Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms

“To give them the space to crush us with misappropriated secrets is a perversion of what our great Constitution stands for. It ends now.” At no point did Pompeo specify what steps the CIA intended to take to ensure that the “space” to publish secrets “ends now.”

Fuente: Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms


Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian

Deregulation could allow the president to undermine freedom of speech in a way that was beyond even Nixon

Fuente: Forget Trump’s tweets and media bans. The real issue is his threat to the internet | Charles Ferguson | Opinion | The Guardian


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


‘Anteproyecto vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión’

Como una propuesta que “vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión y genera condiciones que hacen prácticamente imposible el ejercicio del periodismo”, calificó Catalina Botero, ex relatora especial para la Libertad de Expresión de la Comisión Interamericana de los Derechos Humanos, un anteproyecto que obligará a los portales de internet a borrar los datos de cualquier ciudadano de forma “inmediata y completa”, si la persona considera que esa información afecta su intimidad.

Fuente: ‘Anteproyecto vulnera abiertamente el derecho a la libertad de expresión’


Comunicadores populares repudian censura impuesta por Macri – Resumen

Periodistas e intelectuales de Argentina y de la región crearon el Frente de Comunicadores por la Expresión de los Pueblos, con el objetivo de hacer frente a las amenazas contra la libertad de expresión.

Fuente: Comunicadores populares repudian censura impuesta por Macri – Resumen


Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital

Una de las actividades más importantes que realizan las personas en el entorno digital es la manifestación de sus opiniones y la búsqueda y difusión de información sobre diferentes temáticas. De esta manera, Internet se ha vuelto uno de los ámbitos más importantes para que las personas ejerzan el derecho a la libertad de expresión.

Fuente: Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital


Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS

We’ve been told for years that The Terrorists “hate our freedoms,” yet we cannot seem to rid ourselves of those who think the solution is to voluntarily abolish those freedoms ourselves.

Fuente: Those Demanding Free Speech Limits to Fight ISIS Pose a Greater Threat to U.S. Than ISIS


13 ejemplos de que la censura a la libertad de expresión consigue justo lo contrario | Verne EL PAÍS

13 ejemplos de que la censura a la libertad de expresión consigue justo lo contrario | Verne EL PAÍS.


El atentado contra Charlie Hebdo tampoco servirá para nada

Portada de Charlie Hebdo del 2 de enero de 2011. El nuevo redactor jefe de "Sharia Hebdo" amenaza con "cien latigazos si no te mueres de risa"
Portada de Charlie Hebdo del 2 de enero de 2011. El nuevo redactor jefe de “Sharia Hebdo” amenaza con “cien latigazos si no te mueres de risa”

 

Tres hombres han entrado durante la mañana del miércoles en el semanario satírico francés Charlie Hebdo armados con Kalashnikov y han asesinado a 12 personas, dejando malheridas a otras cuatro. El semanario había sido objeto de amenazas y ataques, después publicar en 2006 caricaturas de Mahoma. De hecho, fue atacado con cócteles molotov en 2011, tras una portada en la que el profeta aparecía como redactor jefe de un número bautizado como Sharia Hebdo.

Si estos asesinatos pretendían que las caricaturas dejaran de circular, han fracasado: a los pocos minutos estos dibujos inundaban Twitter y aparecíangalerías en muchos medios de comunicación. En redes, muchos recogían ademásuna propuesta: que las portadas de los diarios del día siguiente al atentado llevaran las caricaturas de Charlie Hebdo.

Salvando las distancias, es un ejemplo (trágico) del efecto Streisand: cuando alguien intenta censurar algo en internet, se divulga aún más. Este efecto debe su nombre a la denuncia de la actriz y cantante para exigir que se retirara de una web una foto aérea de su casa. La denuncia sólo consiguió que la imagen se difundiera hasta el punto de que aparece hasta en la Wikipedia. El efecto contraproducente de la censura se potencia con internet, pero no es exclusivo de la red, como podemos ver en estos trece ejemplos que muestran que más tarde o más temprano, la libertad de expresión tiene todas las de ganar.


Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept

Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept.

By 246
Featured photo - Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read?DEAUVILLE, FRANCE – MAY 26: (L-R) Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Union, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook Inc. and Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc. arrive for the internet session of the G8 summit on May 26, 2011 in Deauville, France. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe – Pool/Getty Images)

There have been increasingly vocal calls for Twitter, Facebook and other Silicon Valley corporations to more aggressively police what their users are permitted to see and read. Last month in The Washington Post, for instance, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow demanded that social media companies ban the accounts of “terrorists” who issue “direct calls” for violence.

This week, the announcement by Twitter CEO Dick Costolo that the company would prohibit the posting of the James Foley beheading video and photos from it (and suspend the accounts of anyone who links to the video) met with overwhelming approval. What made that so significant, as The Guardian‘s James Ball noted today, was that “Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception.” By contrast, Facebook has long actively regulated what its users are permitted to say and read; at the end of 2013, the company reversed its prior ruling and decided that posting of beheading videos would be allowed, but only if the user did not express support for the act.

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

It’s tempting to support criminalization of, say, racist views as long as one focuses on one’s contempt for those views and ignores the serious dangers of vesting the state with the general power to create lists of prohibited ideas. That’s why free speech defenders such as the ACLU so often represent and defend racists and others with heinous views in free speech cases: because that’s where free speech erosions become legitimized in the first instance when endorsed or acquiesced to.

The question posed by Twitter’s announcement is not whether you think it’s a good idea for people to see the Foley video. Instead, the relevant question is whether you want Twitter, Facebook and Google executives exercising vast power over what can be seen and read.

It’s certainly true, as defenders of Twitter have already pointed out, that as a legal matter, private actors – as opposed to governments – always possess and frequently exercise the right to decide which opinions can be aired using their property. Generally speaking, the public/private dichotomy is central to any discussions of the legality or constitutionality of “censorship.”


Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com

Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com.

By acting on footage of James Foley’s murder, Twitter has taken responsibility in a way it hasn’t over abuse and threats. So what happens next?
Man's hands at computer

Twitter was once characterised by its general counsel as ‘the free speech wing of the free speech party’. Photograph: Alamy

Twitter has got itself into a tangle. The social network’s decision to remove all links to the horrific footage showing the apparent beheading of the photojournalist James Foley is one that most of its users, reasonably, support.

The social network went still further, suspending or banning users who shared the footage or certain stills, following public tweets from the company’s CEO, Dick Costolo, that it would take action against such users.

It is hard to think of anyone having a good reason to view or share such barbaric footage, but Twitter’s proactive approach reverses a long record of non-intervention.

Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception. The company’s former general counsel once characterised the company as “the free speech wing of the free speech party”, an approach characterised by removing content only in extreme situations – when made to by governments in accordance with local law, or through various channels designed to report harassment.

The social network’s response to the Foley footage and images is clearly a break from that response: not only did the network respond to reports complaining about posts using the material, they also seem to have proactively sought it out in other instances.

And yet there is not a universal consensus on the use of the images, as was reflected by the New York Post and New York Daily News’ decision to use graphic stills from the footage as their front-page splashes. Here begin the problems for Twitter: the network decided not to ban or suspend either outlet for sharing the images – despite banning other users for doing the same.

Twitter has not been nearly as eager to enter the content policing game in other situations. Like many other major companies, Twitter has long insisted it is not a publisher but a platform.

The distinction is an important one: publishers, such as the Guardian, bear a far greater degree of responsibility for what appears on their sites. By remaining a platform, Twitter is absolved of legal responsibility for most of the content of tweets. But by making what is in essence an editorial decision not to host a certain type of content, Twitter is rapidly blurring that line.

The network has not been as quick to involve itself when its users are sharing content far beyond what is even remotely acceptable – even when the profile of the incidents is high.


Medios latinoamericanos: ¿libertad de expresión o dictadura del clic? | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Medios latinoamericanos: ¿libertad de expresión o dictadura del clic? | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


KACPER PEMPEL (REUTERS)

Enviar a LinkedIn5
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

Es muy probable que este artículo le haya llegado por una recomendación de Facebook y/o Twitter, con lo cual usted pertenece a una creciente legión de usuarios globales —250 millones de ellos latinoamericanos— que usan la web y las redes sociales para informarse.

América Latina vive una verdadera transformación digital que está cambiando radicalmente la manera en que los usuarios reciben información y que obliga a los gobiernos a adecuar la regulación de la prensa a los nuevos tiempos.

Y en toda esta discusión, la pregunta que prima es: ¿hay más o menos libertad de expresión en la región como resultado de su revolución digital y las nuevas legislaciones mediáticas?

Ese ha sido el quid del debate de un grupo de expertos reunidos este jueves y viernes en Washington, a instancias del Banco Mundial, el Inter American Dialogue, la radio pública de Estados Unidos NPR, y el Centro Carter. El foro Libertad de prensa y la transformación digital en Latinoamérica, trascendió los confines de los auditorios para expandirse a las redes sociales con la etiqueta #mediosdigitales.

“La libertad de expresión, es una de las libertades que la sociedad necesita para ser libre de forma integral”, dijo, a través de, Facebook, Tony Mora desde la República Dominicana, haciendo eco a miles de usuarios de las redes sociales.

EnTwitter, Eliana Barrios se preguntó si realmente se debe regular la libertad de expresión, “¿o eso equivale a la censura?”.


La Web 2.0: o cómo el sitial de la libertad dejó de ser tan libre

Hace algunas décadas atrás, bien es sabido que las páginas web tenían estándares de calidad mucho más bajos que los que reinan hoy en día. Es así, cómo de tener páginas que eran simples htmls exportados desde un archivo de texto hecho en word; se pasó a los blogs de opinión actual, los cuales hicieron al Internet un medio de comunicación al servicio del pueblo y de los marginados del sistema clásico del quinto poder.

Pero es de esperar que en unos años más, esto no sea más que un mero recuerdo. Los sitios con mayores facilidades para los novatos de la informática a veces poseen restricciones demasiado asfixiantes. Por dar un ejemplo, basta con buscar algo respecto al suicidio en tumblr para ser acosado con teléfonos de ayuda y mensajes anti-suicidio. Asimismo, es de conocimiento generalizado que en Estados Unidos tienen un grupo de personas que se dedican a espiar lo que hacen sus ciudadanos, supuestamente para evitar crímenes antes que estos sean cometidos. Pero ¿eso les corresponde?


Pierre Omidyar commits $250m to new media venture with Glenn Greenwald | Media | The Guardian

Pierre Omidyar commits $250m to new media venture with Glenn Greenwald | Media | The Guardian.

Omidyar says decision to set up news organisation fuelled by ‘concern about press freedoms in the US and around the world’

 

 

Pierre Omidyar, eBay founder.
Pierre Omidyar said he hoped the project would promote ‘independent journalists with expertise, and a voice and a following’. Photograph: Bloomberg/Getty Images

 

Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, has revealed more details of the media organization he is creating with journalist Glenn Greenwald.

 

Greenwald announced on Tuesday that he was leaving the Guardian, where he has broken a series of stories on the National Security Agency, based on documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden.

 

In an interview with Jay Rosen, media critic and NYU professor of journalism, Omidyar said he was committing an initial $250m to the as-yet-unnamed venture. Omidyar told Rosen the decision was fuelled by his “rising concern about press freedoms in the United States and around the world”.

 

Omidyar said he hopes the project will promote “independent journalists with expertise, and a voice and a following” while using Silicon Valley knowhow to build an audience. “Companies in Silicon Valley invest a lot in understanding their users and what drives user engagement,” Omidyar said. The company will be online only and all proceeds will be reinvested in journalism.


Fundador de eBay financiará proyecto del periodista de caso Snowden – BioBioChile

Fundador de eBay financiará proyecto del periodista de caso Snowden – BioBioChile.

 

Pierre Omidyar | OnInnovation (CC) – FlickrPierre Omidyar | OnInnovation (CC) – Flickr
Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

El fundador de eBay, Pierre Omidyar anunció este miércoles que financiará el nuevo medio del periodista Glenn Greenwald, quien contribuyó a publicar las revelaciones sobre el vasto sistema de espionaje estadounidense, con el objetivo de “buscar la verdad”.

Nacido en Francia, el multimillonario irano-estadounidense quiere “preservar y reforzar el papel que juega el periodismo en la sociedad”, explicó en un comunicado, confirmando su asociación con el periodista que reveló el programa de inteligencia filtrado por el ex consultor estadounidense Edward Snowden.

Instalado en Rio, Greenwald había anunciado el martes que renunciaba a su puesto en el medio británico The Guardian para crear uno nuevo “de gran alcance”, que cubrirá tanto deportes como cultura, dando particular atención a la política.

El proyecto deberá “apoyar (a los periodistas) y permitirles buscar la verdad”, precisó el fundador de eBay, que figura entre las 50 mayores fortunas estadounidenses.

En su comunicado, Omidyar afirma igualmente compartir “muchas ideas” con Greenwald, partidario de la transparencia y gran defensor de las libertades civiles. “Decidimos unir nuestras fuerzas”, reiteró.