Watch How Casually False Claims are Published: New York Times and Nicholas Lemann Edition

Like most people, I’ve long known that factual falsehoods are routinely published in major media outlets. But as I’ve pointed out before, nothing makes you internalize just how often it really happens, how completely their editorial standards so often fail, like being personally involved in a story that receives substantial media coverage. I cannot count how many times I’ve read or heard claims from major media outlets about the Snowden story that I knew, from first-hand knowledge, were a total fabrication.We have a perfect example of how this happens from the New York Times today, in a book review by Nicholas Lemann, the Pulitzer-Moore professor of journalism at Columbia University as well as a long-time staff writer for The New Yorker.

Fuente: Watch How Casually False Claims are Published: New York Times and Nicholas Lemann Edition


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


La complicada relación entre Perú y la vigilancia, y cómo solucionarla | Hiperderecho

En Perú, un mecanismo de control débil de la vigilancia hizo caer a un primer ministro. En 2015 la revista peruana, Correo Semanal, alegó que la Dirección de Inteligencia Nacional del Perú (DINI) había espiado ilegalmente a periodistas, empresarios, legisladores, políticos y miembros de las fuerzas armadas y sus familias. La DINI accedió supuestamente a información almacenada en el registro nacional de las propiedades del Perú, y almacenó esta información en expediente de cientos de personas.

Fuente: La complicada relación entre Perú y la vigilancia, y cómo solucionarla | Hiperderecho


Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden

While most eyes are focused on the presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, three major events prove how widespread, and dangerous, mass surveillance has become in the West. Standing alone, each event highlights exactly the severe threats that motivated Edward Snowden to blow his whistle; taken together, they constitute full-scale vindication of everything he’s done.

Fuente: Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden


Montreal police defend surveillance of journalist’s phone amid outcry | World news | The Guardian

Rights campaigners are among those sounding the alarm over the erosion of press freedom in Canada after it emerged that police in Montreal had spent several months monitoring the phone of a journalist in order to identify his sources.

Fuente: Montreal police defend surveillance of journalist’s phone amid outcry | World news | The Guardian


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived.Today, The Intercept is announcing two innovations in how we report on and publish these materials. Both measures are designed to ensure that reporting on the archive continues in as expeditious and informative a manner as possible, in accordance with the agreements we entered into with our source about how these materials would be disclosed, a framework that he, and we, have publicly described on numerous occasions.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


Edward Snowden on police pursuing journalist data: the scandal is what the law allows | Australia news | The Guardian

NSA whistleblower responds to admission by Australian federal police that it investigated leaks to a Guardian journalist by requesting his metadata

Fuente: Edward Snowden on police pursuing journalist data: the scandal is what the law allows | Australia news | The Guardian


A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald

NSA WHISTLEBLOWER Edward Snowden joined MIT professor Noam Chomsky and The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald on Friday for a discussion on privacy rights hosted by the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The panel was moderated by Nuala O’Connor, the president of the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Fuente: A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald


Edward Snowden's message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian.

Guardian defence and intelligence correspondent Ewen MacAskill reads out a message to Guardian readers at a Members’ screening of Citizenfour in London. MacAskill joined editor-in-chief Alan Rusbriger, Janine Gibson and Stuart Millar to discuss the Snowden story in Kings Place on 2 March 2015.


The "Snowden is Ready to Come Home!" Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept

The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept.

Featured photo - The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit

Most sentient people rationally accept that the U.S. media routinely disseminates misleading stories and outright falsehoods in the most authoritative tones. But it’s nonetheless valuable to examine particularly egregious case studies to see how that works. In that spirit, let’s take yesterday’s numerous, breathless reports trumpeting the “BREAKING” news that “Edward Snowden now wants to come home!” and is “now negotiating the terms of his return!”

Ever since Snowden revealed himself to the public 20 months ago, he has repeatedly said the same exact thing when asked about his returning to the U.S.: I would love to come home, and would do so if I could get a fair trial, but right now, I can’t.

His primary rationale for this argument has long been that under the Espionage Act, the 1917 statute under which he has been charged, he would be barred by U.S. courts from even raising his key defense: that the information he revealed to journalists should never have been concealed in the first place and he was thus justified in disclosing it to journalists. In other words, when U.S. political and media figures say Snowden should “man up,” come home and argue to a court that he did nothing wrong, they are deceiving the public, since they have made certain that whistleblowers charged with “espionage” are legally barred from even raising that defense.


Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción.

El documental de Laura Poitras cuenta los primeros momentos de la mayor filtración de espionaje de un Gobierno en la historia

La existencia de un segundo filtrador dentro de la NSA y el reencuentro de Snowden con su pareja en Moscú son las dos revelaciones del documental

La fecha de estreno en España está prevista para el 27 de marzo

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

La película de Laura Poitras es un documental imprescindible para entender esta nueva etapa de internet. Citizenfour es, primero, un documento histórico que recoge de primerísima mano el encuentro de Edward Snowden con los periodistas que le ayudaron a revelar al mundo el mayor espionaje masivo conocido; y después, una película inquietante, donde es la información y no la música la que nos hace darnos cuenta de que no estamos viendo ciencia ficción.

Como dice Snowden a un absorto Glenn Greenwald tras contarle cómo funciona XKeyscore, un programa de la NSA: “Esto ya está sucediendo”.


How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian

How have journalists responded to revelations of mass surveillance? | Technology | The Guardian.

Two thirds of investigative journalists think they're being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that.

 Two thirds of investigative journalists think they’re being spied on, and many are taking action to combat that. Photograph: PAWEL KOPCZYNSKI/REUTERS

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations of mass surveillance by government agencies has made a big impact on investigative journalists, according to a new study.

The survey of 671 journalists, conducted by the US-based Pew Research Center and Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, found that 64% believe that the US government has probably collected data about their communications.

49% said that they have changed the way they store and share potentially sensitive documents in the last year as a result, while 29% have altered the way they communicate with fellow journalists.

However, only 3% have opted not to pursue a particular story due to concerns about electronic surveillance and hacking, although 13% have not reached out to a particular source for those reasons. Just 2% have considered abandoning investigative journalism.


How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept

How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How to Leak to The Intercept

People often tell reporters things their employers, or their government, want to keep suppressed. But leaking can serve the public interest, fueling revelatory and important journalism.

This publication was created in part as a platform for journalism arising from unauthorized disclosures by NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Our founders and editors are strongly committed to publishing stories based on leaked material when that material is newsworthy and serves the public interest. So ever since The Intercept launched, our staff has tried to put the best technology in place to protect our sources. Our website has been protected with HTTPS encryption from the beginning. All of our journalists publish their PGP keys on their staff profiles so that readers can send them encrypted email. And we’ve been running a SecureDrop server, an open source whistleblower submission system, to make it simpler and more secure for anonymous sources to get in touch with us.

But caution is still advised to those who want to communicate with us without exposing their real-world identities.


GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian.

 

• Snowden files reveal emails of BBC, NY Times and more
• Agency includes investigative journalists on ‘threat’ list
• Editors call on Cameron to act against snooping on media

 

GCHQ
The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by GCHQ. Photograph: GCHQ/EPA

GCHQ’s bulk surveillance of electronic communications has scooped up emails to and from journalists working for some of the US and UK’s largest media organisations, analysis of documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Emails from the BBC, Reuters, the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde, the Sun, NBC and the Washington Post were saved by GCHQ and shared on the agency’s intranet as part of a test exercise by the signals intelligence agency.

The disclosure comes as the British government faces intense pressure to protect the confidential communications of reporters, MPs and lawyers from snooping.

The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in the space of less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by one of GCHQ’s numerous taps on the fibre-optic cables that make up the backbone of the internet.

The communications, which were sometimes simple mass-PR emails sent to dozens of journalists but also included correspondence between reporters and editors discussing stories, were retained by GCHQ and were available to all cleared staff on the agency intranet. There is nothing to indicate whether or not the journalists were intentionally targeted.

The mails appeared to have been captured and stored as the output of a then-new tool being used to strip irrelevant data out of the agency’s tapping process.

New evidence from other UK intelligence documents revealed by Snowden also shows that a GCHQ information security assessment listed “investigative journalists” as a threat in a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers.


‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian

‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian.

Campaigners fear draft code of Ripa legislation will allow police sweeping powers to access phone and email records of journalists, lawyers and doctors
Armed police officers Houses of Parliament
Armed police officers inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament in London. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

An urgent campaign has been launched for a “freedom of expression” law to protect confidential journalists’, MPs’ and lawyers’ phone and communications records being secretly snooped on by the police.

Senior editors and lawyers condemned as “wholly inadequate” safeguards put forward by Theresa May in December to meet concerns over the police use of surveillance powers in a code of practice linked to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (Ripa).

The critics of the draft code fear that the police will still have sweeping powers allowing them to authorise themselves to access the phone and email records of professionals such as journalists, lawyers, doctors, MPs and priests who handle privileged, confidential information.

More than 3,000 national and regional editors are being asked to sign a joint letter from the Society of Editors and Press Gazette, the industry’s journal, condemning the Home Office joint code for failing to recognise “the overarching importance of protecting journalists’ sources”.

The campaign comes as the prime minister, David Cameron, called for an extension of the laws that give snooping powers to security services with a plan to ban encrypted messages in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo Paris attacks.


Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept

Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept.

BY NATASHA VARGAS-COOPER 

Featured photo - Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism

As curious journalists, tabloid writers, and Hollywood watchers pore over the massive trove of hacked Sony data, the public is being given a rare glimpse into the complicated world of Hollywood and politics. Tucked between bitchy emails about Angelina Jolie and snarky comments on Will Smith’s family are details of a chummy relationship between Sony executives and the CIA, as well as rare insight into how Hollywood views potential movies about NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Sony’s plan to make a Snowden movie got rolling in January 2014, when Elizabeth Cantillon, then an executive producer at Sony, sentcompany Co-Chairman Amy Pascal an email saying she had successfully closed on the rights to the book, “No Place to Hide,” by The Intercept‘s founding editor, Glenn Greenwald.  “[Y]ou will be my Oscar date,” Cantillon promised Pascal.

In March of 2014, Sony officially optioned the rights to Greenwald’s book, which chronicles how he broke the Snowden story, and moved forward with plans for a movie.


Laura Poitras: "Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo"

Laura Poitras: “Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo”.

La documentalista que ayudó a Snowden presenta su documental en Europa, ‘Citizenfour’, donde muestra cómo fue la preparación de la mayor filtración de la historia

“Snowden no está cooperando o trabajando para ninguna otra agencia de inteligencia, eso es simplemente una historia creada por el Gobierno”, asegura la periodista, elegida por el propio extrabajador de la NSA para hacer pública su filtración

“Lo que Glenn y yo publicamos ahora con Snowden cuestiona directamente el liderazgo de Obama”

 

 

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

 

 

A estas alturas de la película, ¿quién no sabe quién es Edward Snowden? Su denuncia sobre los sistemas de espionaje masivo e indiscriminado utilizados por la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) contra gobiernos, corporaciones y hasta sus propios ciudadanos ha pasado ya a la historia como la mayor filtración de un trabajador de los servicios de inteligencia jamás publicada. Y si a alguien hemos de dar gracias por ello –además de al joven informático– es a Laura Poitras, documentalista estadounidense afincada en Berlín, a quien Citizenfour eligió para hacer pública su historia “sin importar lo que le pasara a él”. Ella, arriesgando también su vida, así lo hizo.


Jacob Appelbaum: "La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social"

Jacob Appelbaum: “La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social”.

Appelbaum, una de las caras visibles del proyecto TOR, reclama que la sociedad sea consciente de que debe protegerse de los abusos del Estado con tecnología y nuevas leyes

“Están intentando asustar a la sociedad y decir a la ciudadanía que el uso de estas herramientas es terrorífico, pero lo que no nos cuentan es cómo ellos utilizan los sistemas de vigilancia para matar gente”

“Con las revelaciones de Snowden simplemente hemos pasado de la teoría a la certeza”

 

 

Jacob Appelbaum | Foto: COP:DOX  http://cphdox.dk/sites/default/files/styles/title-top/public/title/24276.jpg?itok=tGB_VZdM

Jacob Appelbaum, investigador, hacker y miembro de Proyecto Tor | Foto: CPH:DOX

 

 

Cryptoparties hay muchas. Cientos de ellas se celebran cada hora en cualquier parte del mundo, en un café, en la parte trasera de una tienda o incluso off the radar si se trata de compartir conocimientos con activistas o periodistas que trabajan en condiciones de riesgo. Las hay que ya han pasado a la historia como la organizada en 2011 via Twitter por la activista austaliana Asher Wolf, considerada la chispa de lo que en apenas semanas pasó a convertirse en un movimiento social a escala global, o la promovida por un –entonces aún desconocido—  Edward Snowden en un hacklab de Hawái cuando aún trabajaba para la NSA, y apenas un mes antes de contactar con Laura Poitras para revelarle el mayor escándalo de espionaje masivo conocido hasta el momento.

Sin embargo, una cryptoparty que reúna en una misma sala, precisamente, a la confidente de Snowden y directora del documental Citizenfour, Poitras; al activista, experto en seguridad informática y desarrollador de TOR, Jacob Appelbaum; y a William Binney –exoficial de inteligencia de la NSA convertido en whistleblower más de una década antes de que Snowden lo hiciera— solo hay una: la celebrada la semana pasada en el Bremen Theater de Copenhague con motivo del estreno del documental de Poitras en el festival internacional de cine documental CPH: DOX.

“Hace diez años nadie hubiera pensado en organizar un evento para hablar de esto, hubieran pensado que estábamos locos” comenta Jacob Appelbaum, uno de los gurús de la criptografía, miembro del equipo desarrollador de TOR y activista implacable en la lucha contra los sistemas de vigilancia masivos empleados por los gobiernos de distintos países. Eso demuestra que algo ha cambiado. Y lo dice la persona que precisamente inició en esto de la criptografía a la mismísima Poitras, cuyos conocimientos (y trayectoria cinematográfica, que incluía un corto documental sobre William Binney) fueron determinantes cuando Snowden eligió a quién revelaría su preciado secreto, aunque como el propio Citizenfour prefiere plantearlo, ella misma se eligió.

“Había empezado a utilizar criptografía cuando comencé a comunicarme con Jake”, contó Poitras. “Estaba muy interesada en su trabajo entrenando a activistas alrededor del mundo en cómo sortear los sistemas de vigilancia. Así que tuve que cargarme las pilas, me bajé algunas herramientas, en concreto usaba dos: PGP Email y chat OTR”, las mismas herramientas que Snowden enseñó a instalar a Glenn Greenwald para poder comunicarse de forma segura.

“Recuerdo que mandé un email a Jake explicándole quién era y el documental en el que estaba trabajando. Enseguida me contestó y me dijo que teníamos verificar las fingerprints, yo no tenía ni idea de lo que estaba hablando, así que me hice la entendida, le pedí unos minutos para ganar tiempo y me puse a buscar online de qué iba eso de las fingerprints“. “La verdad es que fue muy buen profesor y luego me enseñó muchas más cosas, que luego aparentemente fueron bastante oportunas cuando en enero de 2013 recibí el primer email de un tal Citizenfour pidiéndome mi clave pública”.


The NSA and Me – The Intercept

The NSA and Me – The Intercept.

By James Bamford

The tone of the answering machine message was routine, like a reminder for a dental appointment. But there was also an undercurrent of urgency. “Please call me back,” the voice said. “It’s important.”

What worried me was who was calling: a senior attorney with the Justice Department’s secretive Office of Intelligence Policy and Review. By the time I hung up the payphone at a little coffee shop in Cambridge, Mass., and wandered back to my table, strewn with yellow legal pads and dog-eared documents, I had guessed what he was after: my copy of the Justice Department’s top-secret criminal file on the National Security Agency. Only two copies of the original were ever made. Now I had to find a way to get it out of the country—fast.

It was July 8, 1981, a broiling Wednesday in Harvard Square, and I was in a quiet corner of the Algiers Coffee House on Brattle Street. A cool, souk-like basement room, with the piney aroma of frankincense, it made for a perfect hideout to sort through documents, jot down notes, and pore over stacks of newspapers while sipping bottomless cups of Arabic coffee and espresso the color of dark chocolate.

1967-Hawaii-Boat-21

The author in Hawaii, 1967

For several years I had been working on my first book, The Puzzle Palace, which provided the first in-depth look at the National Security Agency. The deeper I dug, the more troubled I became. Not only did the classified file from the Justice Department accuse the NSA of systematically breaking the law by eavesdropping on American citizens, it concluded that it was impossible to prosecute those running the agency because of the enormous secrecy that enveloped it. Worse, the file made clear that the NSA itself was effectively beyond the law—allowed to bypass statutes passed by Congress and follow its own super-classified charter, what the agency called a “top-secret birth certificate” drawn up by the White House decades earlier.

Knowing the potential for such an unregulated agency to go rogue, I went on to write two more books about the NSA, Body of Secrets, in 2001, and The Shadow Factory, in 2008. My goal was to draw attention to the dangers the agency posed if it is not closely watched and controlled—dangers that would be laid bare in stark detail by Edward Snowden years later.


The Guardian wins an Emmy for coverage of NSA revelations | World news | theguardian.com

The Guardian wins an Emmy for coverage of NSA revelations | World news | theguardian.com.

Interactive NSA Decoded explained implications of the Edward Snowden leaks on mass surveillance by intelligence agencies

 

 

Guardian NSA Emmy
The team behind the award-winning interactive. Photograph: Guardian

 

The Guardian US has won an Emmy for its groundbreaking coverage of Edward Snowden’s disclosures about mass surveillance by US intelligence agencies.

 

The Guardian’s multimedia interactive feature NSA Decoded was announced as the winner in the new approaches: current news category at the news and documentary Emmy awards in New York on Tuesday night.

 

The comprehensive interactive walks the audience through the facts and implications of the NSA’s mass surveillance program, revealed by the Guardian last year in coverage based on leaks by Snowden.


Snowden: Internet no es el enemigo al igual que no lo es Irak | SurySur

Snowden: Internet no es el enemigo al igual que no lo es Irak | SurySur.

eeuu edward snowden

Pocos tienen el privilegio de entrevistar a Edward Snowden, aún por videoconferencia, después de que destapara, por medio de filtraciones a los periodistas, uno de los mayores escándalos, o el que más, de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional estadounidense (NSA por sus siglas en inglés).

TED Talks lo ha conseguido. El programa de Tecnología, Entretenimiento y Diseño con más de 900 charlas (que se pueden descargar gratuitamente), traducidas a 80 idiomas y, hasta 2011, visitadas por más de 400 millones de veces, lo ha entrevistado en una curiosa videoconferencia. Al parecer, el programa estadounidense ha creído que las de Snowden sí eran “Ideas dignas de difundir” (el lema del espacio televisivo), al contrario de lo que pueda pensar su país.


NPR Is Laundering CIA Talking Points to Make You Scared of NSA Reporting – The Intercept

NPR Is Laundering CIA Talking Points to Make You Scared of NSA Reporting – The Intercept.

By and 514
Featured photo - NPR Is Laundering CIA Talking Points to Make You Scared of NSA Reporting Photo credit: Charles Dharapak/AP

On August 1, NPR’s Morning Edition broadcast a story by NPR national security reporter Dina Temple-Raston touting explosive claims from what she called “a tech firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.” That firm, Recorded Future, worked together with “a cyber expert, Mario Vuksan, the CEO of ReversingLabs,” to produce a new report that purported to vindicate the repeated accusation from U.S. officials that “revelations from former NSA contract worker Edward Snowden harmed national security and allowed terrorists to develop their own countermeasures.”

The “big data firm,” reported NPR, says that it now “has tangible evidence” proving the government’s accusations. Temple-Raston’s four-minute, 12-second story devoted the first 3 minutes and 20 seconds to uncritically repeating the report’s key conclusion that ”just months after the Snowden documents were released, al-Qaeda dramatically changed the way its operatives interacted online” and, post-Snowden, “al-Qaeda didn’t just tinker at the edges of its seven-year-old encryption software; it overhauled it.” The only skepticism in the NPR report was relegated to 44 seconds at the end when she quoted security expert Bruce Schneier, who questioned the causal relationship between the Snowden disclosures and the new terrorist encryption programs, as well as the efficacy of the new encryption.


Un informe alerta de que el espionaje amenaza la libertad de prensa en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Un informe alerta de que el espionaje amenaza la libertad de prensa en EE UU | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Human Rights Watch y American Civil Liberties Union critican los programas de la Administración

Logotipo de la NSA, en su sede a las afueras de Washington DC. / AP

Los programas de espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA, por sus siglas en inglés) y la ofensiva del Gobierno de Barack Obama para evitar cualquier filtración interna están socavando la libertad de prensa y el derecho a la asistencia letrada en Estados Unidos. Esta es la contundente conclusión de un informe, difundido este lunes, por las organizaciones Human Rights Watch y American Civil Liberties Union.

“Las fuentes están menos dispuestas a hablar con la prensa y se está ralentizando la cobertura informativa”, lamentó en el acto de presentación Alex Sinha, el autor del documento, basado en 90 entrevistas a periodistas, abogados y cargos gubernamentales en el último año. “Si EE UU fracasa en abordar estas preocupaciones con rapidez y eficacia, podría causar un serio y duradero daño a la democracia en el país”.

La presión oficial está forzando a periodistas y fuentes a rescatar formas de comunicación del pasado u optar por técnicas similares a las que usan los criminales, como hablar mediante cabinas telefónicas, usar teléfonos móviles desechables o mantener encuentros en persona sin ningún teléfono móvil. Todo ello para evitar que las comunicaciones puedan ser analizadas por la Administración y ante el creciente temor que ese rastro digital pueda ser usado en su contra.

El Gobierno de Obama, deploró Sinha, ha acusado en los tribunales a más fuentes informativas que todos los otros gobiernos estadounidenses juntos. Desde que llegó a la Casa Blanca en 2009, el presidente demócrata ha sido más agresivo que sus predecesores en silenciar filtraciones de asuntos de seguridad: su administración ha llevado a ocho personas a los tribunales, no ha tenido reparos en espiar directamente a periodistas –como hizo en 2012 con reporteros de la agencia Associated Press– y, desde que el exanalista Edward Snowden destapó hace un año la recolección masiva de datos por parte de la NSA, ha redoblado sus esfuerzos en detectar “amenazas internas” de empleados gubernamentales que podrían filtrar información confidencial.

Estados Unidos se presenta como un modelo de libertad y democracia, pero sus programas de espionaje están amenazando los valores que dice representar”

Alex Sinha, autor del informe

“Estados Unidos se presenta como un modelo de libertad y democracia, pero sus programas de espionaje están amenazando los valores que dice representar”, subrayó el investigador. “El Gobierno tiene la obligación de defender la seguridad nacional, pero muchos de sus programas de vigilancia van más allá de lo que podría ser justificado como necesario y proporcionado”.

En el terreno judicial, el informe alerta de que el escrutinio masivo ha puesto en duda la capacidad de los letrados de cumplir con su responsabilidad de garantizar la confidencialidad de la información de sus clientes. “Los abogados tienen mayores dificultades en conseguir que sus clientes confíen en ellos o en resguardar su estrategia legal”, apunta.


I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian

I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian.

Fiction and films, the nearest most of us knowingly get to the world of espionage, give us a series of reliable stereotypes. British spies are hard-bitten, libidinous he-men. Russian agents are thickset, low-browed and facially scarred. And defectors end up as tragic old soaks in Moscow, scanning old copies of the Times for news of the Test match.

Such a fate was anticipated for Edward Snowden by Michael Hayden, a former NSA and CIA chief, who predicted last September that the former NSA analyst would be stranded in Moscow for the rest of his days – “isolated, bored, lonely, depressed… and alcoholic”.

But the Edward Snowden who materialises in our hotel room shortly after noon on the appointed day seems none of those things. A year into his exile in Moscow, he feels less, not more, isolated. If he is depressed, he doesn’t show it. And, at the end of seven hours of conversation, he refuses a beer. “I actually don’t drink.” He smiles when repeating Hayden’s jibe. “I was like, wow, their intelligence is worse than I thought.”

Oliver Stone, who is working on a film about the man now standing in room 615 of the Golden Apple hotel on Moscow’s Malaya Dmitrovka, might struggle to make his subject live up to the canon of great movie spies. The American director has visited Snowden in Moscow, and wants to portray him as an out-and-out hero, but he is an unconventional one: quiet, disciplined, unshowy, almost academic in his speech. If Snowden has vices – and God knows they must have been looking for them – none has emerged in the 13 months since he slipped away from his life as a contracted NSA analyst in Hawaii, intent on sharing the biggest cache of top-secret material the world has ever seen.

Since arriving in Moscow, Snowden has been keeping late and solitary hours – effectively living on US time, tapping away on one of his three computers (three to be safe; he uses encrypted chat, too). If anything, he appears more connected and outgoing than he could be in his former life as an agent. Of his life now, he says, “There’s actually not that much difference. You know, I think there are guys who are just hoping to see me sad. And they’re going to continue to be disappointed.”

When the Guardian first spoke to Snowden a year ago in Hong Kong, he had been dishevelled, his hair uncombed, wearing jeans and a T-shirt. The 31-year-old who materialised last week was smartly, if anonymously, dressed in black trousers and grey jacket, his hair tidily cut. He is jockey-light – even skinnier than a year ago. And he looks pale: “Probably three steps from death,” he jokes. “I mean, I don’t eat a whole lot. I keep a weird schedule. I used to be very active, but just in the recent period I’ve had too much work to focus on.”

 Edward Snowden – video interview

There was no advance warning of where we would meet: his only US television interview, with NBC’s Brian Williams in May, was conducted in an anonymous hotel room of Snowden’s choosing. This time, he prefers to come to us. On his arrival, there is a warm handshake for Guardian reporter Ewen MacAskill, whom he last saw in Hong Kong – a Sunday night after a week of intense work in a frowsty hotel room, a few hours before the video revealing his identity to the world went public. Neither man knew if they would ever meet again.

Snowden orders chicken curry from room service and, as he forks it down, is immediately into the finer points of the story that yanked him from a life of undercover anonymity to global fame. The Snowden-as-alcoholic jibe is not the only moment when he reflects wryly on his former colleagues’ patchy ability to get on top of events over the past year. There was, for instance, the incident last July when a plane carrying President Evo Morales back to Bolivia from Moscow was forced down in Vienna and searched for a stowaway Snowden. “I was like, first off, wow, their intelligence sucks, from listening to everything. But, two, are they really going to the point of just completely humiliating the president of a Latin American nation, the representative of so many people? It was just shockingly poorly thought out, and yet they did it anyway, and they keep at these sort of mistakes.” It was as if they were trying not to find him. “I almost felt like I had some sort of friend in government.”


Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept

Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop Destruction – The Intercept.

By 162
Featured photo - Newly Obtained Emails Contradict Administration Claims on Guardian Laptop DestructionDocuments obtained from the Obama administration from an Associated Press FOIA request

On July 20, 2013, agents of the U.K. government entered The Guardian newsroom in London and compelled them to physically destroy the computers they were using to report on the Edward Snowden archive. The Guardian reported this a month later after my partner, David Miranda, was detained at Heathrow Airport for 11 hours under a British terrorism law and had all of his electronic equipment seized. At the time, the Obama administration—while admitting that it was told in advance of the Heathrow detention—pretended that it knew nothing about the forced laptop destruction and would never approve of such attacks on press freedom. From the August 20, 2013, press briefing by then-deputy White House press secretary Josh Earnest:

Q: A last one on the NSA—The Guardian newspaper, following on everything that was discussed yesterday—The Guardian is saying that British authorities destroyed several hard drives, because they wanted to keep secrets that Edward Snowden had leaked from actually getting out.  They were stored in The Guardian‘s—they had some hard drives there at their offices.  British authorities went in there and destroyed these hard drives. Did the American government get a heads up about that the way you did about the person being detained?

MR. EARNEST:  I’ve seen the published reports of those accusations, but I don’t have any information for you on that.

Q: And does the U.S. government think it’s appropriate for a government, especially one of our allies, to go in and destroy hard drives? Is that something this administration would do?

MR. EARNEST: The only thing I know about this are the public reports about this, so it’s hard for me to evaluate the propriety of what they did based on incomplete knowledge of what happened.

Q: But this administration would not do that, would not go into an American media company and destroy hard drives, even if it meant trying to protect national security, you don’t think?

MR. EARNEST: It’s very difficult to imagine a scenario in which that would be appropriate.

But emails just obtained by Associated Press pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request (FOIA) prove that senior Obama national security officials— including Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and then-NSA chief Keith Alexander—not only knew in advance that U.K. officials intended to force The Guardian to destroy their computers, but overtly celebrated it.


The ultimate goal of the NSA is total population control | Antony Loewenstein | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The ultimate goal of the NSA is total population control | Antony Loewenstein | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

At least 80% of all audio calls, not just metadata, are recorded and stored in the US, says whistleblower William Binney – that’s a ‘totalitarian mentality’

William Binney testifies before a German inquiry into surveillance.
William Binney testifies before a German inquiry into surveillance. Photograph: Getty Images

William Binney is one of the highest-level whistleblowers to ever emerge from the NSA. He was a leading code-breaker against the Soviet Union during the Cold War but resigned soon after September 11, disgusted by Washington’s move towards mass surveillance.

On 5 July he spoke at a conference in London organised by the Centre for Investigative Journalism and revealed the extent of the surveillance programs unleashed by the Bush and Obama administrations.

“At least 80% of fibre-optic cables globally go via the US”, Binney said. “This is no accident and allows the US to view all communication coming in. At least 80% of all audio calls, not just metadata, are recorded and stored in the US. The NSA lies about what it stores.”

The NSA will soon be able to collect 966 exabytes a year, the total of internet traffic annually. Former Google head Eric Schmidt once arguedthat the entire amount of knowledge from the beginning of humankind until 2003 amount to only five exabytes.

Binney, who featured in a 2012 short film by Oscar-nominated US film-maker Laura Poitras, described a future where surveillance is ubiquitous and government intrusion unlimited.

“The ultimate goal of the NSA is total population control”, Binney said, “but I’m a little optimistic with some recent Supreme Court decisions, such as law enforcement mostly now needing a warrant before searching a smartphone.”


Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Se cumplen 24 meses de la entrada del ‘exhacker’ en la Embajada ecuatoriana en Londres

 

/ Londres / Quito 18 JUN 2014 – 21:40 CET

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

 

El pulso político y diplomático que encarna el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, permanece enquistado cuando se cumplen este jueves dos años de su entrada en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres, donde sigue refugiado bajo riesgo de ser arrestado si pone un pie fuera del recinto. Mientras el Gobierno ecuatoriano sostiene que el exhacker, que la fiscalía sueca quiere interrogar por posibles delitos sexuales, “no es un fugitivo” sino un asilado bajo su amparo, las autoridades británicas persisten en su empeño de detenerlo por haber violado los términos de la libertad condicional aquel 19 de junio de 2012, y mantienen un cerco policial en torno a la legación cuya factura ya roza los seis millones de libras.

 

En todas las entrevistas hechas a Assange, durante los dos años que lleva en el recinto diplomático, ha habido una pregunta constante. ¿Cómo es vivir en una embajada? Sus respuestas han permitido conocer que pasa los días confinado en una oficina de 20 metros cuadrados convertida en habitación. En ese espacio trabaja (jornadas de 17 horas frente a un ordenador), se ejercita (en una cinta para correr que le regaló el cineasta Ken Loach) y recibe visitas, según los reportes del periódico británico The Daily Mail en 2012. Por declaraciones de uno de sus abogados, Baltasar Garzón, se sabe que su mobiliario incluye una cama, una mesa, una estantería y ahí se acaba su mundo.

 

El propio australiano comparecerá en una rueda de prensa en conexión internauta este jueves con el ministro de Exteriores ecuatoriano, Ricardo Patiño, según este anunció su cuenta de Twitter sin precisar más detalles.


Encouraging Words of Regret From Dean Baquet and Weasel Words From James Clapper – The Intercept

Encouraging Words of Regret From Dean Baquet and Weasel Words From James Clapper – The Intercept.

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Featured photo - Encouraging Words of Regret From Dean Baquet and Weasel Words From James ClapperNew York Times executive editor Dean Baquet (AP Photo/Bill Haber)

NPR’s David Folkenflik has a revealing new look at what I have long believed is one of the most important journalistic stories of the last decade: The New York Times‘ 2004 decision, at the behest of George W. Bush himself, to suppress for 15 months (through Bush’s re-election) its reporters’ discovery that the NSA was illegally eavesdropping on Americans without warrants. Folkenflik’s NPR story confirms what has long been clear: The only reason the Times eventually published that article was because one of its reporters, James Risen, had become so frustrated that he wrote a book that was about to break the story, leaving the paper with no choice (Risen’s co-reporter, Eric Lichtblau, is quoted this way: “‘He had a gun to their head,’ Lichtblau told Frontline. ‘They are really being forced to reconsider: The paper is going to look pretty bad’ if Risen’s book disclosed the wiretapping program before the Times“).

As Folkenflik notes, this episode was one significant reason Edward Snowden purposely excluded the Times from his massive trove of documents. In an interview with Folkenflik, the paper’s new executive editor, Dean Baquet, describes the paper’s exclusion from the Snowden story as “really painful.” But, as I documented in my book and in recent interviews, Baquet hashis own checkered history in suppressing plainly newsworthy stories at the government’s request, including a particularly inexcusable 2007 decision, when he was the managing editor of The Los Angeles Timesto kill a story based on AT&T whistleblower Mark Klein’s revelations that the NSA had built secret rooms at AT&T to siphon massive amounts of domestic telephone traffic.


Guardian launches SecureDrop system for whistleblowers to share files | Technology | theguardian.com

Guardian launches SecureDrop system for whistleblowers to share files | Technology | theguardian.com.

SecureDrop platform allows sources to submit documents and data while avoiding most common forms of online tracking

SecureDrop
SecureDrop makes use of well-known anonymising technology such as the Tor network and the Tails operating system

The Guardian has launched a secure platform for whistleblowers to securely submit confidential documents to the newspaper’s reporters.

The launch comes a year to the day since the Guardian posted the first of a series of NSA documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, sparking a worldwide debate on surveillance, privacy, and civil liberties.

Free speech and privacy groups alongside popular sites including Reddit, BoingBoing and Imgur, are marking the day with a Reset the Net campaign, encouraging internet users to take direct action to secure their privacy online. Several technology companies are also expected to announce new steps to protect users’ privacy over the course of the day.

The SecureDrop open-source whistleblowing platform provides a way for sources, who can choose to remain anonymous, to submit documents and data while avoiding virtually all of the most common forms of online tracking.

It makes use of well-known anonymising technology such as the Tor network and the Tails operating system, which was used by journalists working on the Snowden files.


Edward Snowden NSA whistleblowing story to be filmed by Oliver Stone | Film | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden NSA whistleblowing story to be filmed by Oliver Stone | Film | theguardian.com.

Director of Platoon and JFK will direct a big budget adaptation of Guardian journalist Luke Harding’s book about Snowden’s role in exposing the NSA’s surveillance culture• Oliver Stone on US history: ‘America always wins’

 

 

 

Edward Snowden

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. His story is being adapted into a film by director Oliver Stone. Photograph: Guardian

 

He has tackled the Kennedy assassination and the Watergate break-in, the Vietnam conflict and the Bush administration’s “war on terror”. Now the Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone is set to whip up fresh controversy with his adaptation of The Snowden Files, an account of the ongoing NSA scandal written by the Guardian journalist Luke Harding.

Stone’s thriller will focus on the experiences of the American whistleblower Edward Snowden, a contractor at the National Security Agency who leaked thousands of classified documents to the former Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald back in June 2013. The film is to be produced by Stone’s regular business partner Moritz Borman, with Harding and other Guardian journalists serving as production and story consultants.

“This is one of the greatest stories of our time,” Stone, 67, said in a statement. “A real challenge. I’m glad to have the Guardian working with us.” Stone’s previous films include Platoon, JFK and W. The director has also made documentaries on Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez, together with a 2012 TV series, Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States.

Snowden’s revelations, first reported in the Guardian, lifted the lid on a culture of mass government surveillance, sparked a global furore and forced the Obama administration onto the back foot. Secretary of state John Kerry later conceded that the NSA’s programme had “reached too far” and should be curtailed. Snowden’s fate, however, remains in the balance. The former NSA employee has been granted temporary asylum in Russia but faces a 30-year prison sentence if he returns to the US.

Published earlier this year, The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man charts the political awakening of the twentysomething Snowden, a committed Republican who found his libertarian values increasingly at odds with his government’s surveillance programme. A review in the New York Times hailed Harding’s book as “a fast-paced, almost novelistic narrative that is part bildungsroman and part cinematic thriller.”

Oliver Stone at the Beijing international film festival Oliver Stone, who will direct the biopic. Photograph: ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images


Pentagon report: scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden 'staggering' | World news | theguardian.com

Pentagon report: scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden ‘staggering’ | World news | theguardian.com.

• Classified assessment describes impact of leaks as ‘grave’
• Report does not include specific detail to support conclusions
• 12 of 39 heavily redacted pages released after Foia request

Read the full Defense Intelligence Agency report

 

 

Edward Snowden Meets With German Green Party MP Hans-Christian Stroebele In Moscow
The DIA report has been cited numerous times by politicians who claimed Snowden’s leaks have put US personnel at risk. Photograph: Sunshine Press/Getty

 

A top-secret Pentagon report to assess the damage to national security from the leak of classified National Security Agency documents by Edward Snowden concluded that “the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering”.

The Guardian has obtained a copy of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s classified damage assessment in response to a Freedom of Information Act (Foia) lawsuit filed against the Defense Department earlier this year. The heavily redacted 39-page report was prepared in December and is titled “DoD Information Review Task Force-2: Initial Assessment, Impacts Resulting from the Compromise of Classified Material by a Former NSA Contractor.”

But while the DIA report describes the damage to US intelligence capabilities as “grave”, the government still refuses to release any specific details to support this conclusion. The entire impact assessment was redacted from the material released to the Guardian under a presidential order that protects classified information and several other Foia exemptions.

Only 12 pages of the report were declassified by DIA and released. A Justice Department attorney said DIA would continue to process other internal documents that refer to the DIA report for possible release later this year.

Steven Aftergood, director of the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists, questioned the decision to withhold specific details.

“The essence of the report is contained in the statement that ‘the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering’. But all elaboration of what this striking statement means has been withheld,” he said.


Edward Snowden se convierte en héroe de cómic | Gente | EL PAÍS

Edward Snowden se convierte en héroe de cómic | Gente | EL PAÍS.


Imagen de la editorial Bluewater Productions de la portada del cómic basado en Edward Snowden. / EFE

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Edward Snowden, el antiguo colaborador de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) que filtró la información sobre el espionaje masivo de esa agencia, se ha convertido en el protagonista de un cómic. Escrito por Valerie D’Orazio y con dibujos de Dan Lauer, con un guion de carácter biográfico, el libro de historietas se publicará el miércoles tanto en papel como en formato digital, según ha anunciado en un comunicado la editorial Bluewater Productions.

El cómic, denominado Beyond: Edward Snowden, trata de mostrar a la persona que se esconde detrás de los titulares e indaga en los motivos que le empujaron a llevar a cabo una de las mayores filtraciones de información clasificada de la historia de Estados Unidos, según explica la editorial. D’Orazio, autora del texto del cómic, dice que su trabajo “proporciona una mirada a una vertiente de Edward Snowden que el público nunca ha visto realmente antes”.


No Place to Hide review – Glenn Greenwald's compelling account of NSA/GCHQ surveillance | Books | The Observer

No Place to Hide review – Glenn Greenwald’s compelling account of NSA/GCHQ surveillance | Books | The Observer.

This powerful account of the Edward Snowden case reveals the threat posed by spying

 

 

Greenwald, books

The NSA’s threat operations centre in the Washington suburb of Fort Meade, Maryland. ‘The details of intrusion are shocking.’ Photograph: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty Images

 

Before Glenn Greenwald appeared on Newsnight last October to argue the case for the Snowden revelations on a link from Brazil, the presenter that evening, Kirsty Wark, popped into the green room to have a word with the other guests on the show, one of whom was Pauline Neville-Jones, formerly chair of the Joint Intelligence Committee. The interview, she apparently told them, would show that Greenwald was just “a campaigner and an activist”, a phrase she later used disparagingly on air.

 

And so the BBC went after the man, not the story. However, on this occasion, the man held his own rather well, roasting Wark and Neville-Jones with remorseless trial lawyer logic, making them look ill-prepared and silly in the process. At the time, I remember thinking that Edward Snowden had chosen exactly the right person for the job of chief advocate – a smart, unyielding, fundamentalist liberal outsider.

Some of these characteristics made me wonder if his account of the Snowden affair would be one long harangue, but No Place to Hide is clearly written and compelling. Though I have been writing about the war on liberty for nearly a decade, I found that reacquainting myself with the details of surveillance and intrusion  by America’s NSA and Britain’s GCHQ was simply shocking. As the stories rolled out last year, there was almost too much to absorb – from Prism, the program used by the NSA to access, among others, Google, Microsoft and Apple servers, to the UK’s Tempora, which taps fibre optic cables and draws up web and telephone traffic; from the secret collaboration of the web and phone giants to the subversion of internet encryption and spying on ordinary people’s political activities, their medical history, their friends and intimate relations and all their activities online. I published a dystopian novel in 2009 that featured a similarly intrusive program, which I named DEEPTRUTH, and let me tell you, I didn’t predict half of it.


Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters – The Intercept

Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters – The Intercept.

By 810
Featured photo - Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters Photo credit: Evan Vucci/AP

The just-retired long-time NSA chief, Gen. Keith Alexander, recently traveled to Australia to give a remarkably long and wide-ranging interview with an extremely sycophantic “interviewer” with The Australian Financial Review. The resulting 17,000-word transcript and accompanying article form a model of uncritical stenography journalism, but Alexander clearly chose to do this because he is angry, resentful, and feeling unfairly treated, and the result is a pile of quotes that are worth examining, only a few of which are noted below:

AFR: What were the key differences for you as director of NSA serving under presidents Bush and Obama? Did you have a preferred commander in chief?

Gen. Alexander: Obviously they come from different parties, they view things differently, but when it comes to the security of the nation and making those decisions about how to protect our nation, what we need to do to defend it, they are, ironically, very close to the same point. You would get almost the same decision from both of them on key questions about how to defend our nation from terrorists and other threats.

The almost-complete continuity between George W. Bush and Barack Obama on such matters has been explained by far too many senior officials in both parties, and has been amply documented in far too many venues, to make it newsworthy when it happens again. Still, the fact that one of the nation’s most powerful generals in history, who has no incentive to say it unless it were true, just comes right out and states that Bush and The Candidate of Change are “very close to the same point” and “you would get almost the same decision from both of them on key questions” is a fine commentary on a number of things, including how adept the 2008 Obama team was at the art of branding.

The fact that Obama, in 2008, specifically vowed to his followers angered over his campaign-season NSA reversal that he possessed “the firm intention — once I’m sworn in as president — to have my Attorney General conduct a comprehensive review of all our surveillance programs, and to make further recommendations on any steps needed to preserve civil liberties and to prevent executive branch abuse in the future” only makes that point a bit more vivid.


La Web 2.0: o cómo el sitial de la libertad dejó de ser tan libre

Hace algunas décadas atrás, bien es sabido que las páginas web tenían estándares de calidad mucho más bajos que los que reinan hoy en día. Es así, cómo de tener páginas que eran simples htmls exportados desde un archivo de texto hecho en word; se pasó a los blogs de opinión actual, los cuales hicieron al Internet un medio de comunicación al servicio del pueblo y de los marginados del sistema clásico del quinto poder.

Pero es de esperar que en unos años más, esto no sea más que un mero recuerdo. Los sitios con mayores facilidades para los novatos de la informática a veces poseen restricciones demasiado asfixiantes. Por dar un ejemplo, basta con buscar algo respecto al suicidio en tumblr para ser acosado con teléfonos de ayuda y mensajes anti-suicidio. Asimismo, es de conocimiento generalizado que en Estados Unidos tienen un grupo de personas que se dedican a espiar lo que hacen sus ciudadanos, supuestamente para evitar crímenes antes que estos sean cometidos. Pero ¿eso les corresponde?


Glenn Greenwald: 'I don't trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme' | World news | The Guardian

Glenn Greenwald: ‘I don’t trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme’ | World news | The Guardian.

He has been lauded and vilified in equal measure. But did the journalist’s ‘outsider’ status help him land Edward Snowden’s NSA revelations? Why did he nearly miss the story? And how powerless did he feel when his partner was detained at Heathrow? One year after the scoop, we meet him in his jungle paradise in Rio

 

 

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice'… Glenn Greenwald in Rio'

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice’… Glenn Greenwald in Rio’ Photograph: Jimmy Chalk for the Guardian

 

The dogs can smell Glenn Greenwald long before they see him. As we drive up the hill to his house, a cacophony of barking greets us. The chorus is so overwhelming it makes me think of the National Security Agency (NSA) chiefs who Greenwald has tormented over the past year.”They don’t bite,” Greenwald says as we are engulfed by the pack of strays that he and his partner, David Miranda, have rescued. After a beat, he adds: “… as long as you don’t show any fear.” I’m not certain he’s joking, which is awkward, given that there are 12 of them, ranging from an 80lb Burmese mountain dog to a rat-sized miniature pinscher.

The image of Greenwald and his dogs has been beamed around the world by news organisations since his first NSA revelations were published by the Guardian last year. A writer with a devoted following even before the revelations, he now enjoys more widespread exposure, particularly in the US where his brand of aggressive campaigning journalism has attracted both paeans and condemnation.

But the sight of him surrounded by the animals still comes as a shock. It underlines how dramatically the internet has revolutionised journalism and the nature of the newsroom.

Think of that legendary 1973 photograph of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein at the height of Watergate. They are sitting at manual typewriters under neon lights in the Washington Post newsroom. The photo speaks to the power of institutions – that of their newspaper just as much as the White House they were investigating.

Now think of where I’m standing in Glenn Greenwald’s retreat, shrouded in jackfruit, banana and lemon trees, where monkeys call in daily and only yesterday a lethal spider the size of a fist was discovered in the bathroom. This is the newsroom of 2014, almost 5,000 miles from Washington DC, the jungle office of the journalist that the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden handpicked to be his conduit to the outside world.

As the anniversary approaches of Greenwald’s first Guardian scoop on 5 June 2013, revealing that the NSA was collecting the telephone records of millions of Americans, his life appears to have calmed a bit. He’s taking the time to get his fitness back after a stressful period, doing yoga by a stream in the garden and eating calorie-controlled ready meals in an attempt to shed the 12lbs he put on.


El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Glenn Greenwald relata en su libro cuando Snowden pensaba que había sido descubierto


Glenn Greenwald, el 10 de junio de 2013, mientras atendía a los periodistas en su hotel de Hong Kong. / VINCENT YU (AP)

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El jueves [6 de junio], ya el quinto día en Hong Kong, fui a la habitación de hotel de Snowden, quien enseguida me dijo que tenía noticias “algo alarmantes”. Un dispositivo de seguridad conectado a Internet que compartía con su novia de toda la vida había detectado que dos personas de la NSA —alguien de recursos humanos y un “policía” de la agencia— habían acudido a su casa buscándole a él.

Para Snowden eso significaba casi con seguridad que la NSA [Agencia Nacional de Seguridad de EE UU] lo había identificado como la probable fuente de las filtraciones, pero yo me mostré escéptico. “Si creyeran que tú has hecho esto, mandarían hordas de agentes del FBI y seguramente unidades de élite, no un simple agente y una persona de recursos humanos”. Supuse que se trataba de una indagación automática y rutinaria, justificada por el hecho de que un empleado de la NSA se ausenta durante varias semanas sin dar explicaciones. Sin embargo, Snowden sugería que habían mandado gente de perfil bajo adrede para no llamar la atención de los medios ni desencadenar la eliminación de pruebas.

“En Guantánamo me pido la litera de abajo”, bromeó Snowden mientras meditaba sobre la estrategia a seguir

Al margen del significado de la noticia, recalqué la necesidad de preparar rápidamente el artículo y el vídeo en el que Snowden se daba a conocer como la fuente de las revelaciones. Estábamos decididos a que el mundo supiera de Snowden, de sus acciones y sus motivaciones, por el propio Snowden, no a través de una campaña de demonización lanzada por el Gobierno norteamericano mientras él estaba escondido o bajo custodia o era incapaz de hablar por sí mismo..


Guardian's Edward Snowden revelations receive backing in poll | Media | theguardian.com

Guardian’s Edward Snowden revelations receive backing in poll | Media | theguardian.com.

YouGov finds 37% of the British people thought it right to publish while 22% thought it wrong

 

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden: a majority of Britons back the Guardian’s reporting. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

 

A public opinion poll has found that more Britons think it was right for the Guardian to publish Edward Snowden‘s NSA leaks about surveillance than think it was wrong that the paper did so.

According to the YouGov poll, 37% of the British people thought it right to publish while 22% thought it wrong. Asked whether it was good or bad for society, 46% considered it good against 22% who regarded it as bad.


Glenn Greenwald book to contain 'new stories from the Snowden archive' | World news | theguardian.com

Glenn Greenwald book to contain ‘new stories from the Snowden archive’ | World news | theguardian.com.

Journalist who broke Guardian story about NSA surveillance says new documents ‘will help inform the debate even further’

 

 

Glenn Greenwald
Glenn Greenwald attends the George Polk Awards at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York. Photograph: Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

 

Glenn Greenwald, one of the journalists who broke the National Security Agency revelations from Edward Snowden in the Guardian, said on Sunday a book he is writing about the case will contain “a lot of new stories from the Snowden archive”.

Speaking to Brian Stelter, the host of CNN’s Reliable Sources, at the end of a week in which Guardian US and the Washington Post shared a Pulitzer prize for public service reporting, Greenwald said: “There are stories that I felt from the beginning really needed the length of a book to be able to report and to do justice to, so there’s new documents, [and] there’s new revelations in the book that I think will help inform the debate even further.”


Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama | Edward Snowden | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama | Edward Snowden | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

I questioned the Russian president live on TV to get his answer on the record, not to whitewash him

Vladimir Putin during the nationwide phone-in in Moscow.
Vladimir Putin during the nationwide phone-in in Moscow. Photograph: RIA Novosti/Reuters

On Thursday, I questioned Russia’s involvement in mass surveillance on live television. I asked Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, a question that cannot credibly be answered in the negative by any leader who runs a modern, intrusive surveillance program: “Does [your country] intercept, analyse or store millions of individuals’ communications?”

I went on to challenge whether, even if such a mass surveillance program were effective and technically legal, it could ever be morally justified.

The question was intended to mirror the now infamous exchange in US Senate intelligence committee hearings between senator Ron Wyden and the director of national intelligence, James Clapper, about whether the NSA collected records on millions of Americans, and to invite either an important concession or a clear evasion. (See a side-by-side comparison of Wyden’s question and mine here.)

Clapper’s lie – to the Senate and to the public – was a major motivating force behind my decision to go public, and a historic example of the importance of official accountability.

In his response, Putin denied the first part of the question and dodged on the latter. There are serious inconsistencies in his denial – and we’ll get to them soon – but it was not the president’s suspiciously narrow answer that was criticised by many pundits. It was that I had chosen to ask a question at all.

I was surprised that people who witnessed me risk my life to expose the surveillance practices of my own country could not believe that I might also criticise the surveillance policies of Russia, a country to which I have sworn no allegiance, without ulterior motive. I regret that my question could be misinterpreted, and that it enabled many to ignore the substance of the question – and Putin’s evasive response – in order to speculate, wildly and incorrectly, about my motives for asking it.


‘The Guardian’ y el ‘Post’ ganan el Pulitzer por las revelaciones de Snowden | Sociedad | EL PAÍS

‘The Guardian’ y el ‘Post’ ganan el Pulitzer por las revelaciones de Snowden | Sociedad | EL PAÍS.

 

 

El diario británico The Guardian ha obtenido su primer premio Pulitzer gracias al trabajo de Glenn Greenwald y Laura Poitras, los dos periodistas que publicaron los documentos filtrados por el exagente de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA), Edward Snowden. La exclusiva, compartida inicialmente con el diario The Washington Post está considerada como una de las noticias más importantes de los últimos años y ha consolidado la influencia de The Guardian en el sector mediático estadounidense.

 

El jurado destacó, en el caso de The Washington Post, que su exclusiva “ayudó a los ciudadanos a entender cómo las revelaciones encajan en el marco de la seguridad nacional”. Sobre el británico The Guardian, subrayó que su contribución “provocó, gracias a una investigación agresiva, la apertura de un debate sobre la relación entre el Gobierno y los ciudadanos en asuntos de seguridad y privacidad”.


Some Facts About How NSA Stories Are Reported – The Intercept

Some Facts About How NSA Stories Are Reported – The Intercept.

By 23 Mar 2014, 6:41 AM EDT

(updated below)

Several members of the august “US Journalists Against Transparency” club are outraged by revelations in yesterday’s New York Times (jointly published by der Spiegel) that the NSA has been hacking the products of the Chinese tech company Huawei as well as Huawei itself at exactly the same time (and in exactly the same way) as the US Government has been claiming the Chinese government hacks. Echoing the script of national security state officials, these journalists argue that these revelations are unjustified, even treasonous, because this is the type of spying the NSA should be doing, and disclosure serves no public interest while harming American national security, etc. etc.

True to form, however, these beacons of courage refuse to malign the parties that actually made the choice to publish these revelations – namely, the reporters and editors of the New York Times – and instead use it to advance their relentless attack on Edward Snowden. To these journalists, there are few worse sins than “stealing” the secrets of the US government and leaking them to the press (just as was true in the WikiLeaks case, one must congratulate the US Government on its outstanding propaganda feat of getting its journalists to lead the war on those who bring transparency to the nation’s most powerful factions). But beyond the abject spectacle of anti-transparency journalists, these claims are often based on factually false assumptions about how these stories are reported, making it worthwhile once again to underscore some of the key facts governing this process:


Is Revealing Secrets Akin to Drunk Driving? Intelligence Official Says So – The Intercept

Is Revealing Secrets Akin to Drunk Driving? Intelligence Official Says So – The Intercept.

By 

The intelligence community’s top lawyer on Friday defended the Obama administration’s hostility toward revelations of national security secrets — and likened the act of publishing them to drunk driving.

Robert Litt, general counsel to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, used the drunk-driving analogy to excuse his inability to cite any specific harm to individuals by news stories based on leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

“We ban drunk driving in this country,” Litt asserted, arguing on a panel with four top news editors that not every crime has an identifiable victim.

Litt made the same argument earlier this week, at an event in Washington for Sunshine Week:  ”Not every drunk driver causes a fatal accident, but we ban drunk driving because it increases the risk of accidents.  In the same way, we classify information because of the risk of harm, even if no harm actually can be shown in the end from any particular disclosure.”

But Litt’s analogy  did not go over well with the other members of the panel on Friday. New Yorker editor David Remnick fired back, incredulously: “Is journalism drunk driving??”

Remnick said that by Litt’s logic, any reporting on leaked material would cause damage. “Your balance is we do nothing,” he said.

Litt, who has become the point person for the administration’s defense of its surveillance programs, was speaking at a journalistic symposium on  Secrets and Sources in the New York Times  auditorium. He responded combatively to the event’s main theme: the importance of holding the government accountable.

“There ought to be an adversarial approach between the press and the government,” Litt said. “But,” he added with a touch of menace, ”it’s a two-way process.”


Reporteros Sin Fronteras (RSF) nombra a Estados Unidos como “enemigo de internet” – BioBioChile

Reporteros Sin Fronteras (RSF) nombra a Estados Unidos como “enemigo de internet” – BioBioChile.

 

US Embassy Panama (CC)US Embassy Panama (CC)

 

Publicado por Christian Leal | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña figuran entre los “enemigos de internet” señalados este miércoles en un informe anual de la organización Reporteros Sin Fronteras (RSF).

Publicado con motivo del día internacional contra la censura, el informe acusa a 31 instituciones como “enemigas de internet”, algunas de ellas pertenecientes a democracias tradicionalmente consideradas como respetuosas de las libertades individuales.

RSF incluyó en su lista negra a la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA) de Estados Unidos y al Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) de Gran Bretaña.

La NSA y el GCHQ, afirma, “espiaron las comunicaciones de varios millones de ciudadanos, incluyendo numerosos periodistas, introdujeron deliberadamente fallas de seguridad en estructuras destinadas a realizar búsquedas en internet, y piratearon el corazón mismo de la red en el marco de los programas Quantum Insert para la NSA y Tempora para el GCHQ”.

“Internet era un bien común, el NSA y el GCHQ lo convirtieron en arma al servicio de intereses particulares, atentando al pasar contra la libertad de información, la libertad de expresión y el derecho a la vida privada”, denuncia RSF, que también señala a un organismo de vigilancia de telecomunicaciones de la India.

“Las prácticas de vigilancia de esos tres países, algunas de las cuales fueron reveladas por el lanzador de alerta Edward Snowden, son tanto más intolerables cuanto que son utilizadas por países autoritarios como Irán, China, Turkmenistán, Arabia Saudita o Bahrein para justificar sus propios atentados contra la libertad de información”.


Can Greenwald's digital magazine Intercept help to reinvent journalism? | Media | The Guardian

Can Greenwald’s digital magazine Intercept help to reinvent journalism? | Media | The Guardian.

Founder plans non-hierarchical newsroom and wants to build First Look Media on collaboration

NSA

Watching brief … the US’s National Security Agency in Fort Meade, Maryland.

With $250m in funding from eBay founder Pierre Omidyar and some high profile journalist hires, First Look Media has set itself the lofty task of reinventing journalism for the digital age, starting with the traditional hierarchy of newsrooms.

Glenn Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist who broke a string of stories about widespread electronic surveillance by the National Security Agency based on files leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowdenwas first on board the Omidyar-backed venture and launched the new company’s first “digital magazine”, the Intercept, on 10 February. The online title will initially concentrate on the NSA, with the longer-term goal of producing “aggressive and independent adversarial journalism” on issues ranging from civil liberties to media.

Greenwald was joined last month by Rolling Stone contributing editor Matt Taibbi, who has built a formidable reputation for his reporting on the financial crisis. Taibbi will launch First Look’s second online title later this year, focused on the ongoing economic crisis and the political machinery that surrounds it. Greenwald, co-editor of the Intercept alongside documentary maker Laura Poitras, who previously worked with him on the NSA leaks, and Jeremy Scahill, formerly of the Nation, says the opportunity to build a news organisation from the ground up will allow him to put his theories on media into practice.

Among these is a belief in reorganising the newsroom. “We want to avoid this hierarchical, top-down structure where editors are bosses and obstacles to being published,” Greenwald explains. “We are trying to make it much more collaborative. Our journalists have a variety of tools to make their writing better and one of them is the editor. We also want journalists to help to hire editors.”

This spirit of collaboration extends to the site’s readers. Initial page traffic has been “huge – in the hundreds of thousands”, Greenwald says, with each article attracting hundreds of reader comments. “Journalism becomes ossified and corrupted where it is just a monologue, speaking down to your readers in a passive format,” he adds. “I see [comments] as a vital form of accountability.”

It is, of course, still early days for the Intercept, which Greenwald says launched “earlier than in an ideal world because we felt an obligation to get on with our reporting of the NSA documents, even though we weren’t really ready”. As a result, the look of the site – built on a basic WordPress template – is as yet merely functional. What’s more, Greenwald says the “digital magazine” tag that the Intercept employs is essentially branding, arising from the difficulty in describing what Omidyar wants to do with the new company. First Look Media will create what its backer calls “multiple digital publications”, each dedicated to a specific topic and each led by an experienced journalist. A flagship First Look Media site will launch later this year featuring original content, curated news and articles aggregated from this family of outlets.