Egypt blocks access to news websites including Al-Jazeera and Mada Masr | World news | The Guardian

Egypt has blocked access to at least 21 news sites critical of the government, notably the Qatari channel Al-Jazeera, Huffington Post’s Arabic-language site HuffPost Arabi and the independent website Mada Masr.

Fuente: Egypt blocks access to news websites including Al-Jazeera and Mada Masr | World news | The Guardian


La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador

En la economía de Internet, Asia suele ser la precursora de nuevos servicios tales como aplicaciones de mensajería o pagos móviles. Ahora ha avanzado con una nueva tendencia: más gente que en otras partes del mundo ha instalado en sus teléfonos móviles software para bloquear la publicidad de internet.

Fuente: La batalla prácticamente perdida contra el bloqueo de avisos en el teléfono – El Mostrador


Congreso Mundial de medios informativos de WAN-IFRA analiza amenaza de los ‘ad-blocker’ a la publicidad en Internet – El Mostrador

La industria de la publicidad en Internet, que constituye una parte importante de los ingresos de los medios de comunicación digitales, vive momentos complejos ante la creciente demanda en todo el mundo de los ad-blocker, navegadores que prometen a los usuarios mejorar su experiencia eliminando todos los anuncios de las páginas que visitan.

Fuente: Congreso Mundial de medios informativos de WAN-IFRA analiza amenaza de los ‘ad-blocker’ a la publicidad en Internet – El Mostrador


What's Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name? – The Intercept

What’s Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name? – The Intercept.

Featured photo - What’s Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name?

The French Interior Ministry on Monday ordered that five websites be blocked on the grounds that they promote or advocate terrorism. “I do not want to see sites that could lead people to take up arms on the Internet,” proclaimed Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve.

When the block functions properly, visitors to those banned sites, rather than accessing the content of the sites they chose to visit, will be automatically redirected to the Interior Ministry website. There, they will be greeted by a graphic of a large red hand, and text informing them that they were attempting to access a site that causes or promotes terrorism: “you are being redirected to this official website since your computer was about to connect with a page that provokes terrorist acts or condones terrorism publicly.”

No judge reviews the Interior Ministry’s decisions. The minister first requests that the website owner voluntarily remove the content he deems transgressive; upon disobedience, the minister unilaterally issues the order to Internet service providers for the sites to be blocked. This censorship power is vested pursuant to a law recently enacted in France empowering the interior minister to block websites.

Forcibly taking down websites deemed to be supportive of terrorism, or criminalizing speech deemed to “advocate” terrorism, is a major trend in both Europe and the West generally. Last month in Brussels, the European Union’s counter-terrorism coordinator issued a memo proclaiming that “Europe is facing an unprecedented, diverse and serious terrorist threat,” and argued that increased state control over the Internet is crucial to combating it.

The memo noted that “the EU and its Member States have developed several initiatives related to countering radicalisation and terrorism on the Internet,” yet argued that more must be done. It argued that the focus should be on “working with the main players in the Internet industry [a]s the best way to limit the circulation of terrorist material online.” It specifically hailed the tactics of the U.K. Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), which has succeeded in causing the removal of large amounts of material it deems “extremist”:

In addition to recommending the dissemination of “counter-narratives” by governments, the memo also urged EU member states to “examine the legal and technical possibilities to remove illegal content.”