Wikipedia founder to fight fake news with new Wikitribune site | Technology | The Guardian

Crowdfunded online publication from Jimmy Wales will pair paid journalists with army of volunteer contributors

Fuente: Wikipedia founder to fight fake news with new Wikitribune site | Technology | The Guardian


The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


Why a digital detox is bad for us | Ruth Whippman | Life and style | The Guardian

Negative emotions and anxiety exist for a reason. The rancid sense of rising terror that we often feel in response to the current news cycle is a crucial early-warning system that things are indeed not right. Rather than trying to ignore and appease those feelings of anxiety by disengaging, we should be listening to what they are telling us. We need to be more vigilant, not less.

Fuente: Why a digital detox is bad for us | Ruth Whippman | Life and style | The Guardian


The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian

The social media tycoon’s 5,700-word post about the ‘global community’ stokes rumours that another billionaire businessman is planning to run for president

Fuente: The Facebook manifesto: Mark Zuckerberg’s letter to the world looks a lot like politics | Technology | The Guardian


With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian

The rise of the internet may have created our current predicament, but the people who populate the internet can help us get out of it. Next time you go back and forth with someone over a controversial issue online, stick to facts with good sources, and engage in open dialogue. Most importantly, be nice. You may end up being a small part of the process whereby information chaos becomes knowledge.

Fuente: With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs

The phrase “Fake News” has exploded in usage since the election, but the term is similar to other malleable political labels such as “terrorism” and “hate speech”; because the phrase lacks any clear definition, it is essentially useless except as an instrument of propaganda and censorship. The most important fact to realize about this new term: Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Fuente: A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs


Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian

It is crucial for a resilient democracy that we better understand how Google and Facebook are changing the way we think, interact and behave

Fuente: Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian


WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen

WikiLeaks, definida por su fundador, Julian Assange como “una gran biblioteca de la rebelión”, lleva diez años publicando más información secreta que todos los demás medios de prensa combinados. Las revelaciones informaron al público sobre tratados secretos, vigilancia masiva, ataques contra civiles, torturas y asesinatos cometido por los gobiernos de EE.UU. y otros países.

Fuente: WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen


A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The study found that over the last three months of the election campaign, 20 top-performing false election stories from hoax sites and hyper-partisan blogs generated 8,711,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook, whereas the 20 best-performing election stories from 19 major news websites generated a total of 7,367,000 shares, reactions and comments. In other words, if you run a social networking site, fake news is good for business, even if it’s bad for democracy.

Fuente: A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever

One of the very few remaining avenues for learning what the U.S. government is doing — beyond the propaganda that it wants Americans to ingest and thus deliberately disseminates through media outlets — is leaking and whistleblowing. Among the leading U.S. heroes in the war on terror have been the men and women inside various agencies of the U.S. government who discovered serious wrongdoing being carried out in secret, and then risked their own personal welfare to ensure that the public learned of what never should have been hidden in the first place.

Fuente: In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever


How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian

False claims abound on the internet and are snaring many children into believing them

Fuente: How do I tell my daughter that her online ‘truth’ is a conspiracy theory? | Life and style | The Guardian


If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

Journalists should always publish newsworthy information – even if its from a potentially biased source. This election should be no different

Fuente: If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


Gremio histórico de los periódicos de EE.UU. se deshace del “papel” y se abre a los medios digitales – El Mostrador

Dejó de llamarse “Newspaper Association of America” y pasó a ser la News Media Alliance, porque según su presidente ejecutivo, David Chavern,“newspaper” ya no es la palabra adecuada para referirse a muchos miembros del grupo, como The Washington Post, The New York Times y Dow Jones, que si bien son impresos, tienen gran parte de su lectoría a través de la web.

Fuente: Gremio histórico de los periódicos de EE.UU. se deshace del “papel” y se abre a los medios digitales – El Mostrador


A day with Facebook’s trending topics: celebrity birthdays and Pokémon Go | Technology | The Guardian

From a hurricane to Brock Turner’s release, a lot happened last week. But Facebook calculated that a celebrity losing some weight was more important

Fuente: A day with Facebook’s trending topics: celebrity birthdays and Pokémon Go | Technology | The Guardian


‘Anteproyecto vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión’

Como una propuesta que “vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión y genera condiciones que hacen prácticamente imposible el ejercicio del periodismo”, calificó Catalina Botero, ex relatora especial para la Libertad de Expresión de la Comisión Interamericana de los Derechos Humanos, un anteproyecto que obligará a los portales de internet a borrar los datos de cualquier ciudadano de forma “inmediata y completa”, si la persona considera que esa información afecta su intimidad.

Fuente: ‘Anteproyecto vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión’


El nuevo News Feed personalizado de Facebook no es un avance – El Mostrador

La semana pasada, Facebook anunció un cambio en su servicio de News Feed, destinado a poner a los seres humanos en contacto con personas parecidas a ellos y con formas de pensar y actuar que les son familiares.

Fuente: El nuevo News Feed personalizado de Facebook no es un avance – El Mostrador


Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital

Una de las actividades más importantes que realizan las personas en el entorno digital es la manifestación de sus opiniones y la búsqueda y difusión de información sobre diferentes temáticas. De esta manera, Internet se ha vuelto uno de los ámbitos más importantes para que las personas ejerzan el derecho a la libertad de expresión.

Fuente: Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital


La nueva cultura informativa: la realidad de los medios digitales – El Mostrador

La nueva cultura informativa: la realidad de los medios digitales – El Mostrador.

La posibilidad de ejercer el periodismo profesional sin ser un medio impreso es hoy más grande que nunca. El aumento de los medios digitales y blogs, así como la reproducción de los grandes diarios en versiones “electrónicas”, es un síntoma de la mutación del periodismo en la era de la información. El contexto actual ofrece un lugar, y esto es lo interesante, a un periodismo alternativo, a ratos contrahegemónico, que ha venido a disputar los estándares sobre qué es información pública, relevante y veraz.

medios digitales

El proyecto de ley presentado por el diputado Farías (PPD) ha gatillado una discusión pública que venía siendo postergada sistemáticamente por las autoridades de turno. Sucede que la realidad informativa nacional está mutando de ser un duopolio imperfecto, a un escenario de influencias multipolares donde los llamados “medios digitales” irrumpen con fuerza. El proyecto de Farías pretende una reforma de la Ley 19.733 por la vía de introducir modificaciones en el artículo 11. Este proyecto parece ser un simple parche normativo ante la emergencia de una nueva cultura informativa que tiene en su base el pluralismo en los medios.

La posibilidad de ejercer el periodismo profesional sin ser un medio impreso es hoy más grande que nunca. El aumento de los medios digitales y blogs, así como la reproducción de los grandes diarios en versiones “electrónicas”, es un síntoma de la mutación del periodismo en la era de la información. El contexto actual ofrece un lugar, y esto es lo interesante, a un periodismo alternativo, a ratos contrahegemónico, que ha venido a disputar los estándares sobre qué es información pública, relevante y veraz. Ese fenómeno merece ser entendido, desde el punto de vista legislativo, como la posibilidad de expandir el derecho a la comunicación. El pluralismo en los medios debe ser la luz que conduzca ese camino. Hasta aquí, el debate sobre medios digitales ha carecido de criterios evaluativos que estimulen una nueva mirada legislativa, debido a la falta de evidencia sobre la realidad digital de los medios de comunicación en nuestro país.

La Ley 19.733 está encasillada en una cultura informativa pre-Internet que continúa siendo aplicada sin ninguna referencia real con los medios digitales. La mera analogía entre un diario impreso y un medio escrito digital implica asumir que los cánones informativos del siglo XIX siguen inalterados pese a la revolución tecnológica que experimentamos. En ese sentido, el proyecto de Farías puede ser el impulso inicial para detonar en la opinión pública la necesidad de pensar un marco normativo para los medios digitales en Chile. Ese debate debe ser llevado a cabo con datos que permitan comprender las realidades ya configuradas y con las cuales la ley debe saber dialogar.


Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept

Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept.

By 246
Featured photo - Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read?DEAUVILLE, FRANCE – MAY 26: (L-R) Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Union, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook Inc. and Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc. arrive for the internet session of the G8 summit on May 26, 2011 in Deauville, France. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe – Pool/Getty Images)

There have been increasingly vocal calls for Twitter, Facebook and other Silicon Valley corporations to more aggressively police what their users are permitted to see and read. Last month in The Washington Post, for instance, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow demanded that social media companies ban the accounts of “terrorists” who issue “direct calls” for violence.

This week, the announcement by Twitter CEO Dick Costolo that the company would prohibit the posting of the James Foley beheading video and photos from it (and suspend the accounts of anyone who links to the video) met with overwhelming approval. What made that so significant, as The Guardian‘s James Ball noted today, was that “Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception.” By contrast, Facebook has long actively regulated what its users are permitted to say and read; at the end of 2013, the company reversed its prior ruling and decided that posting of beheading videos would be allowed, but only if the user did not express support for the act.

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

It’s tempting to support criminalization of, say, racist views as long as one focuses on one’s contempt for those views and ignores the serious dangers of vesting the state with the general power to create lists of prohibited ideas. That’s why free speech defenders such as the ACLU so often represent and defend racists and others with heinous views in free speech cases: because that’s where free speech erosions become legitimized in the first instance when endorsed or acquiesced to.

The question posed by Twitter’s announcement is not whether you think it’s a good idea for people to see the Foley video. Instead, the relevant question is whether you want Twitter, Facebook and Google executives exercising vast power over what can be seen and read.

It’s certainly true, as defenders of Twitter have already pointed out, that as a legal matter, private actors – as opposed to governments – always possess and frequently exercise the right to decide which opinions can be aired using their property. Generally speaking, the public/private dichotomy is central to any discussions of the legality or constitutionality of “censorship.”


Google comienza a aplicar el derecho al olvido y varios medios se quejan

Google comienza a aplicar el derecho al olvido y varios medios se quejan.

Varios medios de comunicación se han quejado por la retirada de los resultados de Google de algunos de sus artículos, que ellos consideran de interés público

El buscador ha empezado a aplicar la sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea, que garantiza el derecho al olvido a los ciudadanos europeos, aunque la AEPD considera que podría estar extralimitándose

 

 

Medios británicos critican la "torpeza" de Google al aplicar el derecho al olvido

 

 

La puesta en marcha del ‘ derecho al olvido’ por parte de Google, según lo dictado por el Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea (TJUE), ha sembrado la polémica entre los medios de comunicación. Los primeros en dar la voz de alarma han sido los afectados, como la BBC o The Guardian, a quienes el buscador ha notificado la retirada de algunos de sus artículos a causa de las solicitudes recibidas.

Una noticia en The Guardian sobre un árbitro de fútbol que mintió sobre un penalti fue retirada, aunque ante las quejas del periódico británico la compañía ha dado marcha atrás. La BBC recibió una comunicación sobre un artículo en el que se contaba la historia del ex CEO de Merrill Lynch, Stan O’Neal, cuyas prácticas de riesgo llevaron a la institución financiera a una situación desastrosa y quien después cobró una prima por despido de 161,5 millones de dólares. En este caso no se sabe quién ha pedido la eliminación de los resultados porque el enlace sigue apareciendo si se busca ‘Stan O’Neal’.

Los artículos no desaparecen de los resultados de Google (ni mucho menos de Internet, aunque a veces el buscador se identifique con la Red), solamente permanecen ilocalizables si se busca el nombre del implicado en cuestión, quien ha realizado la solicitud de retirada, desde dentro de la Unión Europea. También aparecen buscándolos desde google.com.

Si se buscan los hechos que se narran en el artículo los resultados del buscador lo muestran. El formulario online que tienen que rellenar quienes quieren hacer uso de su derecho al olvido exige que la petición la haga la persona en cuestión o su representante legal, aportando la identificación correspondiente.

El autor del artículo sobre Stan O’Neal, Robert Peston, ha aclarado en un post que el artículo cuenta con un buen número de comentarios y es posible que uno de sus autores haya sido el que ha enviado la petición a Google. A raíz de esto lanza una cuestión al aire y se pregunta sobre toda la gente que ha dejado comentarios en sitios web y blogs.

El periódico El Mundo, en España, también ha recibido una notificación por parte de Google, sobre la retirada de una noticia relacionada con un proceso judicial contra varios directivos de la entidad Riviera Coast Invest. Pese a que gran parte de la polémica se ha generado en torno al artículo sobre Stan O’Neal en la BBC, donde el protagonista del mismo no ha tenido nada que ver, la preocupación ante la retirada de enlaces de interés público por parte del buscador persiste.


BBC News – Why has Google cast me into oblivion?

BBC News – Why has Google cast me into oblivion?.


google sign

This morning the BBC received the following notification from Google:

Notice of removal from Google Search: we regret to inform you that we are no longer able to show the following pages from your website in response to certain searches on European versions of Google:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/legacy/thereporters/robertpeston/2007/10/merrills_mess.html

What it means is that a blog I wrote in 2007 will no longer be findable when searching on Google in Europe.

Which means that to all intents and purposes the article has been removed from the public record, given that Google is the route to information and stories for most people.

So why has Google killed this example of my journalism?

Robert Peston: Removed article “was in public interest”

Well it has responded to someone exercising his or her new “right to be forgotten”, following a ruling in May by the European Court of Justice that Google must delete “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” data from its results when a member of the public requests it.

Track record

The ruling stemmed from a case brought by Mario Costeja González after he failed to secure the deletion of a 1998 auction notice of his repossessed home that was reported in a Spanish newspaper.

Now in my blog, only one individual is named. He is Stan O’Neal, the former boss of the investment bank Merrill Lynch.

My column describes how O’Neal was forced out of Merrill after the investment bank suffered colossal losses on reckless investments it had made.

Is the data in it “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant”?


El Gobierno quiere que Google pague por usar contenidos con derechos de autor | Cultura | EL PAÍS

El Gobierno quiere que Google pague por usar contenidos con derechos de autor | Cultura | EL PAÍS.


Un usuario accede fraudulentamente a contenidos sujetos a derechos de autor.

Enviar a LinkedIn33
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

La vicepresidenta del Gobierno, Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría, y el ministro de Cultura, José Ignacio Wert, han comparecido tras el Consejo de Ministros que ha dado el visto bueno al borrador del anteproyecto de reforma de la Ley de Propiedad Intelectual, que ahora debe continuar su tramitación parlamentaria con los ánimos del sector encendidos.

Una de las principales novedades es que el Gobierno propone una suerte de tasa Google, como la existente en Alemania. El texto establece el derecho de los agregadores de noticias (como GoogleNews) a que se usen fragmentos no significativos de “información, opinión o entretenimiento” sin autorización previa. Para ello, sin embargo, sí se tendrá que pagar una “compensación equitativa”, según ha explicado Wert. Lo que no ha precisado es cómo y quién decidirá qué son “fragmentos no significativos” ni de qué modo se calculará el monto de esa compensación. Esta medida “excluye las fotografías, cuyo uso siempre requiere de autorización, y la actividad de búsqueda por palabras que lleve a la página original, que no requerirá de autorización ni compensación”. Desde Google no se hace ninguna valoración, a la espera de ver el texto definitivo.