Chelsea Manning: I leaked reports after seeing how Americans ignored wars | US news | The Guardian

Manning describes ‘two worlds’ – one in the US and one she witnessed in Iraq – in New York Times interview days after her release from military prison

Fuente: Chelsea Manning: I leaked reports after seeing how Americans ignored wars | US news | The Guardian


Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms

“To give them the space to crush us with misappropriated secrets is a perversion of what our great Constitution stands for. It ends now.” At no point did Pompeo specify what steps the CIA intended to take to ensure that the “space” to publish secrets “ends now.”

Fuente: Trump’s CIA Director Pompeo, Targeting WikiLeaks, Explicitly Threatens Speech and Press Freedoms


Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks founder qualifies his pledge to accept extradition to the US in interview with Australian current affairs programme The Project

Fuente: Julian Assange: ‘Chelsea Manning clemency was bid to make life hard for me’ | Media | The Guardian


Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian

WikiLeaks tweeted last week that Assange would agree to US extradition if Obama granted Manning clemency. Asked during a web broadcast on Thursday if he would now leave the embassy, Assange said: “I stand by everything I said, including the offer to go to the United States if Chelsea Manning’s sentence was commuted.”

Fuente: Julian Assange confirms he is willing to travel to US after Manning decision | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

At the time of her revelations, she was the most important whistleblower since Daniel Ellsberg. Upon hearing the news today, Ellsberg said this: “Once in a while, someone does what they ought to do. Some go to prison for it, for seven years; some accept exile for life. But sometimes even a president does it. And today, it was Obama.”

Fuente: Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian

A lawyer for Julian Assange has indicated that the WikiLeaks founder is ready to face extradition to the US after Barack Obama commuted the sentence of US army whistleblower Chelsea Manning.

Fuente: Julian Assange ready for US extradition, one of his lawyers suggests | Media | The Guardian


Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian

The White House insisted on Tuesday that Assange’s offer to submit to extradition if Obama “grants Manning clemency” did not influence the president’s action.

Fuente: Chelsea Manning’s prison sentence commuted by Barack Obama | US news | The Guardian


Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks

El presidente estadounidense, Barack Obama, conmutó la pena de prisión a quien fuera fuente de Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning.Según la información de la Casa Blanca, la exsoldado será liberada el próximo 17 de mayo, aunque se encontraba condenada a una pena de cárcel de 35 años.

Fuente: Obama libera a exsoldado que actuó como fuente en caso WikiLeaks


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen

WikiLeaks, definida por su fundador, Julian Assange como “una gran biblioteca de la rebelión”, lleva diez años publicando más información secreta que todos los demás medios de prensa combinados. Las revelaciones informaron al público sobre tratados secretos, vigilancia masiva, ataques contra civiles, torturas y asesinatos cometido por los gobiernos de EE.UU. y otros países.

Fuente: WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen


In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever

One of the very few remaining avenues for learning what the U.S. government is doing — beyond the propaganda that it wants Americans to ingest and thus deliberately disseminates through media outlets — is leaking and whistleblowing. Among the leading U.S. heroes in the war on terror have been the men and women inside various agencies of the U.S. government who discovered serious wrongdoing being carried out in secret, and then risked their own personal welfare to ensure that the public learned of what never should have been hidden in the first place.

Fuente: In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever


US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian

The journalist John Pilger, a close ally and frequent visitor of Assange in the embassy, told the Guardian that Assange “will have a contingency”, and stressed that WikiLeaks was bigger than its founder.“I can’t imagine that the restrictions will stop the leaks or deter WikiLeaks and Assange,” he said. “The significance of the action by Ecuador, which is clearly under pressure, is to show how frightened the US establishment is of further revelations reaching the public about its preferred presidential candidate.”

Fuente: US and Ecuador deny conspiring to take Julian Assange offline | Media | The Guardian


Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election

The government of Ecuador confirmed on Tuesday that it had decided “to temporarily restrict access” to the internet inside its embassy in London, effectively cutting off Julian Assange, the editor of Wikileaks, who has lived there since he was granted political asylum in 2012.Assange first reported on Monday that his internet connection had been “severed by a state party,” and the organization was forced to resort to a back-up plan to continue its work.

Fuente: Ecuador Cuts Internet Access for Julian Assange to Preserve Neutrality in U.S. Election


Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador

El secretario de Estado de EE.UU., John Kerry, pidió a ese país que evitara que el fundador de WikiLeaks divulgara información clasificada de la candidata demócrata a la Casa Blanca, sobre las negociaciones de paz entre el Gobierno colombiano y las FARC.

Fuente: Ecuador cortó internet en embajada donde está Assange – El Mostrador


If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

Journalists should always publish newsworthy information – even if its from a potentially biased source. This election should be no different

Fuente: If Trump leaks are OK and Clinton leaks aren’t, there’s a problem | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian

Newspaper criticised for calling for the criminal prosecution of its own source, on ‘whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize’

Fuente: Washington Post says Obama should not pardon whistleblower Ed Snowden | Media | The Guardian


New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose

Oliver Stone’s latest film, “Snowden,” bills itself as a dramatized version of the life of Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the global extent of U.S. surveillance capabilities.

Fuente: New Film Tells the Story of Edward Snowden; Here Are the Surveillance Programs He Helped Expose


“El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”

“La gestión de los Papeles de Panamá es un ataque a nuestro modelo”, asegura el fundador de Wikileaks, muy crítico con el Consorcio Internacional de Periodistas de Investigación que ha publicado esta última gran filtración”Los medios establecidos tienen que limitarse constantemente bajo los poderes del establishment, los poderes del Estado al que pertenecen”, dice Assange en esta entrevista con eldiario.es en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres

Fuente: “El Watergate es una ilusión diseñada por Hollywood”


Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian

A former Pentagon investigator has spoken on record to the Guardian about major privacy and security lapses within the government’s whistleblower program. John Crane, who for 25 years worked for the Department of Defense inspector general’s office, which helps federal employees expose abuse and corruption, says whistleblowers like Edward Snowden had little choice but to go outside the system. His revelations can now be made public for the first time

Fuente: Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video | World news | The Guardian


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived.Today, The Intercept is announcing two innovations in how we report on and publish these materials. Both measures are designed to ensure that reporting on the archive continues in as expeditious and informative a manner as possible, in accordance with the agreements we entered into with our source about how these materials would be disclosed, a framework that he, and we, have publicly described on numerous occasions.

Fuente: The Intercept Is Broadening Access to the Snowden Archive. Here’s Why


De Wikileaks a Mexicoleaks – horizontal

De Wikileaks a Mexicoleaks – horizontal.

Antonio Martínez Velázquez
La aparición de la plataforma Mexicoleaks plantea algunas preguntas acerca de su éxito como instrumento político. La experiencia de Wikileaks nos indica que los retos serán mayúsculos y que la coalición presentada deberá sortear la presión de sus enemigos.

Después de la filtración de cientos de miles de cables diplomáticos del Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos, Wikileaks llegó a la cúspide de su éxito. El modelo fue imaginado por Julian Assange en un oscuro ensayo escrito en el año 2006, en el que postula una suerte de teoría crítica del Estado y una solución al problema de dicha organización: el Estado es una conspiración sostenida por la comunicación secreta entre sus partes y para terminar con esta basta con exhibir el contenido de la conjura. Ocho años después de su puesta en operaciones, Wikileaks no puede declararse triunfador si la unidad de medida es la consecución de sus fines. Su éxito ha estado definido por oposición.


Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción

Citizenfour: no es ciencia ficción.

El documental de Laura Poitras cuenta los primeros momentos de la mayor filtración de espionaje de un Gobierno en la historia

La existencia de un segundo filtrador dentro de la NSA y el reencuentro de Snowden con su pareja en Moscú son las dos revelaciones del documental

La fecha de estreno en España está prevista para el 27 de marzo

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

Edward Snowden, en una de las imágenes del documental de Laura Poitras, Citizenfour.

La película de Laura Poitras es un documental imprescindible para entender esta nueva etapa de internet. Citizenfour es, primero, un documento histórico que recoge de primerísima mano el encuentro de Edward Snowden con los periodistas que le ayudaron a revelar al mundo el mayor espionaje masivo conocido; y después, una película inquietante, donde es la información y no la música la que nos hace darnos cuenta de que no estamos viendo ciencia ficción.

Como dice Snowden a un absorto Glenn Greenwald tras contarle cómo funciona XKeyscore, un programa de la NSA: “Esto ya está sucediendo”.


How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept

How to Leak to The Intercept – The Intercept.

Featured photo - How to Leak to The Intercept

People often tell reporters things their employers, or their government, want to keep suppressed. But leaking can serve the public interest, fueling revelatory and important journalism.

This publication was created in part as a platform for journalism arising from unauthorized disclosures by NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Our founders and editors are strongly committed to publishing stories based on leaked material when that material is newsworthy and serves the public interest. So ever since The Intercept launched, our staff has tried to put the best technology in place to protect our sources. Our website has been protected with HTTPS encryption from the beginning. All of our journalists publish their PGP keys on their staff profiles so that readers can send them encrypted email. And we’ve been running a SecureDrop server, an open source whistleblower submission system, to make it simpler and more secure for anonymous sources to get in touch with us.

But caution is still advised to those who want to communicate with us without exposing their real-world identities.


EE UU condena a un exagente de la CIA por revelar información clasificada | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU condena a un exagente de la CIA por revelar información clasificada | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


Jeffrey Sterling fue acusado de entregar a un periodista datos de un programa contra el sistema nuclear iraní

James Risen, el periodista del ‘Times’ que supuestamente recibió información secreta del agente. / BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (AFP)

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El triángulo lo forman un periodista del diario The New York Times, un exagente de los servicios de inteligencia y el Gobierno de Estados Unidos. En el centro, un programa de la CIA para sabotear el sistema nuclear de Irán. Es uno de los nueve casos en los que la Administración del presidente Barack Obama se ha querellado contra un espía por filtrar información a la prensa. Y ha vuelto a ganar.

Jeffrey Sterling fue condenado este lunes por nueve cargos que abarcan desde revelar información relativa a la “seguridad nacional” a James Risen, periodista y escritor del Times, hasta obstrucción a la justicia. El exagente, de 47 años, permanecerá en libertad hasta el 24 de abril, cuando conozca su sentencia, tras pasar los últimos cinco años intentando demostrar su inocencia.

El Fiscal General, Eric Holder, ha calificado la decisión del jurado en contra de Sterling como “justa y apropiada”. Según el responsable del Departamento de Justicia, “las filtraciones pusieron vidas en peligro y constituyeron una grave violación de la confianza depositada por los ciudadanos” en el agente.

El Gobierno ha asegurado durante el desarrollo de este caso que Sterling actuó por despecho tras ser despedido de la CIA en 2003. El exagente habría contactado con Risen para denunciar lo que consideraba un caso de discriminación laboral, aunque después acabó proporcionándole más información sobre el programa en el que había trabajado y que tenía como objetivo sabotear el sistema nuclear iraní.

El debate sobre la protección de reporteros ha llegado hasta el Congreso, donde se debatió la creación de una nueva ley ‘escudo’ para la prensa

El caso de Sterling cobró especial relevancia en EE UU por estar implicado un periodista del diario más importante del país y que declaró estar dispuesto a ingresar en prisión antes que revelar su fuente. Según el Gobierno, la persona de la que recibió datos para su libro ‘State of War’ siempre fue Sterling, quien no sólo dio detalles de las operaciones en las que estuvo implicado, sino que también puso en peligro a otros agentes.

La negativa de Risen reabrió además un debate entre los medios estadounidenses sobre la protección de sus periodistas en casos como éste. El Gobierno no se querelló contra el escritor, pero sí le exigió que revelara su fuente. A pesar de que el derecho a la confidencialidad sobre el origen de la información está reconocido en varios países e instituciones internacionales, el Gobierno federal de EE UU no lo estipula, por lo que Risen podía haber ido a prisión.


GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media | UK news | The Guardian.

 

• Snowden files reveal emails of BBC, NY Times and more
• Agency includes investigative journalists on ‘threat’ list
• Editors call on Cameron to act against snooping on media

 

GCHQ
The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by GCHQ. Photograph: GCHQ/EPA

GCHQ’s bulk surveillance of electronic communications has scooped up emails to and from journalists working for some of the US and UK’s largest media organisations, analysis of documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Emails from the BBC, Reuters, the Guardian, the New York Times, Le Monde, the Sun, NBC and the Washington Post were saved by GCHQ and shared on the agency’s intranet as part of a test exercise by the signals intelligence agency.

The disclosure comes as the British government faces intense pressure to protect the confidential communications of reporters, MPs and lawyers from snooping.

The journalists’ communications were among 70,000 emails harvested in the space of less than 10 minutes on one day in November 2008 by one of GCHQ’s numerous taps on the fibre-optic cables that make up the backbone of the internet.

The communications, which were sometimes simple mass-PR emails sent to dozens of journalists but also included correspondence between reporters and editors discussing stories, were retained by GCHQ and were available to all cleared staff on the agency intranet. There is nothing to indicate whether or not the journalists were intentionally targeted.

The mails appeared to have been captured and stored as the output of a then-new tool being used to strip irrelevant data out of the agency’s tapping process.

New evidence from other UK intelligence documents revealed by Snowden also shows that a GCHQ information security assessment listed “investigative journalists” as a threat in a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers.


Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept

Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism – The Intercept.

BY NATASHA VARGAS-COOPER 

Featured photo - Sony Hack: Clooney Says Movie is about Snowden, Not Journalism

As curious journalists, tabloid writers, and Hollywood watchers pore over the massive trove of hacked Sony data, the public is being given a rare glimpse into the complicated world of Hollywood and politics. Tucked between bitchy emails about Angelina Jolie and snarky comments on Will Smith’s family are details of a chummy relationship between Sony executives and the CIA, as well as rare insight into how Hollywood views potential movies about NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Sony’s plan to make a Snowden movie got rolling in January 2014, when Elizabeth Cantillon, then an executive producer at Sony, sentcompany Co-Chairman Amy Pascal an email saying she had successfully closed on the rights to the book, “No Place to Hide,” by The Intercept‘s founding editor, Glenn Greenwald.  “[Y]ou will be my Oscar date,” Cantillon promised Pascal.

In March of 2014, Sony officially optioned the rights to Greenwald’s book, which chronicles how he broke the Snowden story, and moved forward with plans for a movie.


Laura Poitras: "Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo"

Laura Poitras: “Sé que estaré bajo el radar de las agencias de inteligencia de todo el mundo”.

La documentalista que ayudó a Snowden presenta su documental en Europa, ‘Citizenfour’, donde muestra cómo fue la preparación de la mayor filtración de la historia

“Snowden no está cooperando o trabajando para ninguna otra agencia de inteligencia, eso es simplemente una historia creada por el Gobierno”, asegura la periodista, elegida por el propio extrabajador de la NSA para hacer pública su filtración

“Lo que Glenn y yo publicamos ahora con Snowden cuestiona directamente el liderazgo de Obama”

 

 

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

Laura Poitras, documentalista que ayudó a Edward Snowden. Foto cedida por su agente (PRAXIS FILMS)

 

 

A estas alturas de la película, ¿quién no sabe quién es Edward Snowden? Su denuncia sobre los sistemas de espionaje masivo e indiscriminado utilizados por la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA) contra gobiernos, corporaciones y hasta sus propios ciudadanos ha pasado ya a la historia como la mayor filtración de un trabajador de los servicios de inteligencia jamás publicada. Y si a alguien hemos de dar gracias por ello –además de al joven informático– es a Laura Poitras, documentalista estadounidense afincada en Berlín, a quien Citizenfour eligió para hacer pública su historia “sin importar lo que le pasara a él”. Ella, arriesgando también su vida, así lo hizo.


WikiLeaks reveals Australian gagging order over political bribery allegations | World news | The Guardian

WikiLeaks reveals Australian gagging order over political bribery allegations | World news | The Guardian.

Superinjunction reported to have been issued on 19 June to block reporting of claims involving international politicians
WikiLeaks screensaver

In a statement published with the leak, Julian Assange, Wikileaks founder, said the gagging order relates to a case that “concerns the subsidiaries of the Australian central bank”. Photograph: Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

A sweeping gagging order issued in Australia to block reporting of any bribery allegations involving several international political leaders in the region has been exposed by WikiLeaks.

The prohibition emerged from a criminal case in the Australian courts and applies throughout the country. It was issued by the criminal division of the supreme court of Victoria in Melbourne “to prevent damage to Australia’s international relations that may be caused by the publication of material that may damage the reputations of specified individuals who are not the subject of charges in these proceedings”.

The Australia-wide gagging order is a superinjunction, which means it also contains a clause insisting that the terms of the order itself should remain secret. It was issued on 19 June and states: “Subject to further order, there be no disclosure, by publication or otherwise, of any information (whether in electronic or paper form) derived from or prepared for the purposes of these proceedings including the terms of these orders.”

In a statement published with the leak, Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, said the gagging order relates to a case that “concerns the subsidiaries of the Australian central bank”.

He said it was the first blanket suppression order of this nature in Australia since 1995. “With this order, the worst in living memory, the Australian government is not just gagging the Australian press, it is blindfolding the Australian public,” said Assange, who is himself Australian. “This is not simply a question of the Australian government failing to give this international corruption case the public scrutiny it is due. Foreign minister Julie Bishop must explain why she is threatening every Australian with imprisonment in an attempt to cover up an embarrassing corruption scandal involving the Australian government. The concept of ‘national security’ is not meant to serve as a blanket phrase to cover up serious corruption allegations involving government officials, in Australia or elsewhere. It is in the public interest for the press to be able to report on this case.”


I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian

I, spy: Edward Snowden in exile | World | The Guardian.

Fiction and films, the nearest most of us knowingly get to the world of espionage, give us a series of reliable stereotypes. British spies are hard-bitten, libidinous he-men. Russian agents are thickset, low-browed and facially scarred. And defectors end up as tragic old soaks in Moscow, scanning old copies of the Times for news of the Test match.

Such a fate was anticipated for Edward Snowden by Michael Hayden, a former NSA and CIA chief, who predicted last September that the former NSA analyst would be stranded in Moscow for the rest of his days – “isolated, bored, lonely, depressed… and alcoholic”.

But the Edward Snowden who materialises in our hotel room shortly after noon on the appointed day seems none of those things. A year into his exile in Moscow, he feels less, not more, isolated. If he is depressed, he doesn’t show it. And, at the end of seven hours of conversation, he refuses a beer. “I actually don’t drink.” He smiles when repeating Hayden’s jibe. “I was like, wow, their intelligence is worse than I thought.”

Oliver Stone, who is working on a film about the man now standing in room 615 of the Golden Apple hotel on Moscow’s Malaya Dmitrovka, might struggle to make his subject live up to the canon of great movie spies. The American director has visited Snowden in Moscow, and wants to portray him as an out-and-out hero, but he is an unconventional one: quiet, disciplined, unshowy, almost academic in his speech. If Snowden has vices – and God knows they must have been looking for them – none has emerged in the 13 months since he slipped away from his life as a contracted NSA analyst in Hawaii, intent on sharing the biggest cache of top-secret material the world has ever seen.

Since arriving in Moscow, Snowden has been keeping late and solitary hours – effectively living on US time, tapping away on one of his three computers (three to be safe; he uses encrypted chat, too). If anything, he appears more connected and outgoing than he could be in his former life as an agent. Of his life now, he says, “There’s actually not that much difference. You know, I think there are guys who are just hoping to see me sad. And they’re going to continue to be disappointed.”

When the Guardian first spoke to Snowden a year ago in Hong Kong, he had been dishevelled, his hair uncombed, wearing jeans and a T-shirt. The 31-year-old who materialised last week was smartly, if anonymously, dressed in black trousers and grey jacket, his hair tidily cut. He is jockey-light – even skinnier than a year ago. And he looks pale: “Probably three steps from death,” he jokes. “I mean, I don’t eat a whole lot. I keep a weird schedule. I used to be very active, but just in the recent period I’ve had too much work to focus on.”

 Edward Snowden – video interview

There was no advance warning of where we would meet: his only US television interview, with NBC’s Brian Williams in May, was conducted in an anonymous hotel room of Snowden’s choosing. This time, he prefers to come to us. On his arrival, there is a warm handshake for Guardian reporter Ewen MacAskill, whom he last saw in Hong Kong – a Sunday night after a week of intense work in a frowsty hotel room, a few hours before the video revealing his identity to the world went public. Neither man knew if they would ever meet again.

Snowden orders chicken curry from room service and, as he forks it down, is immediately into the finer points of the story that yanked him from a life of undercover anonymity to global fame. The Snowden-as-alcoholic jibe is not the only moment when he reflects wryly on his former colleagues’ patchy ability to get on top of events over the past year. There was, for instance, the incident last July when a plane carrying President Evo Morales back to Bolivia from Moscow was forced down in Vienna and searched for a stowaway Snowden. “I was like, first off, wow, their intelligence sucks, from listening to everything. But, two, are they really going to the point of just completely humiliating the president of a Latin American nation, the representative of so many people? It was just shockingly poorly thought out, and yet they did it anyway, and they keep at these sort of mistakes.” It was as if they were trying not to find him. “I almost felt like I had some sort of friend in government.”


Sarah Harrison: "No poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra"

Sarah Harrison: “No poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra”.

La periodista de  Wikileaks acusa a EEUU y sus aliados de haber de haber iniciado una batalla contra Wikileaks que demuestra realmente que la organización es una amenaza para “los secretos que quieren mantener ocultos”.

“Cometimos un error al editar demasiado los diarios de guerra de Irak, prácticamente se convirtieron en ilegibles, pero aprendimos la lección de que el discurso del gobierno de EEUU sobre la seguridad nacional es una estafa”.

 

 

Sarah Harrison. Foto: Deutsche Welle

Sarah Harrison. Foto: Deutsche Welle

 

Sarah Harrison, periodista de investigación en Wikileaks, fue una de las acompañantes de Edward Snowden en su vuelo de Hong Kong a Moscú en junio de 2013. Una vez en la capital rusa, pasó 39 días con él en la zona de tránsito del aeropuerto, asistiéndole en el proceso legal de solicitud de asilo a diversos países.

Tras conseguir el asilo temporal en el país ruso permaneció con el exempleado de la CIA y la NSA durante otros tres meses. Este contacto con el protagonista del Cablegate y su trabajo dentro de la perseguida plataforma de filtración de documentos, le han convertido en uno de los múltiples objetivos de lo que ella misma denomina el “poder incalculable” de un enorme “entramado global de inteligencia, diplomático y militar”, creado por Estados Unidos y sus aliados con el fin de ver y controlarlo todo.

Ciberespionaje, escuchas telefónicas indiscriminadas, intervenciones de cables diplomáticos… “Wikileaks ha hecho mucho por exponer este sistema de control globalizado” y por ello Estados Unidos va con “todo su poder” tras ellos, explica Harrison durante su intervención en el Global Media Forum organizado por la cadena pública alemana Deutsche Welle y celebrado en Bonn. Y sobre todo a exponerlo de una forma en la que el poder de decisión sobre la historia no reside únicamente en un periodista sino en el público.

“Algunas de las mejores historias de Wikileaks han salido del propio público, consultando ellos mismos los documentos publicados e incluso utilizándolos en sus propias causas legales en ocasiones. Precisamente, la capacidad de dar poder a la gente y el hecho de no poder negar la verdad es lo que más les aterra”.

Y en su empeño por controlar estas incontrolables fuentes de información, Estados Unidos no duda en tomar “múltiples y extraordinarias medidas, como reunir a sus aliados europeos y obligar al avión del presidente de un país a aterrizar violando leyes internacionales. Han iniciado un bloqueo financiero contra nosotros –se han descubierto conversaciones de Mastercard con el FBI— y de repente ya nadie puede hacernos donaciones, mientras por ejemplo se puede seguir donando al Ku Klux Klan. Así que sí, debemos ser peligrosos”, ironiza.


Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Dos años de Assange en 20 m 2 | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Se cumplen 24 meses de la entrada del ‘exhacker’ en la Embajada ecuatoriana en Londres

 

/ Londres / Quito 18 JUN 2014 – 21:40 CET

 

Assange, en una comparecencia desde la embajada, en 2012. / LEON NEAL (AFP)

 

El pulso político y diplomático que encarna el fundador de Wikileaks, Julian Assange, permanece enquistado cuando se cumplen este jueves dos años de su entrada en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres, donde sigue refugiado bajo riesgo de ser arrestado si pone un pie fuera del recinto. Mientras el Gobierno ecuatoriano sostiene que el exhacker, que la fiscalía sueca quiere interrogar por posibles delitos sexuales, “no es un fugitivo” sino un asilado bajo su amparo, las autoridades británicas persisten en su empeño de detenerlo por haber violado los términos de la libertad condicional aquel 19 de junio de 2012, y mantienen un cerco policial en torno a la legación cuya factura ya roza los seis millones de libras.

 

En todas las entrevistas hechas a Assange, durante los dos años que lleva en el recinto diplomático, ha habido una pregunta constante. ¿Cómo es vivir en una embajada? Sus respuestas han permitido conocer que pasa los días confinado en una oficina de 20 metros cuadrados convertida en habitación. En ese espacio trabaja (jornadas de 17 horas frente a un ordenador), se ejercita (en una cinta para correr que le regaló el cineasta Ken Loach) y recibe visitas, según los reportes del periódico británico The Daily Mail en 2012. Por declaraciones de uno de sus abogados, Baltasar Garzón, se sabe que su mobiliario incluye una cama, una mesa, una estantería y ahí se acaba su mundo.

 

El propio australiano comparecerá en una rueda de prensa en conexión internauta este jueves con el ministro de Exteriores ecuatoriano, Ricardo Patiño, según este anunció su cuenta de Twitter sin precisar más detalles.


Guardian launches SecureDrop system for whistleblowers to share files | Technology | theguardian.com

Guardian launches SecureDrop system for whistleblowers to share files | Technology | theguardian.com.

SecureDrop platform allows sources to submit documents and data while avoiding most common forms of online tracking

SecureDrop
SecureDrop makes use of well-known anonymising technology such as the Tor network and the Tails operating system

The Guardian has launched a secure platform for whistleblowers to securely submit confidential documents to the newspaper’s reporters.

The launch comes a year to the day since the Guardian posted the first of a series of NSA documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, sparking a worldwide debate on surveillance, privacy, and civil liberties.

Free speech and privacy groups alongside popular sites including Reddit, BoingBoing and Imgur, are marking the day with a Reset the Net campaign, encouraging internet users to take direct action to secure their privacy online. Several technology companies are also expected to announce new steps to protect users’ privacy over the course of the day.

The SecureDrop open-source whistleblowing platform provides a way for sources, who can choose to remain anonymous, to submit documents and data while avoiding virtually all of the most common forms of online tracking.

It makes use of well-known anonymising technology such as the Tor network and the Tails operating system, which was used by journalists working on the Snowden files.


Pentagon report: scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden 'staggering' | World news | theguardian.com

Pentagon report: scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden ‘staggering’ | World news | theguardian.com.

• Classified assessment describes impact of leaks as ‘grave’
• Report does not include specific detail to support conclusions
• 12 of 39 heavily redacted pages released after Foia request

Read the full Defense Intelligence Agency report

 

 

Edward Snowden Meets With German Green Party MP Hans-Christian Stroebele In Moscow
The DIA report has been cited numerous times by politicians who claimed Snowden’s leaks have put US personnel at risk. Photograph: Sunshine Press/Getty

 

A top-secret Pentagon report to assess the damage to national security from the leak of classified National Security Agency documents by Edward Snowden concluded that “the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering”.

The Guardian has obtained a copy of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s classified damage assessment in response to a Freedom of Information Act (Foia) lawsuit filed against the Defense Department earlier this year. The heavily redacted 39-page report was prepared in December and is titled “DoD Information Review Task Force-2: Initial Assessment, Impacts Resulting from the Compromise of Classified Material by a Former NSA Contractor.”

But while the DIA report describes the damage to US intelligence capabilities as “grave”, the government still refuses to release any specific details to support this conclusion. The entire impact assessment was redacted from the material released to the Guardian under a presidential order that protects classified information and several other Foia exemptions.

Only 12 pages of the report were declassified by DIA and released. A Justice Department attorney said DIA would continue to process other internal documents that refer to the DIA report for possible release later this year.

Steven Aftergood, director of the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists, questioned the decision to withhold specific details.

“The essence of the report is contained in the statement that ‘the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering’. But all elaboration of what this striking statement means has been withheld,” he said.


Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters – The Intercept

Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters – The Intercept.

By 810
Featured photo - Keith Alexander Unplugged: on Bush/Obama, 1.7 million stolen documents and other matters Photo credit: Evan Vucci/AP

The just-retired long-time NSA chief, Gen. Keith Alexander, recently traveled to Australia to give a remarkably long and wide-ranging interview with an extremely sycophantic “interviewer” with The Australian Financial Review. The resulting 17,000-word transcript and accompanying article form a model of uncritical stenography journalism, but Alexander clearly chose to do this because he is angry, resentful, and feeling unfairly treated, and the result is a pile of quotes that are worth examining, only a few of which are noted below:

AFR: What were the key differences for you as director of NSA serving under presidents Bush and Obama? Did you have a preferred commander in chief?

Gen. Alexander: Obviously they come from different parties, they view things differently, but when it comes to the security of the nation and making those decisions about how to protect our nation, what we need to do to defend it, they are, ironically, very close to the same point. You would get almost the same decision from both of them on key questions about how to defend our nation from terrorists and other threats.

The almost-complete continuity between George W. Bush and Barack Obama on such matters has been explained by far too many senior officials in both parties, and has been amply documented in far too many venues, to make it newsworthy when it happens again. Still, the fact that one of the nation’s most powerful generals in history, who has no incentive to say it unless it were true, just comes right out and states that Bush and The Candidate of Change are “very close to the same point” and “you would get almost the same decision from both of them on key questions” is a fine commentary on a number of things, including how adept the 2008 Obama team was at the art of branding.

The fact that Obama, in 2008, specifically vowed to his followers angered over his campaign-season NSA reversal that he possessed “the firm intention — once I’m sworn in as president — to have my Attorney General conduct a comprehensive review of all our surveillance programs, and to make further recommendations on any steps needed to preserve civil liberties and to prevent executive branch abuse in the future” only makes that point a bit more vivid.


El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El día que Snowden se presentó al mundo | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Glenn Greenwald relata en su libro cuando Snowden pensaba que había sido descubierto


Glenn Greenwald, el 10 de junio de 2013, mientras atendía a los periodistas en su hotel de Hong Kong. / VINCENT YU (AP)

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El jueves [6 de junio], ya el quinto día en Hong Kong, fui a la habitación de hotel de Snowden, quien enseguida me dijo que tenía noticias “algo alarmantes”. Un dispositivo de seguridad conectado a Internet que compartía con su novia de toda la vida había detectado que dos personas de la NSA —alguien de recursos humanos y un “policía” de la agencia— habían acudido a su casa buscándole a él.

Para Snowden eso significaba casi con seguridad que la NSA [Agencia Nacional de Seguridad de EE UU] lo había identificado como la probable fuente de las filtraciones, pero yo me mostré escéptico. “Si creyeran que tú has hecho esto, mandarían hordas de agentes del FBI y seguramente unidades de élite, no un simple agente y una persona de recursos humanos”. Supuse que se trataba de una indagación automática y rutinaria, justificada por el hecho de que un empleado de la NSA se ausenta durante varias semanas sin dar explicaciones. Sin embargo, Snowden sugería que habían mandado gente de perfil bajo adrede para no llamar la atención de los medios ni desencadenar la eliminación de pruebas.

“En Guantánamo me pido la litera de abajo”, bromeó Snowden mientras meditaba sobre la estrategia a seguir

Al margen del significado de la noticia, recalqué la necesidad de preparar rápidamente el artículo y el vídeo en el que Snowden se daba a conocer como la fuente de las revelaciones. Estábamos decididos a que el mundo supiera de Snowden, de sus acciones y sus motivaciones, por el propio Snowden, no a través de una campaña de demonización lanzada por el Gobierno norteamericano mientras él estaba escondido o bajo custodia o era incapaz de hablar por sí mismo..


Guardian's Edward Snowden revelations receive backing in poll | Media | theguardian.com

Guardian’s Edward Snowden revelations receive backing in poll | Media | theguardian.com.

YouGov finds 37% of the British people thought it right to publish while 22% thought it wrong

 

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden: a majority of Britons back the Guardian’s reporting. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

 

A public opinion poll has found that more Britons think it was right for the Guardian to publish Edward Snowden‘s NSA leaks about surveillance than think it was wrong that the paper did so.

According to the YouGov poll, 37% of the British people thought it right to publish while 22% thought it wrong. Asked whether it was good or bad for society, 46% considered it good against 22% who regarded it as bad.


‘The Guardian’ y el ‘Post’ ganan el Pulitzer por las revelaciones de Snowden | Sociedad | EL PAÍS

‘The Guardian’ y el ‘Post’ ganan el Pulitzer por las revelaciones de Snowden | Sociedad | EL PAÍS.

 

 

El diario británico The Guardian ha obtenido su primer premio Pulitzer gracias al trabajo de Glenn Greenwald y Laura Poitras, los dos periodistas que publicaron los documentos filtrados por el exagente de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad (NSA), Edward Snowden. La exclusiva, compartida inicialmente con el diario The Washington Post está considerada como una de las noticias más importantes de los últimos años y ha consolidado la influencia de The Guardian en el sector mediático estadounidense.

 

El jurado destacó, en el caso de The Washington Post, que su exclusiva “ayudó a los ciudadanos a entender cómo las revelaciones encajan en el marco de la seguridad nacional”. Sobre el británico The Guardian, subrayó que su contribución “provocó, gracias a una investigación agresiva, la apertura de un debate sobre la relación entre el Gobierno y los ciudadanos en asuntos de seguridad y privacidad”.


How Edward Snowden went from loyal NSA contractor to whistleblower | World news | The Guardian

How Edward Snowden went from loyal NSA contractor to whistleblower | World news | The Guardian.

He was politically conservative, a gun owner, a geek – and the man behind the biggest intelligence leak in history. In this exclusive extract from his new book, Luke Harding looks at Edward Snowden’s journey from patriot to America’s most wanted
Edward Snowden illustrationView larger picture

Click for full picture. Image by Kyle Bean for the Guardian

In late December 2001, someone calling themselves TheTrueHOOHA had a question. He was an 18-year-old American male with impressive IT skills and a sharp intelligence. His real identity was unknown. Everyone who posted on Ars Technica, a popular technology website, did so anonymously.

  1. The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man
  2. by Luke Harding
  1. Tell us what you think:Star-rate and review this book

TheTrueHOOHA wanted to set up his own web server. It was a Saturday morning, a little after 11am. He posted: “It’s my first time. Be gentle. Here’s my dilemma: I want to be my own host. What do I need?”

Soon, regular users were piling in with helpful suggestions. TheTrueHOOHA replied: “Ah, the vast treasury of geek knowledge that is Ars.” He would become a prolific contributor; over the next eight years, he authored nearly 800 comments. He described himself variously as “unemployed”, a failed soldier, a “systems editor”, and someone who had US State Department security clearance.

His home was on the east coast of America in the state of Maryland, near Washington DC. But by his mid-20s he was already an international man of mystery. He popped up in Europe – in Geneva, London, Ireland, Italy and Bosnia. He travelled to India. Despite having no degree, he knew an astonishing amount about computers. His politics appeared staunchly Republican. He believed strongly in personal liberty, defending, for example, Australians who farmed cannabis plants.

At times he could be rather obnoxious. He called one fellow-Arsian, for example, a “cock”; others who disagreed with his sink-or-swim views on social security were “fucking retards”.

His chat logs cover a colourful array of themes: gaming, girls, sex, Japan, the stock market, his disastrous stint in the US army, his negative impressions of multiracial Britain (he was shocked by the number of “Muslims” in east London and wrote, “I thought I had gotten off of the plane in the wrong country… it was terrifying”), the joys of gun ownership (“I have a Walther P22. It’s my only gun but I love it to death,” he wrote in 2006). In their own way, the logs form a Bildungsroman.

Then, in 2009, the entries fizzle away. In February 2010, TheTrueHOOHA mentions a thing that troubles him: pervasive government surveillance. “Society really seems to have developed an unquestioning obedience towards spooky types… Did we get to where we are today via a slippery slope that was entirely within our control to stop? Or was it a relatively instantaneous sea change that sneaked in undetected because of pervasive government secrecy?”

TheTrueHOOHA’s last post is on 21 May 2012. After that, he disappears, a lost electronic signature amid the vastness of cyberspace. He was, we now know, Edward Snowden.


What now for the surveillance state? | World news | The Guardian

What now for the surveillance state? | World news | The Guardian.

Even GCHQ and the NSA know their work may not be sustainable without a proper debate about their power

 

Illustration of people on connected devices

GCHQ and the NSA potentially know everything about us, but we know virtually nothing about them. Illustration: Laurent Cilluffo

 

To most visitors, Cheltenham is a charming spa town on the edge of the Cotswolds. They admire its handsome regency terraces, visit its racecourse and throng to a thriving festival scene. Less visibly, Cheltenham is also a company town built around one industry: spying.

The Government Communications Headquarters seems to be very good at what it does. Its 6,400 employees include many bright computer engineers who work tirelessly to invent ever more imaginative ways to collect vast amounts of data on hundreds of millions of people.

Some find what they do reassuring, others menacing. As for the people who work at GCHQ, they have found themselves, for the first time, under intense scrutiny. This is, to put it mildly, unwelcome to them. They would like it to stop – and they have friends in politics, the law and even the press who agree.

According to those who study such things for a living, we live in a golden age of surveillance. The mobile phones we carry around betray us – our movements, our search terms, our health, our intentions, our friends, our emails, our texts. A bland name for it is “metadata“. But, as one former lawyer with the US National Security Agency told me: “Metadata absolutely tells you everything about somebody’s life.”

GCHQ is, along with the NSA, a world leader. Over the past five years GCHQ’s access to what they call “light” (a sweeter name for metadata) has increased by 7,000%, according to documents leaked by the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The amount of material being analysed or processed is up by 3,000%. That’s a lot of light.

Some accuse GCHQ of being little more than the Cheltenham branch office of the NSA. This may be unfair, but Whitehall officials concede that there is a high degree of co-operation and sharing between the two agencies. One of Cheltenham’s senior legal advisers put the possible attraction for their American counterparts this way: “We have a light oversight regime compared with the US.”

GCHQ, which receives tens of millions of pounds from the NSA every year, used, in some minds, to be the Cinderella of the intelligence world. The public imagination was more easily captured by James Bond, George Smiley and the cold war pitting of agent against agent.

It’s now clear that GCHQ and the NSA have risen without trace to the top of the intelligence pecking order. Increasingly an asymmetry has developed: they potentially know virtually everything about us, but we know virtually nothing about them.

This raises three questions. First, is it right that they are able to master all civil and commercial forms of communication in order to collect, store and analyse information about entire populations? Who knew?

Secondly, is it right that we should know so little about who they are or what they do – that this dramatic loss of individual privacy, unprecedented in history, could be done without any kind of public knowledge or consent? Who agreed?

Finally, is this new infrastructure sustainable?


erktheerk comenta en NSALeaks as of 10/22/13 Chronological order

erktheerk comenta en NSALeaks as of 10/22/13 Chronological order.

  • Friday 04 October 2013

‘Peeling back the layers of Tor with EgotisticalGiraffe’

  • Thursday 03 October 2013

Lavabit founder reveals that the FBI demanded access to over 400,000 email accounts, not just Snowden’s, prompting the company’s closure

  • Thursday 03 October 2013

The Snowden files: why the British public should be worried about GCHQ; Britain is sliding towards an entirely new kind of surveillance society

  • Thursday 03 October 2013

NEWSNIGHT: Glenn Greenwald full interview on Snowden, NSA, GCHQ and spying – [14:09]

  • Thursday 03 October 2013

NSA Experiment Traced U.S. Cellphone Locations; in 2010 and 2011 conducted a secret pilot project to test the collection of bulk data about the location of Americans’ cellphones

  • Monday 30 September 2013

NSA stores metadata of millions of web users for up to a year, secret files show; vast amounts of data kept in repository codenamed Marina; data retained regardless of whether person is NSA target


Periodista que destapó caso Snowden anuncia “nuevos bombazos” sobre espionaje de EEUU en Latinoamérica – El Mostrador

Periodista que destapó caso Snowden anuncia “nuevos bombazos” sobre espionaje de EEUU en Latinoamérica – El Mostrador.

El principal contacto del ex técnico de la CIA además abogó por un periodismo centrado en exponer los excesos de los gobiernos.

Espionaje periodismo

El periodista Glenn Greenwald, principal contacto del ex técnico de la CIA Edward Snowden, prometió que habrá más “bombazos” sobre el espionaje de EE.UU. en Latinoamérica y abogó por un periodismo centrado en exponer los excesos de los gobiernos, en la cuarta jornada de la Asamblea General de la SIP.

Tras una sesión matutina centrada en el debate sobre la legalización de la marihuana, la asamblea de la Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa (SIP), que se celebra desde el viernes en Denver (Colorado), abordó las revelaciones sobre el espionaje a escala global de EE.UU. con la intervención de Greenwald.

En una conferencia telefónica desde Brasil, donde reside, Greenwald aseguró que “la mayoría” de los archivos que Snowden se llevó consigo en su huida desde EE.UU. a Hong Kong y después a Rusia “están aún sin publicar”, y confió en que saldrán a la luz pronto.

“Puedo prometer, absolutamente, que habrá muchas más noticias al menos tan significativas como las que ya han salido”, dijo el periodista, que ha cooperado con Snowden para verificar y publicar la gran mayoría de sus documentos sobre el espionaje estadounidense.

Preguntado por si aún quedan “bombazos” por revelar sobre las actividades de la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad estadounidense (NSA) en Latinoamérica, Greenwald respondió con un “por supuesto”.


Fundador de eBay financiará proyecto del periodista de caso Snowden – BioBioChile

Fundador de eBay financiará proyecto del periodista de caso Snowden – BioBioChile.

 

Pierre Omidyar | OnInnovation (CC) – FlickrPierre Omidyar | OnInnovation (CC) – Flickr
Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

El fundador de eBay, Pierre Omidyar anunció este miércoles que financiará el nuevo medio del periodista Glenn Greenwald, quien contribuyó a publicar las revelaciones sobre el vasto sistema de espionaje estadounidense, con el objetivo de “buscar la verdad”.

Nacido en Francia, el multimillonario irano-estadounidense quiere “preservar y reforzar el papel que juega el periodismo en la sociedad”, explicó en un comunicado, confirmando su asociación con el periodista que reveló el programa de inteligencia filtrado por el ex consultor estadounidense Edward Snowden.

Instalado en Rio, Greenwald había anunciado el martes que renunciaba a su puesto en el medio británico The Guardian para crear uno nuevo “de gran alcance”, que cubrirá tanto deportes como cultura, dando particular atención a la política.

El proyecto deberá “apoyar (a los periodistas) y permitirles buscar la verdad”, precisó el fundador de eBay, que figura entre las 50 mayores fortunas estadounidenses.

En su comunicado, Omidyar afirma igualmente compartir “muchas ideas” con Greenwald, partidario de la transparencia y gran defensor de las libertades civiles. “Decidimos unir nuestras fuerzas”, reiteró.


Seymour Hersh on Obama, NSA and the 'pathetic' American media | Media | theguardian.com

Seymour Hersh on Obama, NSA and the ‘pathetic’ American media | Media | theguardian.com.

Pulitzer Prize winner explains how to fix journalism, saying press should ‘fire 90% of editors and promote ones you can’t control’

Seymour Hersh

Seymour Hersh exposed the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam war, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. Photograph: Wally McNamee/Corbis

Seymour Hersh has got some extreme ideas on how to fix journalism – close down the news bureaus of NBC and ABC, sack 90% of editors in publishing and get back to the fundamental job of journalists which, he says, is to be an outsider.

It doesn’t take much to fire up Hersh, the investigative journalist who has been the nemesis of US presidents since the 1960s and who was once described by the Republican party as “the closest thing American journalism has to a terrorist”.

He is angry about the timidity of journalists in America, their failure to challenge the White House and be an unpopular messenger of truth.

Snowden changed the debate on surveillance

He is certain that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden “changed the whole nature of the debate” about surveillance. Hersh says he and other journalists had written about surveillance, but Snowden was significant because he provided documentary evidence – although he is sceptical about whether the revelations will change the US government’s policy.

“Duncan Campbell [the British investigative journalist who broke the Zircon cover-up story], James Bamford [US journalist] and Julian Assange and me and the New Yorker, we’ve all written the notion there’s constant surveillance, but he [Snowden] produced a document and that changed the whole nature of the debate, it’s real now,” Hersh says.

“Editors love documents. Chicken-shit editors who wouldn’t touch stories like that, they love documents, so he changed the whole ball game,” he adds, before qualifying his remarks.


Various items: NSA stories around the world | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Various items: NSA stories around the world | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Revelations continue to produce outcomes on multiple levels in numerous countries around the world

(updated below)

I’m still working at trying to get the next set of NSA stories published. That, combined with a rapidly approaching book deadline, will make non-NSA-article postings difficult for the next couple of weeks. Until then, here are a few items to note regarding a point I have often tried to make: namely, one of the most overlooked aspects of the NSA reporting in the US has been just how global of a story this has become:


Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

GCHQ

GCHQ’s headquarters on the outskirts of Cheltenham. Photograph: Barry Batchelor/PA

(Updated below)

The Independent this morning published an article – which it repeatedly claims comes from “documents obtained from the NSA by Edward Snowden” – disclosing that “Britain runs a secret internet-monitoring station in the Middle East to intercept and process vast quantities of emails, telephone calls and web traffic on behalf of Western intelligence agencies.” This is the first time the Independent has published any revelations purportedly from the NSA documents, and it’s the type of disclosure which journalists working directly with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have thus far avoided.

That leads to the obvious question: who is the source for this disclosure? Snowden this morning said he wants it to be clear that he was not the source for the Independent, stating:

I have never spoken with, worked with, or provided any journalistic materials to the Independent. The journalists I have worked with have, at my request, been judicious and careful in ensuring that the only things disclosed are what the public should know but that does not place any person in danger. People at all levels of society up to and including the President of the United States have recognized the contribution of these careful disclosures to a necessary public debate, and we are proud of this record.

“It appears that the UK government is now seeking to create an appearance that the Guardian and Washington Post’s disclosures are harmful, and they are doing so by intentionally leaking harmful information to The Independent and attributing it to others. The UK government should explain the reasoning behind this decision to disclose information that, were it released by a private citizen, they would argue is a criminal act.”


Exclusive: UK’s secret Mid-East internet surveillance base is revealed in Edward Snowden leaks – UK Politics – UK – The Independent

Exclusive: UK’s secret Mid-East internet surveillance base is revealed in Edward Snowden leaks – UK Politics – UK – The Independent.

 

 

Related articles

Britain runs a secret internet-monitoring station in the Middle East to intercept and process vast quantities of emails, telephone calls and web traffic on behalf of Western intelligence agencies, The Independent has learnt.

The station is able to tap into and extract data from the underwater fibre-optic cables passing through the region.

The information is then processed for intelligence and passed to GCHQ in Cheltenham and shared with the National Security Agency (NSA) in the United States. The Government claims the station is a key element in the West’s “war on terror” and provides a vital “early warning” system for potential attacks around the world.

The Independent is not revealing the precise location of the station but information on its activities was contained in the leaked documents obtained from the NSA by Edward Snowden. The Guardian newspaper’s reporting on these documents in recent months has sparked a dispute with the Government, with GCHQ security experts overseeing the destruction of hard drives containing the data.