Gordon. After all, Twitter rumours suggested that all three had been killed in the same December air strike. More intriguing was the prodigious Facebookpresence of Collin Gordon which indicated that, shortly before becoming a jihadist, he had been “quite the party boy”.

On a labyrinthine upper floor of King’s College London is the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR), the first global initiative of its type, whose offices are frequently contacted by counter-terrorism officers, hungry for information on the continuing flow of Britons to the ranks of Isis.

At 4.30pm on Thursday the centre’s researchers were assiduously examining social media “accounts of value”, noting the ongoing ripples of jubilation following the Charlie Hebdo and Paris attacks. A pseudonymous jihadist from Manchester, Abu QaQa, had said that the shootings had persuaded Isis and al-Qaida supporters to bury their differences.

“He’s saying we should be happy that jihad was made against the crusaders. It doesn’t matter that AQ and IS have been fighting each other – if it brings attacks against the west he’ll support it,” said Joseph Carter, research fellow at the ICSR.

So far the centre’s database has amassed profiles of about 700 western foreign fighters who have joined either Isis or groups such as al-Qaida’s Syrian offshoot, the al-Nusra Front. Each individual is categorised according to 72 data points, such as their birthplace or previous employment. At one point the database held the particulars of up to 90 Britons, a figure that has dwindled to around 50, largely as a consequence of coalition air strikes against Isis positions – Malik is believed to be at least the 35th Briton killed in Syria during 2014 – while a handful have simply vanished without trace from social media.


GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian.

 

• Snowden files reveal emails of BBC, NY Times and more
• Agency includes investigative journalists on ‘threat’ list
• Editors call on Cameron to act against snooping on media

 

GCHQ
The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by GCHQ. Photograph: GCHQ/EPA

GCHQ’s bulk surveillance of electronic communications has scooped up emails to and from journalists working for some of the US and UK’s largest media organisations, analysis of documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Emails from the BBC, Reuters, the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde, the Sun, NBC and the Washington Post were saved by GCHQ and shared on the agency’s intranet as part of a test exercise by the signals intelligence agency.

The disclosure comes as the British government faces intense pressure to protect the confidential communications of reporters, MPs and lawyers from snooping.

The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in the space of less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by one of GCHQ’s numerous taps on the fibre-optic cables that make up the backbone of the internet.

The communications, which were sometimes simple mass-PR emails sent to dozens of journalists but also included correspondence between reporters and editors discussing stories, were retained by GCHQ and were available to all cleared staff on the agency intranet. There is nothing to indicate whether or not the journalists were intentionally targeted.

The mails appeared to have been captured and stored as the output of a then-new tool being used to strip irrelevant data out of the agency’s tapping process.

New evidence from other UK intelligence documents revealed by Snowden also shows that a GCHQ information security assessment listed “investigative journalists” as a threat in a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers.


‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian

‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian.

Campaigners fear draft code of Ripa legislation will allow police sweeping powers to access phone and email records of journalists, lawyers and doctors
Armed police officers Houses of Parliament
Armed police officers inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament in London. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

An urgent campaign has been launched for a “freedom of expression” law to protect confidential journalists’, MPs’ and lawyers’ phone and communications records being secretly snooped on by the police.

Senior editors and lawyers condemned as “wholly inadequate” safeguards put forward by Theresa May in December to meet concerns over the police use of surveillance powers in a code of practice linked to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (Ripa).

The critics of the draft code fear that the police will still have sweeping powers allowing them to authorise themselves to access the phone and email records of professionals such as journalists, lawyers, doctors, MPs and priests who handle privileged, confidential information.

More than 3,000 national and regional editors are being asked to sign a joint letter from the Society of Editors and Press Gazette, the industry’s journal, condemning the Home Office joint code for failing to recognise “the overarching importance of protecting journalists’ sources”.

The campaign comes as the prime minister, David Cameron, called for an extension of the laws that give snooping powers to security services with a plan to ban encrypted messages in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo Paris attacks.


Why MI5 does not need more surveillance powers after the Paris attacks | Henry Porter | Comment is free | The Guardian

Why MI5 does not need more surveillance powers after the Paris attacks | Henry Porter | Comment is free | The Guardian.


The terrorists wanted to undermine liberty and openness. We must resist the urge to do the same
Andrew Parker, MI5 director general
MI5 director general Andrew Parker. ‘Be it monitoring the Kouachi brothers or Lee Rigby’s killers, the authorities had all the powers they needed.’ Photograph: MI5/PA

Soon after the attacks in Paris last week, the director general of MI5, Andrew Parker, said of the jihadi threat: “Whenever we lose visibility of what they are saying to each other, so our ability to understand and mitigate the threat they pose is reduced.”

Few would disagree with this sentiment, or in any way underestimate the enormous responsibility counter-terrorist agencies face after the killings, but the coded suggestion that MI5 needs further sweeping surveillance powers to track down terrorists is more controversial, because it doesn’t take into account the facts.

The Kouachi brothers were part of what is known as the Buttes-Chaumont network and were being watched, on and off, as far back as 2005. In terms of monitoring, much the same is true of the killers of Lee Rigby, Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale; the Boston bomber, Tamerlan Tsnarnaev; and the killer in the attack in Sydney late last year, Man Haron Monis. The authorities had all the powers they needed to monitor the activities of these men, both physically and electronically.

This is not to blame the agencies concerned, for it is impossible to predict the behaviour of any number of individuals – and agency resources, even in the US, are always going to be finite. The agencies have to make a call and sometimes that call will be wrong, which is all part of their extraordinarily difficult job. What is incoherent, and may be regarded as slightly opportunistic, is the agitation for new powers when they already have powers to observe and follow these individuals, and to intercept their communications.


Isis in duel with Twitter and YouTube to spread extremist propaganda | World news | The Guardian

Isis in duel with Twitter and YouTube to spread extremist propaganda | World news | The Guardian.

Guardian investigation reveals subterfuge used by social media arm of Islamic State to hijack topics to spread jihadi views
An Isis propaganda video
An Isis propaganda video. The group’s media arm is using slick and fast techniques to spread its content online, Photograph: Screengrab/YouTube

Propaganda operatives from Islamic State (Isis) are piggybacking on popular internet hashtags and forums to secure the widest distribution of their videos, in an increasingly devious game of cat and mouse with police and internet companies, the Guardian can reveal.

An analysis of one of the most recent Isis video distributions shows the variety of techniques being used – including latching on to the huge interest in the Scottish independence referendum – to boost distribution of their extremist material on Twitter and YouTube.

The sophisticated strategies have prompted law enforcement agencies to work closer than ever with the world’s largest tech and social media companies to try to win the propaganda war. A specialist British police squad is working with companies including Twitter and YouTube to block and delete about 1,100 pieces of gruesome content a week, which they say contravene UK terror laws. The vast majority of the material – 800 items a week – relates to Syria and Iraq.

Officers from the UK’s counter-terrorism internet referral unit (CTIRU) acknowledge they are up against a slick and fast-moving dissemination of propaganda and much of the material being targeted involves suspending Twitter accounts or taking down videos of murder, torture, combat scenes, sniper attacks and suicide missions.


Liam Fox calls for greater surveillance powers for security services | UK news | The Guardian

Liam Fox calls for greater surveillance powers for security services | UK news | The Guardian.

Former defence secretary says intelligence agencies must be allowed to gather more data on British citizens fighting abroad
Liam Fox

Liam Fox on the Andrew Marr Show on Sunday: ‘The whole area of intercept needs to be looked at.’ Photograph: Jeff Overs/BBC/PA

Britain’s security services may need greater powers of surveillance to monitor British citizens who have gone to join the fighting in Syria andIraq, according to the former Conservative defence secretary Liam Fox.

As further details emerged about the latest young Britons to join Sunni insurgents, Fox said that the majority of people in the UK would accept that the level of the threat meant that officials would need greater powers to intercept the communications of extremists.

“The whole area of intercept needs to be looked at,” he said. “We have got a real debate, and it is a genuine debate in a democracy, between the libertarians who say the state must not get too powerful and pretty much the rest of us who say the state must protect itself.”

Asked whether this meant more surveillance and increasing the resources for the intelligence agencies, Fox told the BBC: “If required, it is the first duty of the state to protect its citizens … it is a real worry and it is a problem that is going to be with us for a very long time. At heart it is an ideological battle and we have to realise that we have to win the ideological battle as well.”


Cameron se desmarca de sus socios y enarbola su apoyo a Washington | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Cameron se desmarca de sus socios y enarbola su apoyo a Washington | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

ampliar foto

David Cameron y Angela Merkel, hoy, en Bruselas. / YVES HERMAN (AFP)

Mientras los líderes de Francia, Alemania, Italia e incluso España muestran su indignación por las escuchas protagonizadas por los servicios de investigación estadounidenses, Reino Unido hace alarde de su relación privilegiada con Washington. Ni Londres ha sido víctima del espionaje que han sufrido otras capitales, ni quiere saber nada de ninguna entente europea que exija explicaciones a EE UU. “Tenemos servicios de inteligencia y los vamos a mantener. Criticaré a los que publican su trabajo porque eso ayuda a nuestros enemigos. Así de simple”, ha dicho tajante el primer ministro británico, David Cameron.

“El señor Snowden [el analista de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA) que ha revelado las escuchas generalizadas] y algunos periódicos que lo publican van a hacer mucho más difícil mantener a nuestros países y a nuestra gente a salvo”, ha señalado el líder conservador tras el fin de la cumbre europea en la que Alemania y Francia han sacado adelante una iniciativa que en los dos próximos meses debería restaurar la confianza que las dos capitales europeas tienen en el Gobierno estadounidense. Las revelaciones, en fin, “no ayudarán a hacer el mundo más seguro, sino más peligroso”, ha resumido.