The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian

“Muslims are like cockroaches. An infestation that needs to be eradicated. Immediately. Permanently”, reads the tweet by one of thousands of anonymous far-right Twitter accounts that spread hate against ethnic and religious minorities each day.

Fuente: The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian


Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden

While most eyes are focused on the presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, three major events prove how widespread, and dangerous, mass surveillance has become in the West. Standing alone, each event highlights exactly the severe threats that motivated Edward Snowden to blow his whistle; taken together, they constitute full-scale vindication of everything he’s done.

Fuente: Three New Scandals Show How Pervasive and Dangerous Mass Surveillance Is in the West, Vindicating Snowden


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Edward Snowden's message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian.

Guardian defence and intelligence correspondent Ewen MacAskill reads out a message to Guardian readers at a Members’ screening of Citizenfour in London. MacAskill joined editor-in-chief Alan Rusbriger, Janine Gibson and Stuart Millar to discuss the Snowden story in Kings Place on 2 March 2015.


GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian.

 

• Snowden files reveal emails of BBC, NY Times and more
• Agency includes investigative journalists on ‘threat’ list
• Editors call on Cameron to act against snooping on media

 

GCHQ
The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by GCHQ. Photograph: GCHQ/EPA

GCHQ’s bulk surveillance of electronic communications has scooped up emails to and from journalists working for some of the US and UK’s largest media organisations, analysis of documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Emails from the BBC, Reuters, the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde, the Sun, NBC and the Washington Post were saved by GCHQ and shared on the agency’s intranet as part of a test exercise by the signals intelligence agency.

The disclosure comes as the British government faces intense pressure to protect the confidential communications of reporters, MPs and lawyers from snooping.

The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in the space of less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by one of GCHQ’s numerous taps on the fibre-optic cables that make up the backbone of the internet.

The communications, which were sometimes simple mass-PR emails sent to dozens of journalists but also included correspondence between reporters and editors discussing stories, were retained by GCHQ and were available to all cleared staff on the agency intranet. There is nothing to indicate whether or not the journalists were intentionally targeted.

The mails appeared to have been captured and stored as the output of a then-new tool being used to strip irrelevant data out of the agency’s tapping process.

New evidence from other UK intelligence documents revealed by Snowden also shows that a GCHQ information security assessment listed “investigative journalists” as a threat in a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers.


‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian

‘Freedom of expression’ anti-snooping campaign launched over Ripa changes | Politics | The Guardian.

Campaigners fear draft code of Ripa legislation will allow police sweeping powers to access phone and email records of journalists, lawyers and doctors
Armed police officers Houses of Parliament
Armed police officers inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament in London. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

An urgent campaign has been launched for a “freedom of expression” law to protect confidential journalists’, MPs’ and lawyers’ phone and communications records being secretly snooped on by the police.

Senior editors and lawyers condemned as “wholly inadequate” safeguards put forward by Theresa May in December to meet concerns over the police use of surveillance powers in a code of practice linked to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (Ripa).

The critics of the draft code fear that the police will still have sweeping powers allowing them to authorise themselves to access the phone and email records of professionals such as journalists, lawyers, doctors, MPs and priests who handle privileged, confidential information.

More than 3,000 national and regional editors are being asked to sign a joint letter from the Society of Editors and Press Gazette, the industry’s journal, condemning the Home Office joint code for failing to recognise “the overarching importance of protecting journalists’ sources”.

The campaign comes as the prime minister, David Cameron, called for an extension of the laws that give snooping powers to security services with a plan to ban encrypted messages in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo Paris attacks.


Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Se cumplen 24 meses de la entrada del ‘exhacker’ en la Embajada ecuatoriana en Londres

 

/ Londres / Quito 18 JUN 2014 – 21:40 CET

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

 

El pulso político y diplomático que encarna el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, permanece enquistado cuando se cumplen este jueves dos años de su entrada en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres, donde sigue refugiado bajo riesgo de ser arrestado si pone un pie fuera del recinto. Mientras el Gobierno ecuatoriano sostiene que el exhacker, que la fiscalía sueca quiere interrogar por posibles delitos sexuales, “no es un fugitivo” sino un asilado bajo su amparo, las autoridades británicas persisten en su empeño de detenerlo por haber violado los términos de la libertad condicional aquel 19 de junio de 2012, y mantienen un cerco policial en torno a la legación cuya factura ya roza los seis millones de libras.

 

En todas las entrevistas hechas a Assange, durante los dos años que lleva en el recinto diplomático, ha habido una pregunta constante. ¿Cómo es vivir en una embajada? Sus respuestas han permitido conocer que pasa los días confinado en una oficina de 20 metros cuadrados convertida en habitación. En ese espacio trabaja (jornadas de 17 horas frente a un ordenador), se ejercita (en una cinta para correr que le regaló el cineasta Ken Loach) y recibe visitas, según los reportes del periódico británico The Daily Mail en 2012. Por declaraciones de uno de sus abogados, Baltasar Garzón, se sabe que su mobiliario incluye una cama, una mesa, una estantería y ahí se acaba su mundo.

 

El propio australiano comparecerá en una rueda de prensa en conexión internauta este jueves con el ministro de Exteriores ecuatoriano, Ricardo Patiño, según este anunció su cuenta de Twitter sin precisar más detalles.


Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com.

NSA whistleblower’s victory, for exposing the scale of internet surveillance, follows that of Chelsea Manning last year
Edward Snowden

In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world’s foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian’s person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, cameMarco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144. Snowden’s victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning’s a year earlier.


La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El director de ‘The Guardian’, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes. / AP

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En Internet se pueden encontrar numerosas definiciones de maccarthysmo, o macartismo, una palabra derivada de la persecución lanzada entre 1950 y 1954 por el senador estadounidense Joe McCarthy contra supuestos comunistas y traidores a la patria, durante la guerra fría.

Olvídense de la palabra comunista, mantengan lo de traidores a la patria y piensen en lo que está ocurriendo en Reino Unido con el diarioThe Guardian por denunciar los abusos del espionaje estadounidense y británico, sino mundial, al publicar parte de los documentos que le hizo llegar el ex empleado subcontratado de la CIA Edward Snowden.

El macartismo se puede definir como “la práctica de publicitar acusaciones de deslealtad política o subversión sin atender debidamente a las pruebas”. O “el uso de métodos investigativos o acusatorios injustos con el objetivo de suprimir la oposición”. O “el uso de acusaciones sin base con cualquier objetivo”. O “el uso de acusaciones no corroboradas o técnicas investigadoras injustas en un intento por exponer deslealtad o subversión”. O “cualquier intento de restringir la crítica política o la discrepancia individual con la excusa de que es antipatriótico o pro-comunista”.

Cualquiera de ellas se puede aplicar a lo que le está pasando alGuardian, víctima de una campaña lanzada por los servicios secretos y jaleada por la prensa rival y por el primer ministro David Cameron personalmente, con el inestimable apoyo de diputados conservadores y también de algún laborista y de los medios rivales. El clímax, hasta ahora, de esa campaña se alcanzó el martes de esta semana con la comparecencia del director del periódico, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes.

“¿Ama usted este país?”, llegó a preguntar un diputado laborista al director de ‘The Guardian’

Esa comparecencia, en la que algunos diputados se comportaron con una fogosidad que se echó en falta cuando hace unos días los responsable de los servicios secretos comparecieron ante otra comisión parlamentaria, tuvo también su momento culminante. Fue cuando el presidente de la comisión, el incombustible diputado (más de un cuarto de siglo en la cámara) laborista Keith Vaz puso una mirada de perro degollado y con la más suave de las voces le preguntó a Rusbridger: “Parte de las críticas contra usted y The Guardian han sido muy, muy personales. Usted y yo hemos nacido fuera de este país, pero yo amo este país. ¿Ama usted este país?”. ¿Hay algo más macartista que insinuar que alguien hace algo políticamente significativo porque no es un patriota?


El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Sarah Harrison, la semana pasada, en Berlín. / GIAN PAUL LOZZA

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Hay una mujer que se ha quedado varada en Berlín. No quiere volver a su país de origen, Reino Unido, porque sus abogados le han dicho que corre el peligro de ser detenida. Se llama Sarah Harrison. Tiene 31 años. La mano derecha de Julian Assange en la plataforma de filtraciones WikiLeaks se convirtió el verano pasado en una tabla de salvación para Edward Snowden, el exanalista de la NSA que ha destapado el espionaje masivo que la agencia de inteligencia estadounidense ejerce a lo largo y ancho del planeta. Le solucionó la vida. O se la salvó.

Auxiliar al hombre más buscado por los servicios secretos de las superpotencias tiene un precio: no poder volver tranquilamente a casa.

La cita es en Berlín. Y nace envuelta en el misterio, como suele ser marca de la casa en la organización que comanda el editor australiano Julian Assange: cuestiones de seguridad. Hasta el último momento no se sabe dónde se realizará la entrevista. Pocos minutos antes de celebrarse, un mensaje da una indicación. Una esquina, un callejón, un viejo ascensor de mercancías y, por fin, un espacio diáfano del que no se pueden dar detalles. Sarah Harrison espera, risueña, con su chaqueta de cuero negra.

El currículum de esta británica no es poca cosa. En los últimos cuatro años ha estado en primera línea en dos de las filtraciones más importantes de la historia: los conocidos Papeles de Departamento de Estado, que exponían los tejemanejes de la política exterior estadounidense; y los Papeles de Snowden, que destapan el uso indiscriminado de programas como PRISMA para espiar las comunicaciones de toda persona fuera de territorio estadounidense, incluidos los teléfonos móviles de 35 líderes mundiales.


An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com

An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com.

Watergate scandal journalist’s letter comes as Guardian editor prepares to appear before MPs over Edward Snowden leaks

 

 

Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein, Watergate journalist and author, who has written a letter to the Guardian editor, Alan Rusbridger, who is to be questioned by MPs over the NSA revelations. Photograph: Teri Pengilley

 

Dear Alan,

There is plenty of time – and there are abundant venues – to debate relevant questions about Mr Snowden’s historical role, his legal fate, the morality of his actions, and the meaning of the information he has chosen to disclose.

But your appearance before the Commons today strikes me as something quite different in purpose and dangerously pernicious: an attempt by the highest UK authorities to shift the issue from government policies and excessive government secrecy in the United States and Great Britain to the conduct of the press – which has been quite admirable and responsible in the case of the Guardian, particularly, and the way it has handled information initially provided by Mr Snowden.


What now for the surveillance state? | World news | The Guardian

What now for the surveillance state? | World news | The Guardian.

Even GCHQ and the NSA know their work may not be sustainable without a proper debate about their power

 

Illustration of people on connected devices

GCHQ and the NSA potentially know everything about us, but we know virtually nothing about them. Illustration: Laurent Cilluffo

 

To most visitors, Cheltenham is a charming spa town on the edge of the Cotswolds. They admire its handsome regency terraces, visit its racecourse and throng to a thriving festival scene. Less visibly, Cheltenham is also a company town built around one industry: spying.

The Government Communications Headquarters seems to be very good at what it does. Its 6,400 employees include many bright computer engineers who work tirelessly to invent ever more imaginative ways to collect vast amounts of data on hundreds of millions of people.

Some find what they do reassuring, others menacing. As for the people who work at GCHQ, they have found themselves, for the first time, under intense scrutiny. This is, to put it mildly, unwelcome to them. They would like it to stop – and they have friends in politics, the law and even the press who agree.

According to those who study such things for a living, we live in a golden age of surveillance. The mobile phones we carry around betray us – our movements, our search terms, our health, our intentions, our friends, our emails, our texts. A bland name for it is “metadata“. But, as one former lawyer with the US National Security Agency told me: “Metadata absolutely tells you everything about somebody’s life.”

GCHQ is, along with the NSA, a world leader. Over the past five years GCHQ’s access to what they call “light” (a sweeter name for metadata) has increased by 7,000%, according to documents leaked by the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The amount of material being analysed or processed is up by 3,000%. That’s a lot of light.

Some accuse GCHQ of being little more than the Cheltenham branch office of the NSA. This may be unfair, but Whitehall officials concede that there is a high degree of co-operation and sharing between the two agencies. One of Cheltenham’s senior legal advisers put the possible attraction for their American counterparts this way: “We have a light oversight regime compared with the US.”

GCHQ, which receives tens of millions of pounds from the NSA every year, used, in some minds, to be the Cinderella of the intelligence world. The public imagination was more easily captured by James Bond, George Smiley and the cold war pitting of agent against agent.

It’s now clear that GCHQ and the NSA have risen without trace to the top of the intelligence pecking order. Increasingly an asymmetry has developed: they potentially know virtually everything about us, but we know virtually nothing about them.

This raises three questions. First, is it right that they are able to master all civil and commercial forms of communication in order to collect, store and analyse information about entire populations? Who knew?

Secondly, is it right that we should know so little about who they are or what they do – that this dramatic loss of individual privacy, unprecedented in history, could be done without any kind of public knowledge or consent? Who agreed?

Finally, is this new infrastructure sustainable?


NSA leaks: UK's enemies are 'rubbing their hands with glee', says MI6 chief | World news | theguardian.com

NSA leaks: UK’s enemies are ‘rubbing their hands with glee’, says MI6 chief | World news | theguardian.com.

Sir John Sawers makes claim in first ever joint public hearing by heads of UK’s three intelligence agencies

 

 

A screen grab from the UK's Parliamentar

Sir John Sawers, the head of MI6, speaks at the intelligence and security committee hearing. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

 

Britain’s three senior spy chiefs came into the public glare for the first time to claim that leaks by the former NSA analyst Edward Snowden were being “lapped up” by the country’s adversaries, but also to concede that the disclosures had prompted discussion with the government over how to be more transparent about their methods.

Lobban told MPs there had been a gradual but inexorable deterioration of GCHQ‘s knowledge of its targets after five months of near daily chat by potential terrorists about how to adapt their methods of communication in the light of the disclosures about GCHQ’s modus operandi. He asserted: “The cumulative effect of the media coverage, the global media coverage, will make the job that we have far, far harder for years to come.” Success, he in effect argued, required Britain’s enemies to be unaware or uncertain of GCHQ’s methods. He added: “There is a complex and fragile mosaic of strategic capability which allows us to discover, to process, to investigate and then to take action. That includes terrorist cells, it reveals people shipping secrets or expertise or materials to do with chemical, biological, nuclear around the world. It allows us to reveal the identities of those involved in online sexual exploitation of children. Those people are very active users of encryption and of anonymisation tools. That mosaic is in a far, far weaker place than it was five months ago.”

Neither Sawers nor Lobban was willing to give the committee any specific detail about the compromise of intelligence capability in public, but they promised to be “very, very specific” in a future private session.

Lobban also expressed fears that he was going to lose the co-operation of internet service providers in conducting telephone and internet monitoring. “I am concerned about the access that we can lawfully require of communications companies, which is very difficult if they are based overseas,” he said.

He hotly denied that GCHQ delved into “innocent emails and calls”, but said the agencies needed to have access to “the enormous hayfield” if they were to find the needles.


Edward Snowden: public indifference is the real enemy in the NSA affair | World news | The Observer

Edward Snowden: public indifference is the real enemy in the NSA affair | World news | The Observer.

Most people don’t seem to worry that government agencies are collecting their personal data. Is it ignorance or apathy?

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden’s revelations exposed a terrifying level of ‘passive acceptance’ of surveillance. Photograph: Sergei Grits/AP

One of the most disturbing aspects of the public response to Edward Snowden‘s revelations about the scale of governmental surveillance is how little public disquiet there appears to be about it. A recent YouGov poll, for example, asked respondents whether the British security services have too many or too few powers to carry out surveillance on ordinary people. Forty-two per cent said that they thought the balance was “about right” and a further 22% thought that the security services did not have enough powers. In another question, respondents were asked whether they thought Snowden’s revelations were a good or a bad thing; 43% thought they were bad and only 35% thought they were good.

Writing in these pages a few weeks ago, Henry Porter expressed his own frustration at this public complacency. “Today, apparently,” he wrote, “we are at ease with a system of near total intrusion that would have horrified every adult Briton 25 years ago. Back then, western spies acknowledged the importance of freedom by honouring the survivors of those networks; now, they spy on their own people. We have changed, that is obvious, and, to be honest, I wonder whether I, and others who care about privacy and freedom, have been left behind by societies that accept surveillance as a part of the sophisticated world we live in.”

I share Henry’s bafflement. At one point I thought that the level of public complacency about the revelations was a reflection simply of ignorance. After all, most people who use the internet and mobile phones have no idea about how any of this stuff works and so may be naive about the implications of state agencies being able to scoop up everybody’s email metadata, call logs, click streams, friendship networks and so on.

But what is, in a way, more alarming is how relaxed many of my professional peers seem to be about it. Many of them are people who do understand how the stuff works. To them, Snowden’s revelations probably just confirm what they had kind of suspected all along. And yet the discovery that in less than three decades our societies have achieved Orwellian levels of surveillance provokes, at most, a wry smile or a resigned shrug. And it is this level of passive acceptance that I find really scary.


Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com

Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com.

PM says leaks have damaged national security and suggests MPs could ‘examine issue and make further recommendations’

David Cameron

David Cameron speaks during prime minister’s questions, where he said: ‘The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security.’ Photograph: PA

David Cameron has encouraged a Commons select committee to investigate whether the Guardian has broken the law or damaged national security by publishing secrets leaked by the National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

He made his proposal in response to a question from former defence secretary Liam Fox, saying the Guardian had been guilty of double standards for exposing the scandal of phone hacking by newspapersand yet had gone on to publish secrets from the NSA taken by Snowden.

Speaking at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Cameron said: “The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security and in many ways the Guardian themselves admitted that when they agreed, when asked politely by my national security adviser and cabinet secretary to destroy the files they had, they went ahead and destroyed those files.


Coalition at odds over spying amid calls for better oversight | UK news | theguardian.com

Coalition at odds over spying amid calls for better oversight | UK news | theguardian.com.

No 10 dismisses Vince Cable claim that UK arguably lacks proper oversight of MI5, MI6 and GCHQ, as Clegg plans review

 

David Cameron and Vince Cable

A spokesman for David Cameron (left) said he was satisfied with the current oversight of spy agencies, which Vince Cable (right) had questioned. Photograph: Getty Images

 

Senior members of the coalition are at odds over Britain’s intelligence agencies after Downing Street dismissed a claim by Vince Cable that Britain arguably lacks a proper system of oversight.

As the business secretary praised the Guardian for performing a considerable public service in publishing leaked documents from the US National Security Agency, No 10 said David Cameron was satisfied with the current system of oversight. But the prime minister’s spokesman added that members of the national security council, of which Nick Clegg is a member, were entitled to question the intelligence agencies.

The spokesman said: “There is a debate that is outside of government that is often reported in [the Guardian] and other newspapers. There is the scope for members of the national security council, privy councillors, to ask questions and the like to better understand the work that the agencies do. That is always open to them.”

Downing Street moved to clarify Cameron’s thinking after Cable confirmed that Clegg was setting in train an examination of the oversight of Britain’s intelligence agencies.

The business secretary said the Guardian had made the “entirely correct and right” and courageous decision to publish details from secret NSA files leaked by the US whistleblower Edward Snowden. He said that arguably Britain did not have proper oversight of the domestic intelligence service MI5, its overseas agency MI6 and the eavesdropping centre GCHQ.


The Snowden files: why the British public should be worried about GCHQ | World news | The Guardian

The Snowden files: why the British public should be worried about GCHQ | World news | The Guardian.

When the Guardian offered John Lanchester access to the GCHQ files, the journalist and novelist was initially unconvinced. But what the papers told him was alarming: that Britain is sliding towards an entirely new kind of surveillance society

 

 

Lanchester reads Snowden files: digital lives illustration

Illustrations by Laurent Cilluffo. Animation by Alex Purcell

 

In August, the editor of the Guardian rang me up and asked if I would spend a week in New York, reading the GCHQ files whose UK copy the Guardian was forced to destroy. His suggestion was that it might be worthwhile to look at the material not from a perspective of making news but from that of a novelist with an interest in the way we live now.

I took Alan Rusbridger up on his invitation, after an initial reluctance that was based on two main reasons. The first of them was that I don’t share the instinctive sense felt by many on the left that it is always wrong for states to have secrets. I’d put it more strongly than that: democratic states need spies.


MI5 chief's condemnation of Snowden GCHQ leaks backed by David Cameron | UK news | theguardian.com

MI5 chief’s condemnation of Snowden GCHQ leaks backed by David Cameron | UK news | theguardian.com.

MI5 chief’s condemnation of Snowden GCHQ leaks backed by David Cameron

PM endorses spy chief but Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger warns that MI5 ‘cannot be only voice in this debate’

MI5 Director warns of exposure damage

Andrew Parker, the director general of MI5, said It causes enormous damage to make public the reach and limits of GCHQ techniques. Photograph: MI5/PA

David Cameron has endorsed a speech by Andrew Parker in which the new head of MI5 suggested that the leaks by the US whistleblower Edward Snowden had undermined the fight against terrorism.

The No 10 spokesman said: “The prime minister thinks it was an excellent speech and we are, as you would expect, always keeping under review the measures that are needed to contribute to keeping our country safe.”

Parker did not mention Snowden by name in a speech that strongly defended Britain’s intelligence agencies. But his remarks appeared to be aimed at the whistleblower who gave thousands of intelligence files to the Guardian that revealed surveillance programmes carried out by GCHQ and its US counterpart, the National Security Agency (NSA).

Alan Rusbridger, the editor-in-chief of the Guardian, mounted a strong defence of the newspaper’s reporting of files leaked by Snowden, which highlighted formidable technologies “beyond what Orwell could have imagined”.

Rusbridger told The World at One on Radio 4: “If you read the whole of Andrew Parker’s speech it is a perfectly reasonable speech and it is what you would expect him to say. If you are on the security side of the argument you want to keep everything secret, you don’t want a debate and you don’t want the press or anyone else writing about it. But MI5 cannot be the only voice in this debate.”


Open door: The readers' editor on… the Guardian's coverage of government surveillance | Comment is free | The Guardian

Open door: The readers’ editor on… the Guardian’s coverage of government surveillance | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Readers have raised concerns about these stories, based on tens of thousands of secret documents disclosed by Edward Snowden, but few are critical of the decision to publish

An entry in former Labour MP Chris Mullin’s diary for 6 August 1999 describes one of his first days as a new minister. Two men visited him in his office to talk about security. He was one of five ministers in the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions whose responsibilities, in his case water and aviation, entitled them to see “STRAP 2 (Top Secret)” information.

Mullin reports the details of his conversation with the two men, one of whom he dubbed the Undertaker. He writes: “The Undertaker said, ‘Some of the people we have to negotiate with are pretty uncivilised.’ He added, ‘Mind, we also deal with some very civilised people – and we spy on them, too.’ The only people we don’t spy on are the Americans, the New Zealanders, Australians and Canadians, who are all part of a little club that has agreed to share the products of their bugging, burglary and bribery.”

It’s now more than three months since the Guardian began publishing stories about the hidden extent of the US and UK governments’ surveillance of their peoples. These stories have been based on tens of thousands of secret documents disclosed by the National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. We now know, because of him, quite a lot more about the two senior members of the “little club” of five, which includes the UK and is known as the “Five Eyes”. These documents have revealed the scale and nature of the mass surveillance carried out through the NSA and the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).


Ex-MI6 deputy chief plays down damage caused by Snowden leaks | World news | The Guardian

Ex-MI6 deputy chief plays down damage caused by Snowden leaks | World news | The Guardian.

Nigel Inkster’s comments contrast with claims made by officials that disclosures have seriously damaged UK security

 

 

Edward Snowden

Inkster said the leaks by Edward Snowden (pictured) had probably not told those most interested in the activities of the NSA and GCHQ ‘very much they didn’t already know or could have inferred’. Photograph: AP

 

A former senior British secret intelligence officer on Thursday played down any potential damage done by the leaks to the Guardian of the spying activities of GCHQ and America’s National Security Agency, apparently contradicting claims made by UK security chiefs.

The leaks, by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden were “very embarrassing, uncomfortable, and unfortunate”, Nigel Inkster, former deputy chief of MI6, said.

While Inkster said it was too early to draw any definite conclusions about the impact of the leaks, he added:

“I sense that those most interested in the activities of the NSA and GCHQ have not been told very much they didn’t know already or could have inferred.”


NSA encryption story, Latin American fallout and US/UK attacks on press freedoms | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

NSA encryption story, Latin American fallout and US/UK attacks on press freedoms | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

I’m currently working on what I believe are several significant new NSAstories, to be published imminently here, as well as one very consequential story about NSA spying in Brazil that will first be broadcast Sunday night on the Brazilian television program Fantastico (because the report has worldwide implications, far beyond Brazil, it will be translated into English and then quickly published on the internet). Until then, I’m posting below the video of the 30-minute interview I did yesterday on Democracy Now with Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez about our NSA encryption story and ongoing US/UK attacks on press freedom (the transcript of that interview is here).

There has been some excellent commentary on the implications of the NSA/GCHQ encryption story we published this week. The LA Times’ Jim Healey says the story is “the most frightening” yet, and explains why he thinks that. The Bloomberg technology columnist David Meyer’s analysisof what this all means is worth reading in its entirety. In the Guardian, security expert Bruce Schneier, who has worked with us on a couple of soon-to-be-published stories, identifies 5 ways to maintain the privacy of your internet communications notwithstanding the efforts of the NSA and GCHQ to induce companies to build vulnerabilities into certain types of encryption.


Reporting the NSA spying revelations: Q&A with Guardian editors | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Reporting the NSA spying revelations: Q&A with Guardian editors | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger and Guardian US editor Janine Gibson answer questions about the NSA revelations at 10amET/3pmBST

 

 

 

NSA campus in Fort Meade, Maryland.
NSA campus in Fort Meade, Maryland. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

 

Revelations from documents Edward Snowden shared with the Guardian have fuelled debate about government surveillance activities in both the UK and US. Since June, hundreds of stories have been published by a team of reporters around the globe.

 

In order to address reader comments and questions about how the Guardian has reported these stories, Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger and Guardian US editor Janine Gibson will be answering reader questions within this live blog Monday 26 August from 10amET/3pmBST.

 

You can submit your questions ahead of time in the comments under this post or by using the hashtag #mynsaquestion on Twitter. Clarity is our main criteria in selecting quality questions with the time allotted.


“Fue un abuso para mandar un mensaje a mi compañero” | Internacional | EL PAÍS

“Fue un abuso para mandar un mensaje a mi compañero” | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El novio del periodista del ‘caso Snowden’ está en el punto de mira de los servicios de inteligencia británicos

Greenwald y Miranda, a la llegada de este último a Río de Janeiro. / RICARDO MORAES (REUTERS)

David Miranda, brasileño de 28 años y novio de Glenn Greenwald, el periodista estadounidense de The Guardian que destapó el caso de espionaje de Estados Unidos está en el punto de mira de los servicios de inteligencia británicos. Miranda volvía a Brasil desde Berlín después de reunirse con la cineasta Laura Poitras, colaboradora de Greenwald en la serie de reportajes basados en las filtraciones de Edward Snowden, el exagente de la NSA (Agencia Nacional de Seguridad, en sus siglas en inglés). Tras detenerlo durante casi once horas en el aeropuerto de Heathrow y requisarle todos sus aparatos electrónicos, Scotland Yard lanzó una investigación criminal contra él. Los datos encontrados en los dos lápices USB y el disco duro que Poitras le había dado podrían atentar “gravemente contra la seguridad nacional”, mantiene la policía.


Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

GCHQ

GCHQ’s headquarters on the outskirts of Cheltenham. Photograph: Barry Batchelor/PA

(Updated below)

The Independent this morning published an article – which it repeatedly claims comes from “documents obtained from the NSA by Edward Snowden” – disclosing that “Britain runs a secret internet-monitoring station in the Middle East to intercept and process vast quantities of emails, telephone calls and web traffic on behalf of Western intelligence agencies.” This is the first time the Independent has published any revelations purportedly from the NSA documents, and it’s the type of disclosure which journalists working directly with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have thus far avoided.

That leads to the obvious question: who is the source for this disclosure? Snowden this morning said he wants it to be clear that he was not the source for the Independent, stating:

I have never spoken with, worked with, or provided any journalistic materials to the Independent. The journalists I have worked with have, at my request, been judicious and careful in ensuring that the only things disclosed are what the public should know but that does not place any person in danger. People at all levels of society up to and including the President of the United States have recognized the contribution of these careful disclosures to a necessary public debate, and we are proud of this record.

“It appears that the UK government is now seeking to create an appearance that the Guardian and Washington Post’s disclosures are harmful, and they are doing so by intentionally leaking harmful information to The Independent and attributing it to others. The UK government should explain the reasoning behind this decision to disclose information that, were it released by a private citizen, they would argue is a criminal act.”


Exclusive: UK’s secret Mid-East internet surveillance base is revealed in Edward Snowden leaks – UK Politics – UK – The Independent

Exclusive: UK’s secret Mid-East internet surveillance base is revealed in Edward Snowden leaks – UK Politics – UK – The Independent.

 

 

Related articles

Britain runs a secret internet-monitoring station in the Middle East to intercept and process vast quantities of emails, telephone calls and web traffic on behalf of Western intelligence agencies, The Independent has learnt.

The station is able to tap into and extract data from the underwater fibre-optic cables passing through the region.

The information is then processed for intelligence and passed to GCHQ in Cheltenham and shared with the National Security Agency (NSA) in the United States. The Government claims the station is a key element in the West’s “war on terror” and provides a vital “early warning” system for potential attacks around the world.

The Independent is not revealing the precise location of the station but information on its activities was contained in the leaked documents obtained from the NSA by Edward Snowden. The Guardian newspaper’s reporting on these documents in recent months has sparked a dispute with the Government, with GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives containing the data.


David Miranda wins partial court victory over data seized by police | World news | theguardian.com

David Miranda wins partial court victory over data seized by police | World news | theguardian.com.

David Miranda and Glenn Greenwald

David Miranda (left) and Glenn Greenwald. Miranda won a partial high court victory to stop the government and police ‘inspecting, copying or sharing’ data seized from him during his detention at Heathrow airport. Photograph: Channel 4 News

David Miranda has been granted a limited injunction at the high court to stop the government and police “inspecting, copying or sharing” data seized from him during his detention at Heathrow airport – but examination by the police for national security purposes is allowed.

Miranda had taken the government to court to try and get the data returned, but judges ruled that the police would be able to make limited use of what had been taken during his nine-hour detention on Sunday. He is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian reporter who has exposed mass digital surveillance by US and UK spy agencies.

The court ruled the authorities must not inspect the data nor distribute it domestically or to any foreign government or agency unless it is for the purpose of ensuring the protection national security or for investigating whether Miranda is himself involved in the commission, instigation or preparation of an act of terrorism.

But the ruling also meant that data cannot be used for the purposes of criminal investigation – although the court had previously heard that the Met had launched a criminal investigation after analysing the seized data.

Detectives have been trawling through the documents that they say Miranda was carrying as he changed planes in London on his way back to Rio de Janeiro, where he lives with Greenwald..

Jonathan Laidlaw QC, appearing for the Metropolitan police, said the data contains “highly sensitive material the disclosure of which would be gravely injurious to public safety”. There were “tens of thousands” of pages of digital material, he added.


EEUU se distancia de la actuación de Inglaterra contra “Guardian” – El Mostrador

EEUU se distancia de la actuación de Inglaterra contra “Guardian” – El Mostrador.

“Es muy difícil imaginarse un escenario en el que fuera (un comportamiento) adecuado”, señaló el portavoz de la Casa Blanca, Josh Earnest.

Estados Unidos se distanció públicamente de la actuación del gobierno británico contra el diario “The Guardian”, en el marco de las presiones denunciadas por el rotativo para entregar o devolver los documentos filtrados por el ex informante de los servicios secretos estadouniense Edward Snowden.

“Es muy difícil imaginarse un escenario en el que fuera (un comportamiento) adecuado”, dijo en la noche del martes el portavoz de la Casa Blanca, Josh Earnest, al ser preguntado sobre la corrección de que funcionarios del gobierno entren en una empresa mediática para destruir discos duros.


Londres confirma que Cameron sabía de antemano que Miranda iba a ser detenido | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Londres confirma que Cameron sabía de antemano que Miranda iba a ser detenido | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

VÍDEO: REUTERS – LIVE! / FOTO: EFE

 

El primer ministro David Cameron sabía de antemano que David Miranda, el novio del periodista del The Guardian que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’, Glenn Greenwald, iba a ser detenido en el londinense aeropuerto de Heathrow, según una información publicada por el diario británico y confirmada por Londres. La nota del Gobierno británico ha llegado momentos después de que la Casa Blanca haya afirmado que recibió “un toque” por parte de Downing Street informando que Miranda iba a hacer escala en Heathrow en su viaje de Alemania a Brasil. Los abogados del novio de Greenwald han iniciado un proceso judicial contra la policía británica por su detención “ilegal” en el londinense aeropuerto de Heathrow durante nueve horas, según ha informado Alan Rusbridger, editor del diario británico. “David Miranda demanda como le ha sido confiscado todo su material durante los interrogatorios en el aeropuerto y por cómo le han tratado los agentes de seguridad”, aseguraba el editor en una entrevista a la BBC.


Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video | World news | theguardian.com

Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video

Beta

The Guardian’s editor reveals why and how the newspaper destroyed computer hard drives containing copies of some of the secret files leaked by Edward Snowden. The decision was taken after a threat of legal action by the British government, that could have stopped the reporting on the extent of American and British state surveillance revealed by the document

via Alan Rusbridger: I would rather destroy the copied files than hand them back to the NSA and GCHQ – video | World news | theguardian.com.


Rusbridger: destroying hard drives allowed us to continue NSA coverage | Media | theguardian.com

Rusbridger: destroying hard drives allowed us to continue NSA coverage | Media | theguardian.com.

Guardian editor-in-chief says he agreed to ‘slightly pointless’ task because newspaper has digital copies outside Britain

 

 

Alan Rusbridger

Alan Rusbridger: ‘Given that there were other copies, I saw no reason not to destroy this material ourselves.’ Photograph: /BBC News

 

Alan Rusbridger, the Guardian editor-in-chief, has said that the destruction of computer hard drives containing information provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden allowed the paper to continue reporting on the revelations instead of surrendering the material to UK courts.

Rusbridger told BBC Radio 4’s The World at One on Tuesday that he agreed to the “slightly pointless” task of destroying the devices – which was overseen by two GCHQ officials at the Guardian’s headquarters in London – because the newspaper is in possession of digital copies outside Britain.


Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

The detention of my partner, David Miranda, by UK authorities will have the opposite effect of the one intended

Glenn Greenwald
theguardian.com, Sunday 18 August 2013 19.44 BST

At 6:30 am this morning my time – 5:30 am on the East Coast of the US – I received a telephone call from someone who identified himself as a “security official at Heathrow airport.” He told me that my partner, David Miranda, had been “detained” at the London airport “under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act of 2000.”

David had spent the last week in Berlin, where he stayed with Laura Poitras, the US filmmaker who has worked with me extensively on the NSA stories. A Brazilian citizen, he was returning to our home in Rio de Janeiro this morning on British Airways, flying first to London and then on to Rio. When he arrived in London this morning, he was detained.


Londres retiene nueve horas al novio del periodista que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Londres retiene nueve horas al novio del periodista que destapó el ‘caso Snowden’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

El compañero del periodista de The Guardian que escribió una serie de reportajes que revelaron los programas de espionaje masivo de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad estadounidense (NSA, en sus siglas inglesas) fue retenido este domingo en el aeropuerto de Heathrow durante casi nueve horas por las autoridades británicas cuando se disponía a viajar a Río de Janeiro.

David Miranda, que vive con el periodista Glenn Greenwald, regresaba de un viaje a Berlín cuando fue detenido por funcionarios e informado de que debía ser interrogado bajo el artículo 7 de la ley antiterrorista de 2000. La controvertida norma, que se aplica solo en aeropuertos, puertos y zonas fronterizas, permite a los funcionarios retener, interrogar y detener a individuos.

Miranda, de 28 años, fue retenido durante nueve horas, el máximo que permite la ley antes de que el individuo sea liberado o bien detenido formalmente. Según datos oficiales, la mayoría de las inquisitorias realizadas bajo el artículo 7 (el 97%) duraron menos de una hora, y solo una entre 2.000 personas investigadas fue retenida más de seis horas.

Miranda fue dejado en libertad sin cargos, pero los funcionarios confiscaron los dispositivos electrónicos que llevaba, incluidos su teléfono móvil, ordenador, cámara, memorias, DVD y juegos de consola.