Watch How Casually False Claims are Published: New York Times and Nicholas Lemann Edition

Like most people, I’ve long known that factual falsehoods are routinely published in major media outlets. But as I’ve pointed out before, nothing makes you internalize just how often it really happens, how completely their editorial standards so often fail, like being personally involved in a story that receives substantial media coverage. I cannot count how many times I’ve read or heard claims from major media outlets about the Snowden story that I knew, from first-hand knowledge, were a total fabrication.We have a perfect example of how this happens from the New York Times today, in a book review by Nicholas Lemann, the Pulitzer-Moore professor of journalism at Columbia University as well as a long-time staff writer for The New Yorker.

Fuente: Watch How Casually False Claims are Published: New York Times and Nicholas Lemann Edition


La complicada relación entre Perú y la vigilancia, y cómo solucionarla | Hiperderecho

En Perú, un mecanismo de control débil de la vigilancia hizo caer a un primer ministro. En 2015 la revista peruana, Correo Semanal, alegó que la Dirección de Inteligencia Nacional del Perú (DINI) había espiado ilegalmente a periodistas, empresarios, legisladores, políticos y miembros de las fuerzas armadas y sus familias. La DINI accedió supuestamente a información almacenada en el registro nacional de las propiedades del Perú, y almacenó esta información en expediente de cientos de personas.

Fuente: La complicada relación entre Perú y la vigilancia, y cómo solucionarla | Hiperderecho


Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden

While most eyes are focused on the presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, three major events prove how widespread, and dangerous, mass surveillance has become in the West. Standing alone, each event highlights exactly the severe threats that motivated Edward Snowden to blow his whistle; taken together, they constitute full-scale vindication of everything he’s done.

Fuente: Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian

The ‘radical transparency’ organization has published sensitive personal data belonging to hundreds of ordinary citizens, an investigation has revealed

Fuente: WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian


Edward Snowden’s New Research Aims to Keep Smartphones From Betraying Their Owners

National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden has been working with prominent hardware hacker Andrew “Bunnie” Huang to solve this problem. The pair are developing a way for potentially imperiled smartphone users to monitor whether their devices are making any potentially compromising radio transmissions. They argue that a smartphone’s user interface can’t be relied on to tell you the truth about that state of its radios. Their initial prototyping work uses an iPhone 6.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s New Research Aims to Keep Smartphones From Betraying Their Owners


Edward Snowden on police pursuing journalist data: the scandal is what the law allows | Australia news | The Guardian

NSA whistleblower responds to admission by Australian federal police that it investigated leaks to a Guardian journalist by requesting his metadata

Fuente: Edward Snowden on police pursuing journalist data: the scandal is what the law allows | Australia news | The Guardian


A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald

NSA WHISTLEBLOWER Edward Snowden joined MIT professor Noam Chomsky and The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald on Friday for a discussion on privacy rights hosted by the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The panel was moderated by Nuala O’Connor, the president of the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Fuente: A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald


Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can't Guess – The Intercept

Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can’t Guess – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can’t Guess

It’s getting easier to secure your digital privacy. iPhones now encrypt agreat deal of personal information; hard drives on Mac and Windows 8.1computers are now automatically locked down; even Facebook, which made a fortune on open sharing, is providing end-to-end encryption in the chat tool WhatsApp. But none of this technology offers as much protection as you may think if you don’t know how to come up with a good passphrase.

A passphrase is like a password, but longer and more secure. In essence, it’s an encryption key that you memorize. Once you start caring more deeply about your privacy and improving your computer security habits, one of the first roadblocks you’ll run into is having to create a passphrase. You can’t secure much without one.

For example, when you encrypt your hard drive, a USB stick, or a document on your computer, the disk encryption is often only as strong as your passphrase. If you use a password database, or the password-saving feature in your web browser, you’ll want to set a strong master passphrase to protect them. If you want to encrypt your email with PGP, you protect your private key with a passphrase. In his first email to Laura Poitras, Edward Snowden wrote, “Please confirm that no one has ever had a copy of your private key and that it uses a strong passphrase. Assume your adversary is capable of one trillion guesses per second.”

In this post, I outline a simple way to come up with easy-to-memorize but very secure passphrases. It’s the latest entry in an ongoing series of stories offering solutions — partial and imperfect but useful solutions — to the many surveillance-related problems we aggressively report about here atThe Intercept.

It turns out, coming up with a good passphrase by just thinking of one is incredibly hard, and if your adversary really is capable of one trillion guesses per second, you’ll probably do a bad job of it. If you use an entirely random sequence of characters it might be very secure, but it’s also agonizing to memorize (and honestly, a waste of brain power).

But luckily this usability/security trade-off doesn’t have to exist. There is a method for generating passphrases that are both impossible for even the most powerful attackers to guess, yet very possible for humans to memorize. The method is called Diceware, and it’s based on some simple math.


Un pequeño libro rojo para estar más seguros en la Red

Un pequeño libro rojo para estar más seguros en la Red.


Con prólogo de Edward Snowden, Marta Peirano publica un manual con técnicas para que periodistas y activistas protejan sus comunicaciones digitales

Marta Peirano, sonriendo con su libro en la librería donde se hizo la presentación

Marta Peirano, sonriendo con su libro en la librería donde se hizo la presentación

Tener un prólogo escrito por el hombre más buscado del planeta puede parecer la mejor razón para leer este libro, pero en realidad, no lo es. Hay mucho más en el Pequeño Libro Rojo del Activista en Red que ha escrito Marta Peirano, jefa de Cultura de eldiario.es: es una maravillosa introducción a las medidas de seguridad que todos deberíamos estar usando ya a dos años de las revelaciones de Edward Snowden, el exanalista de la NSA que reveló el mayor espionaje conocido hasta la fecha.
Cuando Snowden reveló lo que sabía desde aquella habitación en el hotel Mira de Hong Kong, Internet dejó de ser el espacio de libertad en el que creíamos haber vivido durante sus primeros años. A partir de ese momento tuvimos que darnos cuenta forzosamente de que ya no somos ciudadanos protegidos por un estado y consumidores cuya intimidad es respetada por empresas. Tuvimos que protegernos y empezar a conocer las medidas de seguridad para evitar que nuestros datos terminen en quién sabe qué servidores y con qué fines. Sí, lo sospechábamos, pero Snowden nos confirmó que era cierto.

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción.

El documental de Laura Poitras cuenta los primeros momentos de la mayor filtración de espionaje de un Gobierno en la historia

La existencia de un segundo filtrador dentro de la NSA y el reencuentro de Snowden con su pareja en Moscú son las dos revelaciones del documental

La fecha de estreno en España está prevista para el 27 de marzo

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

La película de Laura Poitras es un documental imprescindible para entender esta nueva etapa de internet. Citizenfour es, primero, un documento histórico que recoge de primerísima mano el encuentro de Edward Snowden con los periodistas que le ayudaron a revelar al mundo el mayor espionaje masivo conocido; y después, una película inquietante, donde es la información y no la música la que nos hace darnos cuenta de que no estamos viendo ciencia ficción.

Como dice Snowden a un absorto Glenn Greenwald tras contarle cómo funciona XKeyscore, un programa de la NSA: “Esto ya está sucediendo”.


How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian

How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian.

Two thirds of investigative journalists think they're being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that.

 Two thirds of investigative journalists think they’re being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that. Photograph: PAWEL KOPCZYNSKI/REUTERS

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass surveillance by government agencies has made a big impact on investigative journalists, according to a new study.

The survey of 671 journalists, conducted by the US-based Pew Research Center and Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, found that 64% believe that the US government has probably collected data about their communications.

49% said that they have changed the way they store and share potentially sensitive documents in the last year as a result, while 29% have altered the way they communicate with fellow journalists.

However, only 3% have opted not to pursue a particular story due to concerns about electronic surveillance and hacking, although 13% have not reached out to a particular source for those reasons. Just 2% have considered abandoning investigative journalism.


WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian

WikiLeaks threatens legal action against Google and US after email revelations | Technology | The Guardian.

 in New York

WikiLeaks Sarah Harrison
 WikiLeaks journalist Sarah Harrison addresses the media at the Geneva Press Club on Tuesday. Photograph: Pierre Albouy/Reuters

WikiLeaks is fighting back in an escalating war with both Google and the US government, threatening legal action the day after demanding answers for the tech giant’s wholesale handover of its staffers’ Gmail contents to US law enforcement.

The targets of the investigation were not notified until two and a half years after secret search warrants were issued and served by the FBI, legal representatives for WikiLeaks said in a press conference on Monday.

“We’re looking at legal action not only with Google but to those who actually turned in the order,” said Baltasar Garzón, the head of Julian Assange’s legal defence team. Calling the order illegal and arbitrary, Garzón said insisted “any information that would be used from the taking of documents [this way] will be considered as biased, illegal and will cancel the whole proceedings.”

“I’m not sure what craziness – what desperation – went into the US to make them behave this way, but this is … a clear violation of rights,” Garzón said.

“Our policy is to tell people about government requests for their data, except in limited cases, like when we are gagged by a court order, which sadly happens quite frequently,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement to the Guardian. “We’ve challenged many orders related to WikiLeaks which has led to disclosures to people who are affected. We’ve also pushed to unseal all the documents related to the investigation.”

Michael Ratner, a member of the Assange legal team in the US and president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights, said that WikiLeaks had sent a letter to Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, asking why the company waited so long before notifying the targets of the warrants.

On Monday, Ratner went further, saying that WikiLeaks would decide on what legal action to take depending on Google’s response to the letter, which he said was expected within a week.

The notification of the court order was sent by email from Google to WikiLeaks on 23 December 2014 – just before Christmas, a typically quiet time for the news cycle – and was published on WikiLeaks’ site. Google said the legal process was initially subject to a nondisclosure or “gag” order that prohibited Google from disclosing the existence of the legal process.

Ratner told the Guardian that there were several questions as to what that legal process entailed. “Did Google go to court at all?” Ratner said. “Would they have notified us that that ‘we went to court and we lost?’ I don’t know.”

“If they didn’t go to court, that would not be a great move by Google, because you would expect them to litigate on behalf of their subscribers,” he said.

“Perhaps after the Snowden revelation, Google got nervous and decided to go to court,” Ratner added. “My big thing is: did they go to court initially? If they didn’t, I would consider that a real failure.”

The Google court order targeted three WikiLeaks employees: journalist Sarah Harrison, spokesperson and journalist Kristinn Hrafnsson and editor Joseph Farrell.

The wide-ranging scope of the order meant that all email content, including deleted emails, drafts, place and time of login, plus contact lists and all emails sent and received by the three targets – for the entire history of their email account up to the date of the order – had to be handed over to the FBI.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días

Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU | Tecnología | Cinco Días.


Wikileaks estudia demandar a Google por entregar información a EE UU

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El equipo jurídico del portal Wikileaks, liderado por el exjuez de la Audiencia Nacional española Baltasar Garzón, está estudiando emprender acciones legales contra Google por haber entregado a las autoridades estadounidenses información digital de periodistas de la web.

Así lo anunció hoy el propio jurista en una rueda de prensa en Ginebra, donde expuso la situación personal y jurídica en la que se encuentra el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, y todas las personas que trabajan en el portal responsable de la filtración de miles de documentos secretos de EEUU.

Garzón explicó que el pasado 23 de diciembre supieron que Google había transmitido a las autoridades estadounidenses toda la información digital con la que contaban de tres periodistas, los británicos Sarah Harrison y Joseph Farrell, y el islandés Kristinn Hrafnsson.

“La obtención de esa información es totalmente arbitraria e ilícita, la obtención ilegal de estos documentos puede impugnar todo el procedimiento”, afirmó Garzón, quien recordó que lo mínimo que Google habría debido hacer era informar a los periodistas de que las autoridades estadounidenses requerían dicha información.


‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian

‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian.

Campaigners fear draft code of Ripa legislation will allow police sweeping powers to access phone and email records of journalists, lawyers and doctors
Armed police officers Houses of Parliament
Armed police officers inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament in London. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

An urgent campaign has been launched for a “freedom of expression” law to protect confidential journalists’, MPs’ and lawyers’ phone and communications records being secretly snooped on by the police.

Senior editors and lawyers condemned as “wholly inadequate” safeguards put forward by Theresa May in December to meet concerns over the police use of surveillance powers in a code of practice linked to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (Ripa).

The critics of the draft code fear that the police will still have sweeping powers allowing them to authorise themselves to access the phone and email records of professionals such as journalists, lawyers, doctors, MPs and priests who handle privileged, confidential information.

More than 3,000 national and regional editors are being asked to sign a joint letter from the Society of Editors and Press Gazette, the industry’s journal, condemning the Home Office joint code for failing to recognise “the overarching importance of protecting journalists’ sources”.

The campaign comes as the prime minister, David Cameron, called for an extension of the laws that give snooping powers to security services with a plan to ban encrypted messages in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo Paris attacks.


Laura Poitras: "Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo"

Laura Poitras: “Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo”.

La documentalista que ayudó a Snowden presenta su documental en Europa, ‘Citizenfour’, donde muestra cómo fue la preparación de la mayor filtración de la historia

“Snowden no está cooperando o trabajando para ninguna otra agencia de inteligencia, eso es simplemente una historia creada por el Gobierno”, asegura la periodista, elegida por el propio extrabajador de la NSA para hacer pública su filtración

“Lo que Glenn y yo publicamos ahora con Snowden cuestiona directamente el liderazgo de Obama”

 

 

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

 

 

A estas alturas de la película, ¿quién no sabe quién es Edward Snowden? Su denuncia sobre los sistemas de espionaje masivo e indiscriminado utilizados por la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) contra gobiernos, corporaciones y hasta sus propios ciudadanos ha pasado ya a la historia como la mayor filtración de un trabajador de los servicios de inteligencia jamás publicada. Y si a alguien hemos de dar gracias por ello –además de al joven informático– es a Laura Poitras, documentalista estadounidense afincada en Berlín, a quien Citizenfour eligió para hacer pública su historia “sin importar lo que le pasara a él”. Ella, arriesgando también su vida, así lo hizo.


Jacob Appelbaum: "La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social"

Jacob Appelbaum: “La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social”.

Appelbaum, una de las caras visibles del proyecto TOR, reclama que la sociedad sea consciente de que debe protegerse de los abusos del Estado con tecnología y nuevas leyes

“Están intentando asustar a la sociedad y decir a la ciudadanía que el uso de estas herramientas es terrorífico, pero lo que no nos cuentan es cómo ellos utilizan los sistemas de vigilancia para matar gente”

“Con las revelaciones de Snowden simplemente hemos pasado de la teoría a la certeza”

 

 

Jacob Appelbaum | Foto: COP:DOX  http://cphdox.dk/sites/default/files/styles/title-top/public/title/24276.jpg?itok=tGB_VZdM

Jacob Appelbaum, investigador, hacker y miembro de Proyecto Tor | Foto: CPH:DOX

 

 

Cryptoparties hay muchas. Cientos de ellas se celebran cada hora en cualquier parte del mundo, en un café, en la parte trasera de una tienda o incluso off the radar si se trata de compartir conocimientos con activistas o periodistas que trabajan en condiciones de riesgo. Las hay que ya han pasado a la historia como la organizada en 2011 via Twitter por la activista austaliana Asher Wolf, considerada la chispa de lo que en apenas semanas pasó a convertirse en un movimiento social a escala global, o la promovida por un –entonces aún desconocido—  Edward Snowden en un hacklab de Hawái cuando aún trabajaba para la NSA, y apenas un mes antes de contactar con Laura Poitras para revelarle el mayor escándalo de espionaje masivo conocido hasta el momento.

Sin embargo, una cryptoparty que reúna en una misma sala, precisamente, a la confidente de Snowden y directora del documental Citizenfour, Poitras; al activista, experto en seguridad informática y desarrollador de TOR, Jacob Appelbaum; y a William Binney –exoficial de inteligencia de la NSA convertido en whistleblower más de una década antes de que Snowden lo hiciera— solo hay una: la celebrada la semana pasada en el Bremen Theater de Copenhague con motivo del estreno del documental de Poitras en el festival internacional de cine documental CPH: DOX.

“Hace diez años nadie hubiera pensado en organizar un evento para hablar de esto, hubieran pensado que estábamos locos” comenta Jacob Appelbaum, uno de los gurús de la criptografía, miembro del equipo desarrollador de TOR y activista implacable en la lucha contra los sistemas de vigilancia masivos empleados por los gobiernos de distintos países. Eso demuestra que algo ha cambiado. Y lo dice la persona que precisamente inició en esto de la criptografía a la mismísima Poitras, cuyos conocimientos (y trayectoria cinematográfica, que incluía un corto documental sobre William Binney) fueron determinantes cuando Snowden eligió a quién revelaría su preciado secreto, aunque como el propio Citizenfour prefiere plantearlo, ella misma se eligió.

“Había empezado a utilizar criptografía cuando comencé a comunicarme con Jake”, contó Poitras. “Estaba muy interesada en su trabajo entrenando a activistas alrededor del mundo en cómo sortear los sistemas de vigilancia. Así que tuve que cargarme las pilas, me bajé algunas herramientas, en concreto usaba dos: PGP Email y chat OTR”, las mismas herramientas que Snowden enseñó a instalar a Glenn Greenwald para poder comunicarse de forma segura.

“Recuerdo que mandé un email a Jake explicándole quién era y el documental en el que estaba trabajando. Enseguida me contestó y me dijo que teníamos verificar las fingerprints, yo no tenía ni idea de lo que estaba hablando, así que me hice la entendida, le pedí unos minutos para ganar tiempo y me puse a buscar online de qué iba eso de las fingerprints“. “La verdad es que fue muy buen profesor y luego me enseñó muchas más cosas, que luego aparentemente fueron bastante oportunas cuando en enero de 2013 recibí el primer email de un tal Citizenfour pidiéndome mi clave pública”.


The NSA and Me – The Intercept

The NSA and Me – The Intercept.

By James Bamford

The tone of the answering machine message was routine, like a reminder for a dental appointment. But there was also an undercurrent of urgency. “Please call me back,” the voice said. “It’s important.”

What worried me was who was calling: a senior attorney with the Justice Department’s secretive Office of Intelligence Policy and Review. By the time I hung up the payphone at a little coffee shop in Cambridge, Mass., and wandered back to my table, strewn with yellow legal pads and dog-eared documents, I had guessed what he was after: my copy of the Justice Department’s top-secret criminal file on the National Security Agency. Only two copies of the original were ever made. Now I had to find a way to get it out of the country—fast.

It was July 8, 1981, a broiling Wednesday in Harvard Square, and I was in a quiet corner of the Algiers Coffee House on Brattle Street. A cool, souk-like basement room, with the piney aroma of frankincense, it made for a perfect hideout to sort through documents, jot down notes, and pore over stacks of newspapers while sipping bottomless cups of Arabic coffee and espresso the color of dark chocolate.

1967-Hawaii-Boat-21

The author in Hawaii, 1967

For several years I had been working on my first book, The Puzzle Palace, which provided the first in-depth look at the National Security Agency. The deeper I dug, the more troubled I became. Not only did the classified file from the Justice Department accuse the NSA of systematically breaking the law by eavesdropping on American citizens, it concluded that it was impossible to prosecute those running the agency because of the enormous secrecy that enveloped it. Worse, the file made clear that the NSA itself was effectively beyond the law—allowed to bypass statutes passed by Congress and follow its own super-classified charter, what the agency called a “top-secret birth certificate” drawn up by the White House decades earlier.

Knowing the potential for such an unregulated agency to go rogue, I went on to write two more books about the NSA, Body of Secrets, in 2001, and The Shadow Factory, in 2008. My goal was to draw attention to the dangers the agency posed if it is not closely watched and controlled—dangers that would be laid bare in stark detail by Edward Snowden years later.


The Guardian wins an Emmy for coverage of NSA revelations | World news | theguardian.com

The Guardian wins an Emmy for coverage of NSA revelations | World news | theguardian.com.

Interactive NSA Decoded explained implications of the Edward Snowden leaks on mass surveillance by intelligence agencies

 

 

Guardian NSA Emmy
The team behind the award-winning interactive. Photograph: Guardian

 

The Guardian US has won an Emmy for its groundbreaking coverage of Edward Snowden’s disclosures about mass surveillance by US intelligence agencies.

 

The Guardian’s multimedia interactive feature NSA Decoded was announced as the winner in the new approaches: current news category at the news and documentary Emmy awards in New York on Tuesday night.

 

The comprehensive interactive walks the audience through the facts and implications of the NSA’s mass surveillance program, revealed by the Guardian last year in coverage based on leaks by Snowden.


Un informe alerta de que el espionaje amenaza la libertad de prensa en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Un informe alerta de que el espionaje amenaza la libertad de prensa en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Human Rights Watch y American Civil Liberties Union critican los programas de la Administración

Logotipo de la NSA, en su sede a las afueras de Washington DC. / AP

Los programas de espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA, por sus siglas en inglés) y la ofensiva del Gobierno de Barack Obama para evitar cualquier filtración interna están socavando la libertad de prensa y el derecho a la asistencia letrada en Estados Unidos. Esta es la contundente conclusión de un informe, difundido este lunes, por las organizaciones Human Rights Watch y American Civil Liberties Union.

“Las fuentes están menos dispuestas a hablar con la prensa y se está ralentizando la cobertura informativa”, lamentó en el acto de presentación Alex Sinha, el autor del documento, basado en 90 entrevistas a periodistas, abogados y cargos gubernamentales en el último año. “Si EE UU fracasa en abordar estas preocupaciones con rapidez y eficacia, podría causar un serio y duradero daño a la democracia en el país”.

La presión oficial está forzando a periodistas y fuentes a rescatar formas de comunicación del pasado u optar por técnicas similares a las que usan los criminales, como hablar mediante cabinas telefónicas, usar teléfonos móviles desechables o mantener encuentros en persona sin ningún teléfono móvil. Todo ello para evitar que las comunicaciones puedan ser analizadas por la Administración y ante el creciente temor que ese rastro digital pueda ser usado en su contra.

El Gobierno de Obama, deploró Sinha, ha acusado en los tribunales a más fuentes informativas que todos los otros gobiernos estadounidenses juntos. Desde que llegó a la Casa Blanca en 2009, el presidente demócrata ha sido más agresivo que sus predecesores en silenciar filtraciones de asuntos de seguridad: su administración ha llevado a ocho personas a los tribunales, no ha tenido reparos en espiar directamente a periodistas –como hizo en 2012 con reporteros de la agencia Associated Press– y, desde que el exanalista Edward Snowden destapó hace un año la recolección masiva de datos por parte de la NSA, ha redoblado sus esfuerzos en detectar “amenazas internas” de empleados gubernamentales que podrían filtrar información confidencial.

Estados Unidos se presenta como un modelo de libertad y democracia, pero sus programas de espionaje están amenazando los valores que dice representar”

Alex Sinha, autor del informe

“Estados Unidos se presenta como un modelo de libertad y democracia, pero sus programas de espionaje están amenazando los valores que dice representar”, subrayó el investigador. “El Gobierno tiene la obligación de defender la seguridad nacional, pero muchos de sus programas de vigilancia van más allá de lo que podría ser justificado como necesario y proporcionado”.

En el terreno judicial, el informe alerta de que el escrutinio masivo ha puesto en duda la capacidad de los letrados de cumplir con su responsabilidad de garantizar la confidencialidad de la información de sus clientes. “Los abogados tienen mayores dificultades en conseguir que sus clientes confíen en ellos o en resguardar su estrategia legal”, apunta.


I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian

I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian.

Fiction and films, the nearest most of us knowingly get to the world of espionage, give us a series of reliable stereotypes. British spies are hard-bitten, libidinous he-men. Russian agents are thickset, low-browed and facially scarred. And defectors end up as tragic old soaks in Moscow, scanning old copies of the Times for news of the Test match.

Such a fate was anticipated for Edward Snowden by Michael Hayden, a former NSA and CIA chief, who predicted last September that the former NSA analyst would be stranded in Moscow for the rest of his days – “isolated, bored, lonely, depressed… and alcoholic”.

But the Edward Snowden who materialises in our hotel room shortly after noon on the appointed day seems none of those things. A year into his exile in Moscow, he feels less, not more, isolated. If he is depressed, he doesn’t show it. And, at the end of seven hours of conversation, he refuses a beer. “I actually don’t drink.” He smiles when repeating Hayden’s jibe. “I was like, wow, their intelligence is worse than I thought.”

Oliver Stone, who is working on a film about the man now standing in room 615 of the Golden Apple hotel on Moscow’s Malaya Dmitrovka, might struggle to make his subject live up to the canon of great movie spies. The American director has visited Snowden in Moscow, and wants to portray him as an out-and-out hero, but he is an unconventional one: quiet, disciplined, unshowy, almost academic in his speech. If Snowden has vices – and God knows they must have been looking for them – none has emerged in the 13 months since he slipped away from his life as a contracted NSA analyst in Hawaii, intent on sharing the biggest cache of top-secret material the world has ever seen.

Since arriving in Moscow, Snowden has been keeping late and solitary hours – effectively living on US time, tapping away on one of his three computers (three to be safe; he uses encrypted chat, too). If anything, he appears more connected and outgoing than he could be in his former life as an agent. Of his life now, he says, “There’s actually not that much difference. You know, I think there are guys who are just hoping to see me sad. And they’re going to continue to be disappointed.”

When the Guardian first spoke to Snowden a year ago in Hong Kong, he had been dishevelled, his hair uncombed, wearing jeans and a T-shirt. The 31-year-old who materialised last week was smartly, if anonymously, dressed in black trousers and grey jacket, his hair tidily cut. He is jockey-light – even skinnier than a year ago. And he looks pale: “Probably three steps from death,” he jokes. “I mean, I don’t eat a whole lot. I keep a weird schedule. I used to be very active, but just in the recent period I’ve had too much work to focus on.”

 Edward Snowden – video interview

There was no advance warning of where we would meet: his only US television interview, with NBC’s Brian Williams in May, was conducted in an anonymous hotel room of Snowden’s choosing. This time, he prefers to come to us. On his arrival, there is a warm handshake for Guardian reporter Ewen MacAskill, whom he last saw in Hong Kong – a Sunday night after a week of intense work in a frowsty hotel room, a few hours before the video revealing his identity to the world went public. Neither man knew if they would ever meet again.

Snowden orders chicken curry from room service and, as he forks it down, is immediately into the finer points of the story that yanked him from a life of undercover anonymity to global fame. The Snowden-as-alcoholic jibe is not the only moment when he reflects wryly on his former colleagues’ patchy ability to get on top of events over the past year. There was, for instance, the incident last July when a plane carrying President Evo Morales back to Bolivia from Moscow was forced down in Vienna and searched for a stowaway Snowden. “I was like, first off, wow, their intelligence sucks, from listening to everything. But, two, are they really going to the point of just completely humiliating the president of a Latin American nation, the representative of so many people? It was just shockingly poorly thought out, and yet they did it anyway, and they keep at these sort of mistakes.” It was as if they were trying not to find him. “I almost felt like I had some sort of friend in government.”


Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com.

Exclusive: Whistleblower says NSA revelations mean those with duty to protect confidentiality must urgently upgrade security• Watch Snowden’s interview with the Guardian in Moscow• Read the full interview with Snowden by Alan Rusbridger and Ewen MacAskill on Friday

The NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden, has urged lawyers, journalists, doctors, accountants, priests and others with a duty to protect confidentiality to upgrade security in the wake of the spy surveillance revelations.

Snowden said professionals were failing in their obligations to their clients, sources, patients and parishioners in what he described as a new and challenging world.

“What last year’s revelations showed us was irrefutable evidence that unencrypted communications on the internet are no longer safe. Any communications should be encrypted by default,” he said.

The response of professional bodies has so far been patchy.

A minister at the Home Office in London, James Brokenshire, said during a Commons debate about a new surveillance bill on Tuesday that a code of practice to protect legal professional privilege and others requiring professional secrecy was under review.

Snowden’s plea for the professions to tighten security came during an extensive and revealing interview with the Guardian in Moscow.

The former National Security Agency and CIA computer specialist, wanted by the US under the Espionage Act after leaking tens of thousands of top secret documents, has given only a handful of interviews since seeking temporary asylum in Russia a year ago.

Edward Snowden during his interview with Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and reporter Ewen MacAskill Edward Snowden during his interview with the Guardian in Moscow. Photograph: Alan Rusbridger for the Guardian

During the seven hours of interview, Snowden:

• Said if he ended up in US detention in Guantánamo Bay he could live with it.

• Offered rare glimpses into his daily life in Russia, insisting that, contrary to reports that he is depressed, he is not sad and does not have any regrets. He rejected various conspiracy theories surrounding him, describing as “bullshit” suggestions he is a Russian spy.

• Said that, contrary to a claim he works for a Russian organisation, he was independently secure, living on savings, and money from awards and speeches he has delivered online round the world.

• Made a startling claim that a culture exists within the NSA in which, during surveillance, nude photographs picked up of people in “sexually compromising” situations are routinely passed around.

• Spoke at length about his future, which seems destined to be spent in Russia for the foreseeable future after expressing disappointment over the failure of western European governments to offer him a home.

• Said he was holding out for a jury trial in the US rather a judge-only one, hopeful that it would be hard to find 12 jurors who would convict him if he was charged with an offence to which there was a public interest defence. Negotiations with the US government on a return to his country appear to be stalled.


No Place to Hide review – Glenn Greenwald's compelling account of NSA/GCHQ surveillance | Books | The Observer

No Place to Hide review – Glenn Greenwald’s compelling account of NSA/GCHQ surveillance | Books | The Observer.

This powerful account of the Edward Snowden case reveals the threat posed by spying

 

 

Greenwald, books

The NSA’s threat operations centre in the Washington suburb of Fort Meade, Maryland. ‘The details of intrusion are shocking.’ Photograph: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty Images

 

Before Glenn Greenwald appeared on Newsnight last October to argue the case for the Snowden revelations on a link from Brazil, the presenter that evening, Kirsty Wark, popped into the green room to have a word with the other guests on the show, one of whom was Pauline Neville-Jones, formerly chair of the Joint Intelligence Committee. The interview, she apparently told them, would show that Greenwald was just “a campaigner and an activist”, a phrase she later used disparagingly on air.

 

And so the BBC went after the man, not the story. However, on this occasion, the man held his own rather well, roasting Wark and Neville-Jones with remorseless trial lawyer logic, making them look ill-prepared and silly in the process. At the time, I remember thinking that Edward Snowden had chosen exactly the right person for the job of chief advocate – a smart, unyielding, fundamentalist liberal outsider.

Some of these characteristics made me wonder if his account of the Snowden affair would be one long harangue, but No Place to Hide is clearly written and compelling. Though I have been writing about the war on liberty for nearly a decade, I found that reacquainting myself with the details of surveillance and intrusion  by America’s NSA and Britain’s GCHQ was simply shocking. As the stories rolled out last year, there was almost too much to absorb – from Prism, the program used by the NSA to access, among others, Google, Microsoft and Apple servers, to the UK’s Tempora, which taps fibre optic cables and draws up web and telephone traffic; from the secret collaboration of the web and phone giants to the subversion of internet encryption and spying on ordinary people’s political activities, their medical history, their friends and intimate relations and all their activities online. I published a dystopian novel in 2009 that featured a similarly intrusive program, which I named DEEPTRUTH, and let me tell you, I didn’t predict half of it.


Glenn Greenwald: 'I don't trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme' | World news | The Guardian

Glenn Greenwald: ‘I don’t trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme’ | World news | The Guardian.

He has been lauded and vilified in equal measure. But did the journalist’s ‘outsider’ status help him land Edward Snowden’s NSA revelations? Why did he nearly miss the story? And how powerless did he feel when his partner was detained at Heathrow? One year after the scoop, we meet him in his jungle paradise in Rio

 

 

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice'… Glenn Greenwald in Rio'

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice’… Glenn Greenwald in Rio’ Photograph: Jimmy Chalk for the Guardian

 

The dogs can smell Glenn Greenwald long before they see him. As we drive up the hill to his house, a cacophony of barking greets us. The chorus is so overwhelming it makes me think of the National Security Agency (NSA) chiefs who Greenwald has tormented over the past year.”They don’t bite,” Greenwald says as we are engulfed by the pack of strays that he and his partner, David Miranda, have rescued. After a beat, he adds: “… as long as you don’t show any fear.” I’m not certain he’s joking, which is awkward, given that there are 12 of them, ranging from an 80lb Burmese mountain dog to a rat-sized miniature pinscher.

The image of Greenwald and his dogs has been beamed around the world by news organisations since his first NSA revelations were published by the Guardian last year. A writer with a devoted following even before the revelations, he now enjoys more widespread exposure, particularly in the US where his brand of aggressive campaigning journalism has attracted both paeans and condemnation.

But the sight of him surrounded by the animals still comes as a shock. It underlines how dramatically the internet has revolutionised journalism and the nature of the newsroom.

Think of that legendary 1973 photograph of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein at the height of Watergate. They are sitting at manual typewriters under neon lights in the Washington Post newsroom. The photo speaks to the power of institutions – that of their newspaper just as much as the White House they were investigating.

Now think of where I’m standing in Glenn Greenwald’s retreat, shrouded in jackfruit, banana and lemon trees, where monkeys call in daily and only yesterday a lethal spider the size of a fist was discovered in the bathroom. This is the newsroom of 2014, almost 5,000 miles from Washington DC, the jungle office of the journalist that the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden handpicked to be his conduit to the outside world.

As the anniversary approaches of Greenwald’s first Guardian scoop on 5 June 2013, revealing that the NSA was collecting the telephone records of millions of Americans, his life appears to have calmed a bit. He’s taking the time to get his fitness back after a stressful period, doing yoga by a stream in the garden and eating calorie-controlled ready meals in an attempt to shed the 12lbs he put on.


Reporting the NSA spying revelations: Q&A with Guardian editors | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Reporting the NSA spying revelations: Q&A with Guardian editors | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger and Guardian US editor Janine Gibson answer questions about the NSA revelations at 10amET/3pmBST

 

 

 

NSA campus in Fort Meade, Maryland.
NSA campus in Fort Meade, Maryland. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

 

Revelations from documents Edward Snowden shared with the Guardian have fuelled debate about government surveillance activities in both the UK and US. Since June, hundreds of stories have been published by a team of reporters around the globe.

 

In order to address reader comments and questions about how the Guardian has reported these stories, Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger and Guardian US editor Janine Gibson will be answering reader questions within this live blog Monday 26 August from 10amET/3pmBST.

 

You can submit your questions ahead of time in the comments under this post or by using the hashtag #mynsaquestion on Twitter. Clarity is our main criteria in selecting quality questions with the time allotted.