Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The debate about “fake news” and the “post-truth” society we now supposedly inhabit has become the epistemological version of a feeding frenzy: so much heat, so little light. Two things about it are particularly infuriating. The first is the implicit assumption that “truth” is somehow a straightforward thing and our problem is that we just can’t be bothered any more to find it. The second is the failure to appreciate that the profitability, if not the entire business model, of both Google and Facebook depends critically on them not taking responsibility for what passes through their servers. So hoping that these companies will somehow fix the problem is like persuading turkeys to look forward to Christmas.

Fuente: Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Edward Snowden’s New Research Aims to Keep Smartphones From Betraying Their Owners

National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden has been working with prominent hardware hacker Andrew “Bunnie” Huang to solve this problem. The pair are developing a way for potentially imperiled smartphone users to monitor whether their devices are making any potentially compromising radio transmissions. They argue that a smartphone’s user interface can’t be relied on to tell you the truth about that state of its radios. Their initial prototyping work uses an iPhone 6.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s New Research Aims to Keep Smartphones From Betraying Their Owners


La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador

En la economía de Internet, Asia suele ser la precursora de nuevos servicios tales como aplicaciones de mensajería o pagos móviles. Ahora ha avanzado con una nueva tendencia: más gente que en otras partes del mundo ha instalado en sus teléfonos móviles software para bloquear la publicidad de internet.

Fuente: La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador


Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can't Guess – The Intercept

Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can’t Guess – The Intercept.

Featured photo - Passphrases That You Can Memorize — But That Even the NSA Can’t Guess

It’s getting easier to secure your digital privacy. iPhones now encrypt agreat deal of personal information; hard drives on Mac and Windows 8.1computers are now automatically locked down; even Facebook, which made a fortune on open sharing, is providing end-to-end encryption in the chat tool WhatsApp. But none of this technology offers as much protection as you may think if you don’t know how to come up with a good passphrase.

A passphrase is like a password, but longer and more secure. In essence, it’s an encryption key that you memorize. Once you start caring more deeply about your privacy and improving your computer security habits, one of the first roadblocks you’ll run into is having to create a passphrase. You can’t secure much without one.

For example, when you encrypt your hard drive, a USB stick, or a document on your computer, the disk encryption is often only as strong as your passphrase. If you use a password database, or the password-saving feature in your web browser, you’ll want to set a strong master passphrase to protect them. If you want to encrypt your email with PGP, you protect your private key with a passphrase. In his first email to Laura Poitras, Edward Snowden wrote, “Please confirm that no one has ever had a copy of your private key and that it uses a strong passphrase. Assume your adversary is capable of one trillion guesses per second.”

In this post, I outline a simple way to come up with easy-to-memorize but very secure passphrases. It’s the latest entry in an ongoing series of stories offering solutions — partial and imperfect but useful solutions — to the many surveillance-related problems we aggressively report about here atThe Intercept.

It turns out, coming up with a good passphrase by just thinking of one is incredibly hard, and if your adversary really is capable of one trillion guesses per second, you’ll probably do a bad job of it. If you use an entirely random sequence of characters it might be very secure, but it’s also agonizing to memorize (and honestly, a waste of brain power).

But luckily this usability/security trade-off doesn’t have to exist. There is a method for generating passphrases that are both impossible for even the most powerful attackers to guess, yet very possible for humans to memorize. The method is called Diceware, and it’s based on some simple math.


How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept

How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How to Leak to The Intercept

People often tell reporters things their employers, or their government, want to keep suppressed. But leaking can serve the public interest, fueling revelatory and important journalism.

This publication was created in part as a platform for journalism arising from unauthorized disclosures by NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Our founders and editors are strongly committed to publishing stories based on leaked material when that material is newsworthy and serves the public interest. So ever since The Intercept launched, our staff has tried to put the best technology in place to protect our sources. Our website has been protected with HTTPS encryption from the beginning. All of our journalists publish their PGP keys on their staff profiles so that readers can send them encrypted email. And we’ve been running a SecureDrop server, an open source whistleblower submission system, to make it simpler and more secure for anonymous sources to get in touch with us.

But caution is still advised to those who want to communicate with us without exposing their real-world identities.


La agencia Associated Press sustituirá periodistas por robots | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

La agencia Associated Press sustituirá periodistas por robots | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

Las máquinas se encargarán de noticias automáticas como ofrecer los resultados de las empresas

 

Washington 3 JUL 2014 – 10:59 CEST

 

Un panel electrónico con las cotizaciones de Wall Street. / YUYA SHINO (REUTERS)

La agencia de noticias Associated Press (AP) anunció que este mismo mes automatizará la mayoría de las historias que produce sobre los resultados trimestrales de las empresas, que dejarán
de escribir reporteros y generarán máquinas.

El vicepresidente y director gerente de AP, Lou Ferrara, indicó en un comunicado en la página web de la compañía que la decisión dejará más tiempo libre a los periodistas para cultivar sus fuentes y cubrir temas en profundidad, al tiempo que multiplicará por más de diez el volumen
de información sobre resultados corporativos. “Como todas las compañías de medios, AP está revisando constantemente qué contenido necesita ofrecer a sus clientes y cuál es el mejor uso de sus reporteros”, afirmó Ferrara.

El directivo de la mayor agencia de noticias estadounidense destacó que “durante muchos años” los periodistas de AP han dedicado una gran cantidad de tiempo a generar información sobre los resultados de las empresas, con un volumen que ronda las 300 notas por trimestre.

Pero AP descubrió recientemente, según relató Ferrara, que tecnología de la empresa Automated Insights combinada con datos de la firma Zacks Investment Research permiten generar historias cortas, de entre 150 y 300 palabras, automáticamente en aproximadamente el mismo tiempo que necesitan los periodistas.

“Y en lugar de generar 300 historias manualmente, podemos ofrecer alrededor de 4.400 automáticamente” cada trimestre, dijo el vicepresidente de AP, quien cree que la automatización será parte de muchas industrias, incluida la de medios de comunicación.


No, Apple hasn't said it will share an iPhone 5s 'fingerprint database' with the NSA | Technology | theguardian.com

No, Apple hasn’t said it will share an iPhone 5s ‘fingerprint database’ with the NSA | Technology | theguardian.com.

Just because a right-wing ‘satire’ site writes something about the iPhone 5s, that doesn’t make it true: and the characters in quotes saying Apple will share data are made up

 

 

John Lennon fingerprint card

The FBI already keeps a fingerprint database; these were John Lennon’s on his application for permanent US residence. Photograph: Henry S Dziekan III/Getty Images

 

The latest “oh, this must be true because we read it somewhere” is that “Apple is going to share its fingerprint database collected by the iPhone 5s with the National Security Agency”. Reality check: the article claiming this comes from a right-wing “satire” site. Why are people confused? Because the satire’s badly executed.

A lot of people read it but didn’t realise that the satire site was a satire site. (I’ve had at least one email pointing excitedly to it, and not ironically.) This isn’t surprising, because the thing about satire is that you either have to lay it on with a trowel, or get so close to the bone (eg The Thick Of It) that it’s indistinguishable from painful reality. It’s easy to do badly. And the site in question, National Report, does it really badly. It’s like Fox News, but with the jokes and facts taken out.

Even so, you’d hope people who read such “stories” might think a bit. Or that they might even look at other headlines on the site, and wonder if a site which has a story headlined “Apple iPhone 5s Fingerprint Data To Be Shared With NSA” but also has one headlined “Packers Embarrassing Loss to Bengals Linked To Green Bay Bridge Collapse” and “Taurus Firearms Company Introduces The New Trayvon PK-10 or ‘Perp-Killer’” is entirely serious. (It isn’t actually funny, especially the latter headline; if you’re easily offended, don’t read the story that goes with it. But that’s another matter.)

Let’s recap what we do know about the iPhone 5s‘s fingerprint system.