The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian

Chelsea Manning, the army private who released a vast trove of US state secrets and was punished by the US military for months in penal conditions denounced by the UN as torture, has been released from a military prison in Kansas after serving seven years of a 35-year sentence.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning released from military prison | US news | The Guardian


Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks founder qualifies his pledge to accept extradition to the US in interview with Australian current affairs programme The Project

Fuente: Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks tweeted last week that Assange would agree to US extradition if Obama granted Manning clemency. Asked during a web broadcast on Thursday if he would now leave the embassy, Assange said: “I stand by everything I said, including the offer to go to the United States if Chelsea Manning’s sentence was commuted.”

Fuente: Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

At the time of her revelations, she was the most important whistleblower since Daniel Ellsberg. Upon hearing the news today, Ellsberg said this: “Once in a while, someone does what they ought to do. Some go to prison for it, for seven years; some accept exile for life. But sometimes even a president does it. And today, it was Obama.”

Fuente: Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian

A lawyer for Julian Assange has indicated that the WikiLeaks founder is ready to face extradition to the US after Barack Obama commuted the sentence of US army whistleblower Chelsea Manning.

Fuente: Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian

The White House insisted on Tuesday that Assange’s offer to submit to extradition if Obama “grants Manning clemency” did not influence the president’s action.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian


Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks

El presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama, conmutó la pena de prisión a quien fuera fuente de Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning.Según la información de la Casa Blanca, la exsoldado será liberada el próximo 17 de mayo, aunque se encontraba condenada a una pena de cárcel de 35 años.

Fuente: Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks


Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian

Now the most audacious display of support for Snowden is under way. Messages calling for his pardon are being beamed on to the outside wall of the Newseum, the Washington institution devoted to freedom of speech and the press that stands less than two miles from the White House.

Fuente: Edward Snowden backers beam calls for pardon on Washington news museum | US news | The Guardian


US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian

The journalist John Pilger, a close ally and frequent visitor of Assange in the embassy, told the Guardian that Assange “will have a contingency”, and stressed that WikiLeaks was bigger than its founder.“I can’t imagine that the restrictions will stop the leaks or deter WikiLeaks and Assange,” he said. “The significance of the action by Ecuador, which is clearly under pressure, is to show how frightened the US establishment is of further revelations reaching the public about its preferred presidential candidate.”

Fuente: US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian


Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election

The government of Ecuador confirmed on Tuesday that it had decided “to temporarily restrict access” to the internet inside its embassy in London, effectively cutting off Julian Assange, the editor of Wikileaks, who has lived there since he was granted political asylum in 2012.Assange first reported on Monday that his internet connection had been “severed by a state party,” and the organization was forced to resort to a back-up plan to continue its work.

Fuente: Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election


Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador

El secretario de Estado de EE.UU., John Kerry, pidió a ese país que evitara que el fundador de WikiLeaks divulgara información clasificada de la candidata demócrata a la Casa Blanca, sobre las negociaciones de paz entre el Gobierno colombiano y las FARC.

Fuente: Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


“El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”

“La gestión de los Papeles de Panamá es un ataque a nuestro modelo”, asegura el fundador de Wikileaks, muy crítico con el Consorcio Internacional de Periodistas de Investigación que ha publicado esta última gran filtración”Los medios establecidos tienen que limitarse constantemente bajo los poderes del establishment, los poderes del Estado al que pertenecen”, dice Assange en esta entrevista con eldiario.es en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres

Fuente: “El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”


Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian

A former Pentagon investigator has spoken on record to the Guardian about major privacy and security lapses within the government’s whistleblower program. John Crane, who for 25 years worked for the Department of Defense inspector general’s office, which helps federal employees expose abuse and corruption, says whistleblowers like Edward Snowden had little choice but to go outside the system. His revelations can now be made public for the first time

Fuente: Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian


Fundación Karisma | Misoginia en internet: bombardeo a campo abierto contra las periodistas

No cabe duda que internet ha potenciado la libertad de expresión. Tampoco es equivocado señalar que las mismas dinámicas que emergen también están excluyendo e impidiendo el ejercicio de este derecho. Y hay quienes lo sufren más que otras personas, por ejemplo, mujeres, personas de la comunidad LGTTTBI o minorías étnicas. ¿No les llama la atención que sean los mismos grupos de persona que sufren continuamente discriminación y violencia? Pues sí, internet no es muy diferente del mundo analógico ni es la pana

Fuente: Fundación Karisma | Misoginia en internet: bombardeo a campo abierto contra las periodistas


Edward Snowden's message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s message to Guardian readers – video | Membership | The Guardian.

Guardian defence and intelligence correspondent Ewen MacAskill reads out a message to Guardian readers at a Members’ screening of Citizenfour in London. MacAskill joined editor-in-chief Alan Rusbriger, Janine Gibson and Stuart Millar to discuss the Snowden story in Kings Place on 2 March 2015.


The "Snowden is Ready to Come Home!" Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept

The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept.

Featured photo - The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit

Most sentient people rationally accept that the U.S. media routinely disseminates misleading stories and outright falsehoods in the most authoritative tones. But it’s nonetheless valuable to examine particularly egregious case studies to see how that works. In that spirit, let’s take yesterday’s numerous, breathless reports trumpeting the “BREAKING” news that “Edward Snowden now wants to come home!” and is “now negotiating the terms of his return!”

Ever since Snowden revealed himself to the public 20 months ago, he has repeatedly said the same exact thing when asked about his returning to the U.S.: I would love to come home, and would do so if I could get a fair trial, but right now, I can’t.

His primary rationale for this argument has long been that under the Espionage Act, the 1917 statute under which he has been charged, he would be barred by U.S. courts from even raising his key defense: that the information he revealed to journalists should never have been concealed in the first place and he was thus justified in disclosing it to journalists. In other words, when U.S. political and media figures say Snowden should “man up,” come home and argue to a court that he did nothing wrong, they are deceiving the public, since they have made certain that whistleblowers charged with “espionage” are legally barred from even raising that defense.


Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing

Barrett Brown’s sentence is unjust, but it may become the norm for journalists – Boing Boing.

A journalist was jailed after sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

By Trevor Timm

Investigative journalist Barrett Brown was sentenced to an obscene 63 months in prison on Thursday, in part for sharing a hyperlink to a stolen document that he did not steal, and despite the fact that he was not guilty of a crime for linking to it.

 

Maybe journalists think this is an anomaly, and some will ignore his case entirely since Brown also pled guilty to other charges that led to part of his sentence too. But be warned: if the White House passes its dramatic expansion of US computer law, journalists will constantly be under similar threat and reporting on hacked documents could become a crime.

How is this possible, you ask? Well, first it’s important to understand the details of Brown’s case.


Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing

Journalist Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months in federal prison – Boing Boing.

He’s already served more than two years in prison on charges related to sources within the Anonymous hacktivist entity.

By Xeni Jardin

A court in Dallas has sentenced Barrett Brown to 63 months in federal prison, minus 28 months already served. For count one in the case, he receives 48 months. For count 2, he receives 12 months. And for count 3, he receives 3 months. He is also ordered to pay $890,000 in restitution.

The government’s charges against the intelligence and security reporter stemmed from his relationship with sources close to the hacker group Anonymous, and the fact that Brown published a link to publicly-available copies of leaked Stratfor documents.

Brown read a statement to the court during the sentencing hearing, and you can read that statement in entirety here.

“Journalists are especially vulnerable right now, Your Honor, and they become more so when the FBI feels comfortable making false claims about them,” Brown wrote:

 

Deny being a spokesperson for Anonymous hundreds of times, and you’re still a spokesperson for Anonymous. Deny being a journalist once or twice, and you’re not a journalist. What conclusion can one draw from this sort of reasoning other than that you are whatever the FBI finds it convenient for you to be at any given moment. This is not the “rule of law”, Your Honor, it is the “rule of law enforcement”, and it is very dangerous.


Saudi blogger receives first 50 lashes of sentence for 'insulting Islam' | World news | The Guardian

Saudi blogger receives first 50 lashes of sentence for ‘insulting Islam’ | World news | The Guardian.

Raif Badawi has been given 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes to be carried out over 20 weeks

  • The Guardian
Raif Badawi with his children in a picture supplied to Amnesty.
Raif Badawi with his children in a picture supplied to Amnesty. Photograph: Amnesty

A Saudi blogger convicted of insulting Islam was brought after Friday prayers to a public square in the port city of Jeddah and flogged 50 times before hundreds of spectators, a witness to the lashing said.

The witness said Raif Badawi’s feet and hands were shackled during the flogging but his face was visible. He remained silent and did not cry out, said the witness, who spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity fearing government reprisal.

Badawi was sentenced last May to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes. He had criticized Saudi Arabia’s powerful clerics on a liberal blog he founded. The blog has since been shut down. He was also ordered to pay a fine of 1m riyals or about $266,600.


Mil latigazos para silenciar la crítica | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Mil latigazos para silenciar la crítica | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Las monarquías de la península Arábiga recurren a leyes antiterroristas para encarcelar a los activistas

Raef Badawi, el bloguero saudí preso desde 2012 por insultar al islam, con sus tres hijos. / ENSAF HAIDAR (BLOOMBERG)

Ensaf Haidar tiembla ante la mera perspectiva de los 1.000 latigazos que aguardan a su marido, Raef Badawi, condenado en Arabia Saudí por “faltar al respeto al islam”. Su delito fue defender la libertad de expresión y haber fundado un portal en Internet donde se podía debatir sobre religión. El brutal castigo, que se ejecutará en tandas de 50 azotes propinados en sucesivos viernes y que se suma a 10 años de privación de libertad, busca disuadir a otros activistas de los derechos civiles en el Reino del Desierto. Como en el resto de las monarquías de la península Arábiga, el temor a que la mínima apertura socave su poder absoluto se ha exacerbado desde la primavera árabe.

“En otros países se denuncia la reducción del espacio para la sociedad civil, en esta parte del mundo no hay espacio que reducir”, lamenta Khalid Ibrahim, codirector del Gulf Center for Human Rights (GCHR). “Los defensores de derechos humanos son tratados como criminales, les resulta imposible encontrar un trabajo y no se les permite organizarse. De Omán, donde detienen a un activista y no sabemos dónde está, a Arabia Saudí, donde encarcelan a cualquiera que discrepa, pasando por Emiratos, que no tolera la crítica, y Bahréin, donde siguen las protestas; la situación es muy mala”, resume durante una conversación telefónica.

“Raef no es un criminal. No es un asesino o un violador. Es un bloguero. Su único delito es ser una voz libre en un país que no tolera ni entiende la libertad”, repite una y otra vez la citada Haidar quien, tras la detención de su esposo en 2012 se exilió con sus tres hijos en Canadá.


Jacob Appelbaum: "La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social"

Jacob Appelbaum: “La criptografía es una cuestión de justicia social”.

Appelbaum, una de las caras visibles del proyecto TOR, reclama que la sociedad sea consciente de que debe protegerse de los abusos del Estado con tecnología y nuevas leyes

“Están intentando asustar a la sociedad y decir a la ciudadanía que el uso de estas herramientas es terrorífico, pero lo que no nos cuentan es cómo ellos utilizan los sistemas de vigilancia para matar gente”

“Con las revelaciones de Snowden simplemente hemos pasado de la teoría a la certeza”

 

 

Jacob Appelbaum | Foto: COP:DOX  http://cphdox.dk/sites/default/files/styles/title-top/public/title/24276.jpg?itok=tGB_VZdM

Jacob Appelbaum, investigador, hacker y miembro de Proyecto Tor | Foto: CPH:DOX

 

 

Cryptoparties hay muchas. Cientos de ellas se celebran cada hora en cualquier parte del mundo, en un café, en la parte trasera de una tienda o incluso off the radar si se trata de compartir conocimientos con activistas o periodistas que trabajan en condiciones de riesgo. Las hay que ya han pasado a la historia como la organizada en 2011 via Twitter por la activista austaliana Asher Wolf, considerada la chispa de lo que en apenas semanas pasó a convertirse en un movimiento social a escala global, o la promovida por un –entonces aún desconocido—  Edward Snowden en un hacklab de Hawái cuando aún trabajaba para la NSA, y apenas un mes antes de contactar con Laura Poitras para revelarle el mayor escándalo de espionaje masivo conocido hasta el momento.

Sin embargo, una cryptoparty que reúna en una misma sala, precisamente, a la confidente de Snowden y directora del documental Citizenfour, Poitras; al activista, experto en seguridad informática y desarrollador de TOR, Jacob Appelbaum; y a William Binney –exoficial de inteligencia de la NSA convertido en whistleblower más de una década antes de que Snowden lo hiciera— solo hay una: la celebrada la semana pasada en el Bremen Theater de Copenhague con motivo del estreno del documental de Poitras en el festival internacional de cine documental CPH: DOX.

“Hace diez años nadie hubiera pensado en organizar un evento para hablar de esto, hubieran pensado que estábamos locos” comenta Jacob Appelbaum, uno de los gurús de la criptografía, miembro del equipo desarrollador de TOR y activista implacable en la lucha contra los sistemas de vigilancia masivos empleados por los gobiernos de distintos países. Eso demuestra que algo ha cambiado. Y lo dice la persona que precisamente inició en esto de la criptografía a la mismísima Poitras, cuyos conocimientos (y trayectoria cinematográfica, que incluía un corto documental sobre William Binney) fueron determinantes cuando Snowden eligió a quién revelaría su preciado secreto, aunque como el propio Citizenfour prefiere plantearlo, ella misma se eligió.

“Había empezado a utilizar criptografía cuando comencé a comunicarme con Jake”, contó Poitras. “Estaba muy interesada en su trabajo entrenando a activistas alrededor del mundo en cómo sortear los sistemas de vigilancia. Así que tuve que cargarme las pilas, me bajé algunas herramientas, en concreto usaba dos: PGP Email y chat OTR”, las mismas herramientas que Snowden enseñó a instalar a Glenn Greenwald para poder comunicarse de forma segura.

“Recuerdo que mandé un email a Jake explicándole quién era y el documental en el que estaba trabajando. Enseguida me contestó y me dijo que teníamos verificar las fingerprints, yo no tenía ni idea de lo que estaba hablando, así que me hice la entendida, le pedí unos minutos para ganar tiempo y me puse a buscar online de qué iba eso de las fingerprints“. “La verdad es que fue muy buen profesor y luego me enseñó muchas más cosas, que luego aparentemente fueron bastante oportunas cuando en enero de 2013 recibí el primer email de un tal Citizenfour pidiéndome mi clave pública”.


Snowden: Internet no es el enemigo al igual que no lo es Irak | SurySur

Snowden: Internet no es el enemigo al igual que no lo es Irak | SurySur.

eeuu edward snowden

Pocos tienen el privilegio de entrevistar a Edward Snowden, aún por videoconferencia, después de que destapara, por medio de filtraciones a los periodistas, uno de los mayores escándalos, o el que más, de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional estadounidense (NSA por sus siglas en inglés).

TED Talks lo ha conseguido. El programa de Tecnología, Entretenimiento y Diseño con más de 900 charlas (que se pueden descargar gratuitamente), traducidas a 80 idiomas y, hasta 2011, visitadas por más de 400 millones de veces, lo ha entrevistado en una curiosa videoconferencia. Al parecer, el programa estadounidense ha creído que las de Snowden sí eran “Ideas dignas de difundir” (el lema del espacio televisivo), al contrario de lo que pueda pensar su país.


Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept

Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept.

By 246
Featured photo - Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read?DEAUVILLE, FRANCE – MAY 26: (L-R) Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Union, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook Inc. and Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc. arrive for the internet session of the G8 summit on May 26, 2011 in Deauville, France. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe – Pool/Getty Images)

There have been increasingly vocal calls for Twitter, Facebook and other Silicon Valley corporations to more aggressively police what their users are permitted to see and read. Last month in The Washington Post, for instance, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow demanded that social media companies ban the accounts of “terrorists” who issue “direct calls” for violence.

This week, the announcement by Twitter CEO Dick Costolo that the company would prohibit the posting of the James Foley beheading video and photos from it (and suspend the accounts of anyone who links to the video) met with overwhelming approval. What made that so significant, as The Guardian‘s James Ball noted today, was that “Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception.” By contrast, Facebook has long actively regulated what its users are permitted to say and read; at the end of 2013, the company reversed its prior ruling and decided that posting of beheading videos would be allowed, but only if the user did not express support for the act.

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

It’s tempting to support criminalization of, say, racist views as long as one focuses on one’s contempt for those views and ignores the serious dangers of vesting the state with the general power to create lists of prohibited ideas. That’s why free speech defenders such as the ACLU so often represent and defend racists and others with heinous views in free speech cases: because that’s where free speech erosions become legitimized in the first instance when endorsed or acquiesced to.

The question posed by Twitter’s announcement is not whether you think it’s a good idea for people to see the Foley video. Instead, the relevant question is whether you want Twitter, Facebook and Google executives exercising vast power over what can be seen and read.

It’s certainly true, as defenders of Twitter have already pointed out, that as a legal matter, private actors – as opposed to governments – always possess and frequently exercise the right to decide which opinions can be aired using their property. Generally speaking, the public/private dichotomy is central to any discussions of the legality or constitutionality of “censorship.”


Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com

Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com.

By acting on footage of James Foley’s murder, Twitter has taken responsibility in a way it hasn’t over abuse and threats. So what happens next?
Man's hands at computer

Twitter was once characterised by its general counsel as ‘the free speech wing of the free speech party’. Photograph: Alamy

Twitter has got itself into a tangle. The social network’s decision to remove all links to the horrific footage showing the apparent beheading of the photojournalist James Foley is one that most of its users, reasonably, support.

The social network went still further, suspending or banning users who shared the footage or certain stills, following public tweets from the company’s CEO, Dick Costolo, that it would take action against such users.

It is hard to think of anyone having a good reason to view or share such barbaric footage, but Twitter’s proactive approach reverses a long record of non-intervention.

Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception. The company’s former general counsel once characterised the company as “the free speech wing of the free speech party”, an approach characterised by removing content only in extreme situations – when made to by governments in accordance with local law, or through various channels designed to report harassment.

The social network’s response to the Foley footage and images is clearly a break from that response: not only did the network respond to reports complaining about posts using the material, they also seem to have proactively sought it out in other instances.

And yet there is not a universal consensus on the use of the images, as was reflected by the New York Post and New York Daily News’ decision to use graphic stills from the footage as their front-page splashes. Here begin the problems for Twitter: the network decided not to ban or suspend either outlet for sharing the images – despite banning other users for doing the same.

Twitter has not been nearly as eager to enter the content policing game in other situations. Like many other major companies, Twitter has long insisted it is not a publisher but a platform.

The distinction is an important one: publishers, such as the Guardian, bear a far greater degree of responsibility for what appears on their sites. By remaining a platform, Twitter is absolved of legal responsibility for most of the content of tweets. But by making what is in essence an editorial decision not to host a certain type of content, Twitter is rapidly blurring that line.

The network has not been as quick to involve itself when its users are sharing content far beyond what is even remotely acceptable – even when the profile of the incidents is high.


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium

What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: — The Message — Medium.

Net Neutrality, Algorithmic Filtering and Ferguson

View image on Twitter

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America.

But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

It’s a clear example of why “saving the Internet”, as it often phrased, is not an abstract issue of concern only to nerds, Silicon Valley bosses, and few NGOs. It’s why “algorithmic filtering” is not a vague concern.

It’s a clear example why net neutrality is a human rights issue; a free speech issue; and an issue of the voiceless being heard, on their own terms.

I saw this play out in multiple countries — my home country of Turkey included — but last night, it became even more heartbreakingly apparent in the United States as well.

For me, last night’s Ferguson “coverage” began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored “robocops” on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters, who seemed to number a few hundred. It was the fourth night after an unarmed black man, Michael Brown, was shot by a — still unnamed — police officer after a “jaywalking” incident. Witnesses say he died hands in the air, saying “don’t shoot”.


¿Contra la libertad de expresión? | ELESPECTADOR.COM

¿Contra la libertad de expresión? | ELESPECTADOR.COM.

El alto tribunal confirmó la sentencia a 18 meses de prisión contra Gonzalo Hernán López por un comentario en la página en internet del diario ‘El País’ de Cali.

Por: Juan Sebastián Jiménez Herrera
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¿Contra la libertad de expresión?López fue condenado por un comentario a una noticia de elpais.com.co en la que se menciona a la presidente de Fededepartamentos, Gloria Escalante. / Ilustración

En un fallo sin precedentes, la Corte Suprema de Justicia acaba de confirmar la condena a 18 meses y 20 días de prisión contra un internauta, Gonzalo Hernán López, por un comentario que dejó en el foro de los lectores de una noticia publicada por elpais.com.co en la que se mencionaba a la hoy directora de la Federación de Departamentos, Gloria Escalante.

“Y con semejante rata como Escalante que hasta del Club Colombia y Comfenalco la han echado por malos manejos que (sic) se puede esperar… ¿El ladrón descubriendo ladrones? ¡Bah!”, fue el comentario hecho por López a la nota titulada “Siguen capturas por ‘cartel de becas’ en Emcali”, publicada por El País de Cali el 26 de noviembre de 2008.

El director de la Fundación para la Libertad de Prensa (Flip), Pedro Vaca, mostró serios reparos al fallo. “Este es un caso desproporcionado. Y la Corte Suprema, en vez de corregir eso y adaptarlo a estándares de libertad de expresión, lo que hace es dejarlo pasar y no abordar el debate de fondo. Es desproporcionado y el impacto que puede tener en el resto de foros de los lectores es muy delicado porque los foros en las páginas web de los periódicos suelen tener este tipo de comentarios. No es que este comentario sea la excepción”.

Por su parte, el analista Omar Rincón indicó que si la justicia va a considerar injuria lo dicho por López pues “(Álvaro) Uribe debería estar en la cárcel por todos los señalamientos que ha hecho y la cantidad de cosas que ha dicho que no son ciertas. Esto muestra una tendencia: que los jueces, la izquierda y la derecha, todos a los que les gusta ser los dueños de la verdad, tienen problemas con internet”.

Y agregó: “Si lo hacen ellos, está bien; si lo hace cualquier ciudadano, es gravísimo. Hay un clasismo alrededor de la opinión. Como si hubiera unos legitimados para opinar. En cambio a un pobre ciudadano que quiso desahogarse lo condenan. Esa es la lucha de internet: que todo ciudadano puede entrar en un diálogo robusto, moral. Ahí hay una discriminación. Si en la prensa tú puedes decir lo que quieras, ¿por qué internet tiene que ser penalizada?”.


I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian

I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian.

Fiction and films, the nearest most of us knowingly get to the world of espionage, give us a series of reliable stereotypes. British spies are hard-bitten, libidinous he-men. Russian agents are thickset, low-browed and facially scarred. And defectors end up as tragic old soaks in Moscow, scanning old copies of the Times for news of the Test match.

Such a fate was anticipated for Edward Snowden by Michael Hayden, a former NSA and CIA chief, who predicted last September that the former NSA analyst would be stranded in Moscow for the rest of his days – “isolated, bored, lonely, depressed… and alcoholic”.

But the Edward Snowden who materialises in our hotel room shortly after noon on the appointed day seems none of those things. A year into his exile in Moscow, he feels less, not more, isolated. If he is depressed, he doesn’t show it. And, at the end of seven hours of conversation, he refuses a beer. “I actually don’t drink.” He smiles when repeating Hayden’s jibe. “I was like, wow, their intelligence is worse than I thought.”

Oliver Stone, who is working on a film about the man now standing in room 615 of the Golden Apple hotel on Moscow’s Malaya Dmitrovka, might struggle to make his subject live up to the canon of great movie spies. The American director has visited Snowden in Moscow, and wants to portray him as an out-and-out hero, but he is an unconventional one: quiet, disciplined, unshowy, almost academic in his speech. If Snowden has vices – and God knows they must have been looking for them – none has emerged in the 13 months since he slipped away from his life as a contracted NSA analyst in Hawaii, intent on sharing the biggest cache of top-secret material the world has ever seen.

Since arriving in Moscow, Snowden has been keeping late and solitary hours – effectively living on US time, tapping away on one of his three computers (three to be safe; he uses encrypted chat, too). If anything, he appears more connected and outgoing than he could be in his former life as an agent. Of his life now, he says, “There’s actually not that much difference. You know, I think there are guys who are just hoping to see me sad. And they’re going to continue to be disappointed.”

When the Guardian first spoke to Snowden a year ago in Hong Kong, he had been dishevelled, his hair uncombed, wearing jeans and a T-shirt. The 31-year-old who materialised last week was smartly, if anonymously, dressed in black trousers and grey jacket, his hair tidily cut. He is jockey-light – even skinnier than a year ago. And he looks pale: “Probably three steps from death,” he jokes. “I mean, I don’t eat a whole lot. I keep a weird schedule. I used to be very active, but just in the recent period I’ve had too much work to focus on.”

 Edward Snowden – video interview

There was no advance warning of where we would meet: his only US television interview, with NBC’s Brian Williams in May, was conducted in an anonymous hotel room of Snowden’s choosing. This time, he prefers to come to us. On his arrival, there is a warm handshake for Guardian reporter Ewen MacAskill, whom he last saw in Hong Kong – a Sunday night after a week of intense work in a frowsty hotel room, a few hours before the video revealing his identity to the world went public. Neither man knew if they would ever meet again.

Snowden orders chicken curry from room service and, as he forks it down, is immediately into the finer points of the story that yanked him from a life of undercover anonymity to global fame. The Snowden-as-alcoholic jibe is not the only moment when he reflects wryly on his former colleagues’ patchy ability to get on top of events over the past year. There was, for instance, the incident last July when a plane carrying President Evo Morales back to Bolivia from Moscow was forced down in Vienna and searched for a stowaway Snowden. “I was like, first off, wow, their intelligence sucks, from listening to everything. But, two, are they really going to the point of just completely humiliating the president of a Latin American nation, the representative of so many people? It was just shockingly poorly thought out, and yet they did it anyway, and they keep at these sort of mistakes.” It was as if they were trying not to find him. “I almost felt like I had some sort of friend in government.”


Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com.

Exclusive: Whistleblower says NSA revelations mean those with duty to protect confidentiality must urgently upgrade security• Watch Snowden’s interview with the Guardian in Moscow• Read the full interview with Snowden by Alan Rusbridger and Ewen MacAskill on Friday

The NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden, has urged lawyers, journalists, doctors, accountants, priests and others with a duty to protect confidentiality to upgrade security in the wake of the spy surveillance revelations.

Snowden said professionals were failing in their obligations to their clients, sources, patients and parishioners in what he described as a new and challenging world.

“What last year’s revelations showed us was irrefutable evidence that unencrypted communications on the internet are no longer safe. Any communications should be encrypted by default,” he said.

The response of professional bodies has so far been patchy.

A minister at the Home Office in London, James Brokenshire, said during a Commons debate about a new surveillance bill on Tuesday that a code of practice to protect legal professional privilege and others requiring professional secrecy was under review.

Snowden’s plea for the professions to tighten security came during an extensive and revealing interview with the Guardian in Moscow.

The former National Security Agency and CIA computer specialist, wanted by the US under the Espionage Act after leaking tens of thousands of top secret documents, has given only a handful of interviews since seeking temporary asylum in Russia a year ago.

Edward Snowden during his interview with Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and reporter Ewen MacAskill Edward Snowden during his interview with the Guardian in Moscow. Photograph: Alan Rusbridger for the Guardian

During the seven hours of interview, Snowden:

• Said if he ended up in US detention in Guantánamo Bay he could live with it.

• Offered rare glimpses into his daily life in Russia, insisting that, contrary to reports that he is depressed, he is not sad and does not have any regrets. He rejected various conspiracy theories surrounding him, describing as “bullshit” suggestions he is a Russian spy.

• Said that, contrary to a claim he works for a Russian organisation, he was independently secure, living on savings, and money from awards and speeches he has delivered online round the world.

• Made a startling claim that a culture exists within the NSA in which, during surveillance, nude photographs picked up of people in “sexually compromising” situations are routinely passed around.

• Spoke at length about his future, which seems destined to be spent in Russia for the foreseeable future after expressing disappointment over the failure of western European governments to offer him a home.

• Said he was holding out for a jury trial in the US rather a judge-only one, hopeful that it would be hard to find 12 jurors who would convict him if he was charged with an offence to which there was a public interest defence. Negotiations with the US government on a return to his country appear to be stalled.


Sarah Harrison: "No poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra"

Sarah Harrison: “No poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra”.

La periodista de  Wikileaks acusa a EEUU y sus aliados de haber de haber iniciado una batalla contra Wikileaks que demuestra realmente que la organización es una amenaza para “los secretos que quieren mantener ocultos”.

“Cometimos un error al editar demasiado los diarios de guerra de Irak, prácticamente se convirtieron en ilegibles, pero aprendimos la lección de que el discurso del gobierno de EEUU sobre la seguridad nacional es una estafa”.

 

 

Sarah Harrison. Foto: Deutsche Welle

Sarah Harrison. Foto: Deutsche Welle

 

Sarah Harrison, periodista de investigación en Wikileaks, fue una de las acompañantes de Edward Snowden en su vuelo de Hong Kong a Moscú en junio de 2013. Una vez en la capital rusa, pasó 39 días con él en la zona de tránsito del aeropuerto, asistiéndole en el proceso legal de solicitud de asilo a diversos países.

Tras conseguir el asilo temporal en el país ruso permaneció con el exempleado de la CIA y la NSA durante otros tres meses. Este contacto con el protagonista del Cablegate y su trabajo dentro de la perseguida plataforma de filtración de documentos, le han convertido en uno de los múltiples objetivos de lo que ella misma denomina el “poder incalculable” de un enorme “entramado global de inteligencia, diplomático y militar”, creado por Estados Unidos y sus aliados con el fin de ver y controlarlo todo.

Ciberespionaje, escuchas telefónicas indiscriminadas, intervenciones de cables diplomáticos… “Wikileaks ha hecho mucho por exponer este sistema de control globalizado” y por ello Estados Unidos va con “todo su poder” tras ellos, explica Harrison durante su intervención en el Global Media Forum organizado por la cadena pública alemana Deutsche Welle y celebrado en Bonn. Y sobre todo a exponerlo de una forma en la que el poder de decisión sobre la historia no reside únicamente en un periodista sino en el público.

“Algunas de las mejores historias de Wikileaks han salido del propio público, consultando ellos mismos los documentos publicados e incluso utilizándolos en sus propias causas legales en ocasiones. Precisamente, la capacidad de dar poder a la gente y el hecho de no poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra”.

Y en su empeño por controlar estas incontrolables fuentes de información, Estados Unidos no duda en tomar “múltiples y extraordinarias medidas, como reunir a sus aliados europeos y obligar al avión del presidente de un país a aterrizar violando leyes internacionales. Han iniciado un bloqueo financiero contra nosotros –se han descubierto conversaciones de Mastercard con el FBI— y de repente ya nadie puede hacernos donaciones, mientras por ejemplo se puede seguir donando al Ku Klux Klan. Así que sí, debemos ser peligrosos”, ironiza.


Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Se cumplen 24 meses de la entrada del ‘exhacker’ en la Embajada ecuatoriana en Londres

 

/ Londres / Quito 18 JUN 2014 – 21:40 CET

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

 

El pulso político y diplomático que encarna el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, permanece enquistado cuando se cumplen este jueves dos años de su entrada en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres, donde sigue refugiado bajo riesgo de ser arrestado si pone un pie fuera del recinto. Mientras el Gobierno ecuatoriano sostiene que el exhacker, que la fiscalía sueca quiere interrogar por posibles delitos sexuales, “no es un fugitivo” sino un asilado bajo su amparo, las autoridades británicas persisten en su empeño de detenerlo por haber violado los términos de la libertad condicional aquel 19 de junio de 2012, y mantienen un cerco policial en torno a la legación cuya factura ya roza los seis millones de libras.

 

En todas las entrevistas hechas a Assange, durante los dos años que lleva en el recinto diplomático, ha habido una pregunta constante. ¿Cómo es vivir en una embajada? Sus respuestas han permitido conocer que pasa los días confinado en una oficina de 20 metros cuadrados convertida en habitación. En ese espacio trabaja (jornadas de 17 horas frente a un ordenador), se ejercita (en una cinta para correr que le regaló el cineasta Ken Loach) y recibe visitas, según los reportes del periódico británico The Daily Mail en 2012. Por declaraciones de uno de sus abogados, Baltasar Garzón, se sabe que su mobiliario incluye una cama, una mesa, una estantería y ahí se acaba su mundo.

 

El propio australiano comparecerá en una rueda de prensa en conexión internauta este jueves con el ministro de Exteriores ecuatoriano, Ricardo Patiño, según este anunció su cuenta de Twitter sin precisar más detalles.


Edward Snowden NSA whistleblowing story to be filmed by Oliver Stone | Film | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden NSA whistleblowing story to be filmed by Oliver Stone | Film | theguardian.com.

Director of Platoon and JFK will direct a big budget adaptation of Guardian journalist Luke Harding’s book about Snowden’s role in exposing the NSA’s surveillance culture• Oliver Stone on US history: ‘America always wins’

 

 

 

Edward Snowden

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. His story is being adapted into a film by director Oliver Stone. Photograph: Guardian

 

He has tackled the Kennedy assassination and the Watergate break-in, the Vietnam conflict and the Bush administration’s “war on terror”. Now the Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone is set to whip up fresh controversy with his adaptation of The Snowden Files, an account of the ongoing NSA scandal written by the Guardian journalist Luke Harding.

Stone’s thriller will focus on the experiences of the American whistleblower Edward Snowden, a contractor at the National Security Agency who leaked thousands of classified documents to the former Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald back in June 2013. The film is to be produced by Stone’s regular business partner Moritz Borman, with Harding and other Guardian journalists serving as production and story consultants.

“This is one of the greatest stories of our time,” Stone, 67, said in a statement. “A real challenge. I’m glad to have the Guardian working with us.” Stone’s previous films include Platoon, JFK and W. The director has also made documentaries on Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez, together with a 2012 TV series, Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States.

Snowden’s revelations, first reported in the Guardian, lifted the lid on a culture of mass government surveillance, sparked a global furore and forced the Obama administration onto the back foot. Secretary of state John Kerry later conceded that the NSA’s programme had “reached too far” and should be curtailed. Snowden’s fate, however, remains in the balance. The former NSA employee has been granted temporary asylum in Russia but faces a 30-year prison sentence if he returns to the US.

Published earlier this year, The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man charts the political awakening of the twentysomething Snowden, a committed Republican who found his libertarian values increasingly at odds with his government’s surveillance programme. A review in the New York Times hailed Harding’s book as “a fast-paced, almost novelistic narrative that is part bildungsroman and part cinematic thriller.”

Oliver Stone at the Beijing international film festival Oliver Stone, who will direct the biopic. Photograph: ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images


Edward Snowden se convierte en héroe de cómic | Gente | EL PAÍS

Edward Snowden se convierte en héroe de cómic | Gente | EL PAÍS.


Imagen de la editorial Bluewater Productions de la portada del cómic basado en Edward Snowden. / EFE

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Edward Snowden, el antiguo colaborador de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) que filtró la información sobre el espionaje masivo de esa agencia, se ha convertido en el protagonista de un cómic. Escrito por Valerie D’Orazio y con dibujos de Dan Lauer, con un guion de carácter biográfico, el libro de historietas se publicará el miércoles tanto en papel como en formato digital, según ha anunciado en un comunicado la editorial Bluewater Productions.

El cómic, denominado Beyond: Edward Snowden, trata de mostrar a la persona que se esconde detrás de los titulares e indaga en los motivos que le empujaron a llevar a cabo una de las mayores filtraciones de información clasificada de la historia de Estados Unidos, según explica la editorial. D’Orazio, autora del texto del cómic, dice que su trabajo “proporciona una mirada a una vertiente de Edward Snowden que el público nunca ha visto realmente antes”.


Glenn Greenwald: 'I don't trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme' | World news | The Guardian

Glenn Greenwald: ‘I don’t trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme’ | World news | The Guardian.

He has been lauded and vilified in equal measure. But did the journalist’s ‘outsider’ status help him land Edward Snowden’s NSA revelations? Why did he nearly miss the story? And how powerless did he feel when his partner was detained at Heathrow? One year after the scoop, we meet him in his jungle paradise in Rio

 

 

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice'… Glenn Greenwald in Rio'

Snowden’s the one who made the greatest sacrifice’… Glenn Greenwald in Rio’ Photograph: Jimmy Chalk for the Guardian

 

The dogs can smell Glenn Greenwald long before they see him. As we drive up the hill to his house, a cacophony of barking greets us. The chorus is so overwhelming it makes me think of the National Security Agency (NSA) chiefs who Greenwald has tormented over the past year.”They don’t bite,” Greenwald says as we are engulfed by the pack of strays that he and his partner, David Miranda, have rescued. After a beat, he adds: “… as long as you don’t show any fear.” I’m not certain he’s joking, which is awkward, given that there are 12 of them, ranging from an 80lb Burmese mountain dog to a rat-sized miniature pinscher.

The image of Greenwald and his dogs has been beamed around the world by news organisations since his first NSA revelations were published by the Guardian last year. A writer with a devoted following even before the revelations, he now enjoys more widespread exposure, particularly in the US where his brand of aggressive campaigning journalism has attracted both paeans and condemnation.

But the sight of him surrounded by the animals still comes as a shock. It underlines how dramatically the internet has revolutionised journalism and the nature of the newsroom.

Think of that legendary 1973 photograph of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein at the height of Watergate. They are sitting at manual typewriters under neon lights in the Washington Post newsroom. The photo speaks to the power of institutions – that of their newspaper just as much as the White House they were investigating.

Now think of where I’m standing in Glenn Greenwald’s retreat, shrouded in jackfruit, banana and lemon trees, where monkeys call in daily and only yesterday a lethal spider the size of a fist was discovered in the bathroom. This is the newsroom of 2014, almost 5,000 miles from Washington DC, the jungle office of the journalist that the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden handpicked to be his conduit to the outside world.

As the anniversary approaches of Greenwald’s first Guardian scoop on 5 June 2013, revealing that the NSA was collecting the telephone records of millions of Americans, his life appears to have calmed a bit. He’s taking the time to get his fitness back after a stressful period, doing yoga by a stream in the garden and eating calorie-controlled ready meals in an attempt to shed the 12lbs he put on.


El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Glenn Greenwald relata en su libro cuando Snowden pensaba que había sido descubierto


Glenn Greenwald, el 10 de junio de 2013, mientras atendía a los periodistas en su hotel de Hong Kong. / VINCENT YU (AP)

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El jueves [6 de junio], ya el quinto día en Hong Kong, fui a la habitación de hotel de Snowden, quien enseguida me dijo que tenía noticias “algo alarmantes”. Un dispositivo de seguridad conectado a Internet que compartía con su novia de toda la vida había detectado que dos personas de la NSA —alguien de recursos humanos y un “policía” de la agencia— habían acudido a su casa buscándole a él.

Para Snowden eso significaba casi con seguridad que la NSA [Agencia Nacional de Seguridad de EE UU] lo había identificado como la probable fuente de las filtraciones, pero yo me mostré escéptico. “Si creyeran que tú has hecho esto, mandarían hordas de agentes del FBI y seguramente unidades de élite, no un simple agente y una persona de recursos humanos”. Supuse que se trataba de una indagación automática y rutinaria, justificada por el hecho de que un empleado de la NSA se ausenta durante varias semanas sin dar explicaciones. Sin embargo, Snowden sugería que habían mandado gente de perfil bajo adrede para no llamar la atención de los medios ni desencadenar la eliminación de pruebas.

“En Guantánamo me pido la litera de abajo”, bromeó Snowden mientras meditaba sobre la estrategia a seguir

Al margen del significado de la noticia, recalqué la necesidad de preparar rápidamente el artículo y el vídeo en el que Snowden se daba a conocer como la fuente de las revelaciones. Estábamos decididos a que el mundo supiera de Snowden, de sus acciones y sus motivaciones, por el propio Snowden, no a través de una campaña de demonización lanzada por el Gobierno norteamericano mientras él estaba escondido o bajo custodia o era incapaz de hablar por sí mismo..


Is there any evidence of a link between violent video games and murder? | Pete Etchells and Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com

Is there any evidence of a link between violent video games and murder? | Pete Etchells and Chris Chambers | Science | theguardian.com.

Journalists need to stop repeating baseless claims and scientists need to stop bickering

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Research into the effects of video games on aggression hasn’t got to the point where it can tell us anything about murder. Photograph: Ina Fassbender/Reuters

In the wake of the killing of the schoolteacher Ann Maguire last week, the question has again been raised of whether playing violent video games could lead someone to commit murder. It’s a common link that we see suggested in the media whenever tragedies of this sort occur, but the scientific evidence simply doesn’t support these claims.

The most recent data that we have on the links between video game use and aggressive behavioural outcomes comes from a meta-analysis, published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin in January 2014. Researchers from the University of Innsbruck looked at 98 studies, testing nearly 37,000 participants since 2009. They found that, overall, video games do affect the social behaviour of players – violent video game use is linked to an increase in aggressive outcomes and a decrease in prosocial outcomes. On the other hand prosocial games show the opposite effect – they’re linked to a reduction in aggressive behaviour and an increase in prosocial, cooperative behaviour.

At first glance these findings might suggest that there is something to the suggestion that violent videogames encourage acts of violence, but the link is actually quite tenuous. Psychological studies on aggression and video games tend to rely on measures of aggression that are a far cry from murder. For example, one experimental test that’s often used is a modified version of the Taylor Competitive Reaction Time Task. Here the participants are first asked to play either a violent or non-violent video game. Afterwards, they’re asked to play a reaction time game against another, fictional player. If they win a particular encounter, they get to blast their opponent with a loud noise. The key manipulation is that the participants choose how loud the noise is, and how long it lasts for. Longer, louder noises are taken as a measure of increased aggression.


How Edward Snowden went from loyal NSA contractor to whistleblower | World news | The Guardian

How Edward Snowden went from loyal NSA contractor to whistleblower | World news | The Guardian.

He was politically conservative, a gun owner, a geek – and the man behind the biggest intelligence leak in history. In this exclusive extract from his new book, Luke Harding looks at Edward Snowden’s journey from patriot to America’s most wanted
Edward Snowden illustrationView larger picture

Click for full picture. Image by Kyle Bean for the Guardian

In late December 2001, someone calling themselves TheTrueHOOHA had a question. He was an 18-year-old American male with impressive IT skills and a sharp intelligence. His real identity was unknown. Everyone who posted on Ars Technica, a popular technology website, did so anonymously.

  1. The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man
  2. by Luke Harding
  1. Tell us what you think:Star-rate and review this book

TheTrueHOOHA wanted to set up his own web server. It was a Saturday morning, a little after 11am. He posted: “It’s my first time. Be gentle. Here’s my dilemma: I want to be my own host. What do I need?”

Soon, regular users were piling in with helpful suggestions. TheTrueHOOHA replied: “Ah, the vast treasury of geek knowledge that is Ars.” He would become a prolific contributor; over the next eight years, he authored nearly 800 comments. He described himself variously as “unemployed”, a failed soldier, a “systems editor”, and someone who had US State Department security clearance.

His home was on the east coast of America in the state of Maryland, near Washington DC. But by his mid-20s he was already an international man of mystery. He popped up in Europe – in Geneva, London, Ireland, Italy and Bosnia. He travelled to India. Despite having no degree, he knew an astonishing amount about computers. His politics appeared staunchly Republican. He believed strongly in personal liberty, defending, for example, Australians who farmed cannabis plants.

At times he could be rather obnoxious. He called one fellow-Arsian, for example, a “cock”; others who disagreed with his sink-or-swim views on social security were “fucking retards”.

His chat logs cover a colourful array of themes: gaming, girls, sex, Japan, the stock market, his disastrous stint in the US army, his negative impressions of multiracial Britain (he was shocked by the number of “Muslims” in east London and wrote, “I thought I had gotten off of the plane in the wrong country… it was terrifying”), the joys of gun ownership (“I have a Walther P22. It’s my only gun but I love it to death,” he wrote in 2006). In their own way, the logs form a Bildungsroman.

Then, in 2009, the entries fizzle away. In February 2010, TheTrueHOOHA mentions a thing that troubles him: pervasive government surveillance. “Society really seems to have developed an unquestioning obedience towards spooky types… Did we get to where we are today via a slippery slope that was entirely within our control to stop? Or was it a relatively instantaneous sea change that sneaked in undetected because of pervasive government secrecy?”

TheTrueHOOHA’s last post is on 21 May 2012. After that, he disappears, a lost electronic signature amid the vastness of cyberspace. He was, we now know, Edward Snowden.


El quinto poder en acción y la aplastante influencia de WikiLeaks

El quinto poder en acción y la aplastante influencia de WikiLeaks.

El 16 de enero pasado se estrenó en los cines El quinto poder, película que retrata el arribo de Wikileaks a la sociedad y cómo de la mano de su creador, Julian Assange, el poder mundial sucumbió ante la revolución de la transparencia informática del siglo XXI.

 

Internet es la mayor liberación desde la invención de la imprenta. Aun mayor que la radio y la TV, pues a diferencia de estas, aún no ha sido monopolizada. Comparable solo con el poder del invento de Guttenberg, el que marcó el principio del fin de la Edad Media y que durante los siguientes 500 años todo lo alteraría. Fundamentalmente produjo un colosal cambio en el equilibrio del poder, y nacieron desde el periodismo hasta las naciones y la democracia, tal como la entendemos hoy.

Tal fue el poder del libro para las masas que la página impresa a escala industrial produjo el efecto de liberar el acceso a la información (suena parecido a internet), pasando así del mundo mágico de curanderos a la tomografía computarizada y los doctores incapaces de hacer diagnósticos sin costosos exámenes de imágenes. Saltamos en ese tránsito de la superstición a las vacunas. De la fe ciega a la ciencia cierta. Del feudo a la ciudad, del horario natural a los relojes de pulsera.

El quinto poder, dirigida por Bill Condon, nos habla del encuentro de Julian Assange y Daniel Domscheit-Berg, las mentes detrás del portal WikiLeaks, una plataforma que permite filtrar información secreta de forma anónima poniendo al descubierto a organizaciones, corporaciones e incluso poderosos gobiernos.

el_quinto_poder

WikiLeaks es a la era de la información lo que la máquina a vapor significó para la revolución industrial. Se hace difícil comprender el porqué de los cambios de esta envergadura que se suceden a diario frente a nuestros ojos. No se trata de un párrafo de un libro, es nuestra propia existencia la que se ve alterada, y por eso nos cuesta de sobremanera aceptar que el mundo en el que nacimos y sus reglas -según las cuales seguimos viviendo-, a veces, con enternecedora inocencia, han desaparecido.

En el mundo de la información existe un antes y un después de WikiLeaks. La web divulgó ante el mundo antecedentes secretos como la ideología xenófoba de un partido político en Reino Unido; el ataque indiscriminado del ejército de EE.UU. contra hombres desarmados en Irak, entre los que se encontraban periodistas, hombres desarmados y niños; o los papeles que revelan muertes de civiles y el doble juego de Pakistán en la lucha contra los talibanes. Y, hace pocos días, reveló el borrador del acuerdo sobre propiedad intelectual del TLC Transpacífico (TPP), actualmente bajo cláusula de confidencialidad, pese a su relevancia pública.

Pero sin dudas fue el denominado “Cablegate” el caso que detonó la ira de Washington. La desclasificación de 250 mil cables diplomáticos del gobierno de EE.UU. que fueron analizados y publicados por cinco importantes diarios a los que la organización facilitó la información.


The New York Times pide clemencia para Edward Snowden – El Mostrador

The New York Times pide clemencia para Edward Snowden – El Mostrador.

“Considerando el valor enorme de la información que ha revelado y los abusos que ha expuesto, Snowden merece algo mejor que una vida de exilio, miedo y fuga permanente”, sostuvo el diario norteamericano en un editorial.

Edward Snowden 55

El diario The New York Times indicó en un editorial que el ex contratista de los servicios de espionaje de Estados Unidos Edward Snowden merece clemencia después de revelar los programas masivos de espionaje telefónico y en internet por parte de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA).

“Hace siete meses el mundo empezó a conocer el vasto alcance de las intromisiones de la NSA en las vidas de cientos de millones de personas en Estados Unidos y el resto del mundo”, señala el editorial.

“Las revelaciones ya han llevado a dos jueces federales a acusar a la NSA de violar la Constitución (aunque un tercero, desafortunadamente, encontró que el espionaje al por mayor es legal)”, continúa.

“Todo esto se debe, enteramente, a la información provista a los periodistas por Edward Snowden, el ex contratista de la NSA que sustrajo una gran cantidad de documentos secretos”, recuerda el editorial.

“Considerando el valor enorme de la información que ha revelado y los abusos que ha expuesto, Snowden merece algo mejor que una vida de exilio, miedo y fuga permanente”, según el Times.


Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden voted Guardian person of the year 2013 | World news | theguardian.com.

NSA whistleblower’s victory, for exposing the scale of internet surveillance, follows that of Chelsea Manning last year
Edward Snowden

In May Edward Snowden flew to Hong Kong where he gave journalists the material which blew the lid on the extent of US digital spying. Photograph: The Guardian/AFP/Getty Images

For the second year in a row, a young American whistleblower alarmed at the unfettered and at times cynical deployment of power by the world’s foremost superpower has been voted the Guardian’s person of the year.

Edward Snowden, who leaked an estimated 200,000 files that exposed the extensive and intrusive nature of phone and internet surveillance and intelligence gathering by the US and its western allies, was the overwhelming choice of more than 2,000 people who voted.

The NSA whistleblower garnered 1,445 votes. In a distant second, from a list of 10 candidates chosen by Guardian writers and editors, cameMarco Weber and Sini Saarela, the Greenpeace activists who spearheaded the oil rig protest over Russian Arctic drilling. They received 314 votes. Pope Francis gained 153 votes, narrowly ahead of blogger and anti-poverty campaigner Jack Monroe, who received 144. Snowden’s victory was as decisive as Chelsea Manning’s a year earlier.


La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS

La sombra de MacCarthy planea sobre ‘The Guardian’ | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El director de ‘The Guardian’, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes. / AP

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En Internet se pueden encontrar numerosas definiciones de maccarthysmo, o macartismo, una palabra derivada de la persecución lanzada entre 1950 y 1954 por el senador estadounidense Joe McCarthy contra supuestos comunistas y traidores a la patria, durante la guerra fría.

Olvídense de la palabra comunista, mantengan lo de traidores a la patria y piensen en lo que está ocurriendo en Reino Unido con el diarioThe Guardian por denunciar los abusos del espionaje estadounidense y británico, sino mundial, al publicar parte de los documentos que le hizo llegar el ex empleado subcontratado de la CIA Edward Snowden.

El macartismo se puede definir como “la práctica de publicitar acusaciones de deslealtad política o subversión sin atender debidamente a las pruebas”. O “el uso de métodos investigativos o acusatorios injustos con el objetivo de suprimir la oposición”. O “el uso de acusaciones sin base con cualquier objetivo”. O “el uso de acusaciones no corroboradas o técnicas investigadoras injustas en un intento por exponer deslealtad o subversión”. O “cualquier intento de restringir la crítica política o la discrepancia individual con la excusa de que es antipatriótico o pro-comunista”.

Cualquiera de ellas se puede aplicar a lo que le está pasando alGuardian, víctima de una campaña lanzada por los servicios secretos y jaleada por la prensa rival y por el primer ministro David Cameron personalmente, con el inestimable apoyo de diputados conservadores y también de algún laborista y de los medios rivales. El clímax, hasta ahora, de esa campaña se alcanzó el martes de esta semana con la comparecencia del director del periódico, Alan Rusbridger, ante la comisión de Interior de la Cámara de los Comunes.

“¿Ama usted este país?”, llegó a preguntar un diputado laborista al director de ‘The Guardian’

Esa comparecencia, en la que algunos diputados se comportaron con una fogosidad que se echó en falta cuando hace unos días los responsable de los servicios secretos comparecieron ante otra comisión parlamentaria, tuvo también su momento culminante. Fue cuando el presidente de la comisión, el incombustible diputado (más de un cuarto de siglo en la cámara) laborista Keith Vaz puso una mirada de perro degollado y con la más suave de las voces le preguntó a Rusbridger: “Parte de las críticas contra usted y The Guardian han sido muy, muy personales. Usted y yo hemos nacido fuera de este país, pero yo amo este país. ¿Ama usted este país?”. ¿Hay algo más macartista que insinuar que alguien hace algo políticamente significativo porque no es un patriota?


El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El ‘ángel de la guarda’ de Snowden | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Sarah Harrison, la semana pasada, en Berlín. / GIAN PAUL LOZZA

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Hay una mujer que se ha quedado varada en Berlín. No quiere volver a su país de origen, Reino Unido, porque sus abogados le han dicho que corre el peligro de ser detenida. Se llama Sarah Harrison. Tiene 31 años. La mano derecha de Julian Assange en la plataforma de filtraciones WikiLeaks se convirtió el verano pasado en una tabla de salvación para Edward Snowden, el exanalista de la NSA que ha destapado el espionaje masivo que la agencia de inteligencia estadounidense ejerce a lo largo y ancho del planeta. Le solucionó la vida. O se la salvó.

Auxiliar al hombre más buscado por los servicios secretos de las superpotencias tiene un precio: no poder volver tranquilamente a casa.

La cita es en Berlín. Y nace envuelta en el misterio, como suele ser marca de la casa en la organización que comanda el editor australiano Julian Assange: cuestiones de seguridad. Hasta el último momento no se sabe dónde se realizará la entrevista. Pocos minutos antes de celebrarse, un mensaje da una indicación. Una esquina, un callejón, un viejo ascensor de mercancías y, por fin, un espacio diáfano del que no se pueden dar detalles. Sarah Harrison espera, risueña, con su chaqueta de cuero negra.

El currículum de esta británica no es poca cosa. En los últimos cuatro años ha estado en primera línea en dos de las filtraciones más importantes de la historia: los conocidos Papeles de Departamento de Estado, que exponían los tejemanejes de la política exterior estadounidense; y los Papeles de Snowden, que destapan el uso indiscriminado de programas como PRISMA para espiar las comunicaciones de toda persona fuera de territorio estadounidense, incluidos los teléfonos móviles de 35 líderes mundiales.


An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com

An open letter from Carl Bernstein to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger | Media | theguardian.com.

Watergate scandal journalist’s letter comes as Guardian editor prepares to appear before MPs over Edward Snowden leaks

 

 

Carl Bernstein

Carl Bernstein, Watergate journalist and author, who has written a letter to the Guardian editor, Alan Rusbridger, who is to be questioned by MPs over the NSA revelations. Photograph: Teri Pengilley

 

Dear Alan,

There is plenty of time – and there are abundant venues – to debate relevant questions about Mr Snowden’s historical role, his legal fate, the morality of his actions, and the meaning of the information he has chosen to disclose.

But your appearance before the Commons today strikes me as something quite different in purpose and dangerously pernicious: an attempt by the highest UK authorities to shift the issue from government policies and excessive government secrecy in the United States and Great Britain to the conduct of the press – which has been quite admirable and responsible in the case of the Guardian, particularly, and the way it has handled information initially provided by Mr Snowden.


Julian Assange y Calle 13, la extraña pareja musical

Julian Assange y Calle 13, la extraña pareja musical.

Multi_Viral es el tema que el grupo portorriqueño Calle 13 ha compuesto junto con el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange

La canción, que se estrena el 13 de noviembre, arremete contra la manipulación informativa: “Vamos a hablar contra el mal periodismo”, dice René Pérez

11/11/2013 – 11:23h

“Vamos a coger sus ideas y las manipularemos para construir la canción. Vamos a hablar contra el mal periodismo, pero utilizando sus propias voces”. Así explica René Pérez, alias Residente, vocalista del grupo portorriqueño Calle 13, a un atento Julian Assange su intención de convertir el tema Multi_Viral en un canto a la mala praxis periodística. El encuentro -donde fue grabado el vídeo- tuvo lugar el pasado 13 de junio dentro de la embajada ecuatoriana en Londres, donde el fundador de Wikileaks lleva refugiado más de un año.


Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com

Snowden leaks: David Cameron urges committee to investigate Guardian | World news | theguardian.com.

PM says leaks have damaged national security and suggests MPs could ‘examine issue and make further recommendations’

David Cameron

David Cameron speaks during prime minister’s questions, where he said: ‘The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security.’ Photograph: PA

David Cameron has encouraged a Commons select committee to investigate whether the Guardian has broken the law or damaged national security by publishing secrets leaked by the National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

He made his proposal in response to a question from former defence secretary Liam Fox, saying the Guardian had been guilty of double standards for exposing the scandal of phone hacking by newspapersand yet had gone on to publish secrets from the NSA taken by Snowden.

Speaking at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Cameron said: “The plain fact is that what has happened has damaged national security and in many ways the Guardian themselves admitted that when they agreed, when asked politely by my national security adviser and cabinet secretary to destroy the files they had, they went ahead and destroyed those files.