Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.

He’ll control an unaccountable drone program, and the prison at Guantanamo Bay. His FBI, including a network of 15,000 paid informants, already has a record of spying on mosques and activists, and his NSA’s surveillance empire is ubiquitous and governed by arcane rules, most of which remain secret. He will inherit bombing campaigns in seven Muslim countries, the de facto ability to declare war unilaterally, and a massive nuclear arsenal — much of which is on hair-trigger alert.

Fuente: Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.


CIA to make sweeping structural changes with focus on cyber operations | US news | The Guardian

CIA to make sweeping structural changes with focus on cyber operations | US news | The Guardian.

 CIA headquartersA workman slides a dustmop over the floor at the Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Photograph: J Scott Applewhite/AP

CIA director John Brennan on Friday announced a major organizational overhaul of the intelligence agency, including the creation of an entirely new fifth wing to be known as the “directorate of digital innovation”.

The changes were designed to improve handling of cyber threats and the use of digital technology, streamline management, enhance recruiting and training and encourage intra-agency information sharing, Brennan said in a memo posted on the CIA website and in a briefing with reporters.

“Never has the need for the full and unfettered integration of our capabilities been greater,” Brennan said in the memo, comparing the restructuring to the agency’s post-9/11 “response to the emergence of global terrorism”.

In addition to the creation of the digital directorate, Brennan’s blueprint establishes 10 new “mission centers” to pool expertise and operations on a particular region or threat. Four longtime agency directorates – the organizational bones of the agency, historically – would remain in place, although two would take on different names.

The reorganization announced Friday follows major shifts in the CIA’s role and operations after 9/11, when the agency took up drone warfare and was reinvented, in some analyses, as a paramilitary organization.


Facebook’s outage exposes our digital fragility | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Facebook’s outage exposes our digital fragility | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Today’s Facebook suspension shows how vulnerable digital information is – penetrable by hackers, governments or subject to random failures
Facebook logo as seen on its website
‘Any electronic device is subject to failure. Any locked door invites trespass.’ Photograph: Alamy

OMG Facebook is down! Down too went Instagram. It was just for an hour this morning, but the tweets screamed “Do I have to talk to someone real?”

In a manner of speaking, yes. Despite the hackers of Lizard Squad claiming credit, it is now clear that an outage at Facebook’s HQ was responsible. But the confusion was understandable after Lizard Squad had in recent weeks variously hit Sony executives and Microsoft products. It brought down PlayStation and Xbox platforms over Christmas.

Others such as Anonymous and LulSec have hit the FBI, the CIA, Britain’s NHS and the Australian government. North Korea appears to have hacked Hollywood and American security has hacked North Korea. Similar attacks are reported between Russia and Ukraine. Cyberwar is clearly in its infancy.

Admittedly, most such attacks are through denial of service rather than data theft, but as Wikileaks and Snowden showed, the thief is always a step ahead of the cop. Digital is inherently insecure. Anyone who claims otherwise is lying. Last year the NHS sought permission to store the personal data of every patient. It promised total security and guaranteed that any patient could opt out. Nothing would pass to insurers or drugs companies.

We now know it was not secure and that requests to opt out were simply disregarded. The NHS had lied.

The same must go for the Home Office’s desire to hoover up internet and phone records for “national security”, with the material going “only to the security services and the police”. What goes to the police goes to the public.