Instagram es la red social más dañina para la salud mental de los adolescentes – El Mostrador

“Los jóvenes que pasan más de dos horas al día en redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter o Instagram son más propensos a sufrir problemas de salud mental, sobre todo angustia y síntomas de ansiedad y depresión”, informa el estudio realizado por la Royal Society of Public Healt y la Universidad de Cambridge.

Fuente: Instagram es la red social más dañina para la salud mental de los adolescentes – El Mostrador


Las empresas que prometen curarte de tu adicción a las redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter o Snapchat (y cómo lo hacen) – El Mostrador

Si no puedes alejarte de Facebook, Twitter o Snapchat no estás solo. Estas compañías ofrecen diferentes terapias para superar una adicción que algunos califican de “peor” a la del tabaco o al alcohol.

Fuente: Las empresas que prometen curarte de tu adicción a las redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter o Snapchat (y cómo lo hacen) – El Mostrador


La red social para madres donde los niños solo son la excusa | Verne EL PAÍS

La red social para madres donde los niños solo son la excusa | Verne EL PAÍS.


Unos dos millones de personas visitan cada mes Charhadas, una plataforma para compartir consejos y consultar dudas sobre la maternidad

Una madre intenta ordenar el salón con la excasa colaboración de su hija
Una madre intenta ordenar el salón con la excasa colaboración de su hija

 

Carmen Escalona y Belén Martí Junco aglutinan desde 2009 los consejos de madres para madres que se pierden en la maraña de internet y de la memoria. El contenedor tiene forma de red social y se llama Charhadas. A este espacio acuden cada mes dos millones de usuarios en busca de la solución a los piojos, la tienda donde comprar leotardos aunque haya empezado la primavera o el mejor lugar para celebrar el cumpleaños de un bebé, entre otras muchas dudas que surgen con la maternidad.  “Es una comunidad para mujeres, no para niños”, especifica Escalona, y se organiza en foros, grupos y blogs autogestionados por algunas de las 200.000 personas registradas, una mayoría de mujeres.

Charhadas apareció en la red cuando el fenómeno de las madres contando sus buenas o malas experiencias de primerizas en formato blog comenzaba. Seis años después, creen que la clave para la que han sobrevivido al boom está en haber acompañado a las mujeres en la siguiente etapa de la maternidad: “Nos dimos cuenta de que había mucha información sobre el recién nacido, pero nadie hablaba del resto de la infancia hasta la adolescencia”.


Facebook knows who your friends are. Now it could know about your health too | Technology | theguardian.com

Facebook knows who your friends are. Now it could know about your health too | Technology | theguardian.com.

Company exploring creation of online ‘support communities’ that would connect users suffering from various ailments

 

 

Facebook publishes one million new pieces of content each day.
Healthcare has historically been an area of interest for Facebook, but it has taken a backseat to more pressing products. Photograph: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP /Getty Images

 

Facebook already knows who your friends are and the kind of things that grab your attention. Soon, it could also know the state of your health.

 

On the heels of fellow Silicon Valley technology companies Apple and Google, Facebook is plotting its first steps into the fertile field of healthcare, said three people familiar with the matter. The people requested anonymity as the plans are still in development.

 

The company is exploring creating online “support communities” that would connect Facebook users suffering from various ailments. A small team is also considering new “preventative care” applications that would help people improve their lifestyles.

 

In recent months, the sources said, the social networking giant has been holding meetings with medical industry experts and entrepreneurs, and is setting up a research and development unit to test new health apps. Facebook is still in the idea-gathering stage, the people said.


I can't leave the internet to avoid trolls. But I don't have to carry it with me | Jessica Valenti | Comment is free | theguardian.com

I can’t leave the internet to avoid trolls. But I don’t have to carry it with me | Jessica Valenti | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Call it a social media stay-cation: I’m not shutting down my Twitter account, but I’m uninstalling the app

 

 

woman man mobile
This is what some people call “a date”. Photograph: Tetra Images / Corbis

 

There are plenty of studies and books pointing out the many ways technology is damaging the way we live our lives. We’re less connected to our kids, we’re attached to our screens, we’re burned out. Every year around this time you read another treatise about someone who has taken a long hiatus from the internet just to get some peace, quiet and perspective. I’m not quite ready for anything that serious – and hey, I work on the internet – but I am desperate for a change.

Writing on predominantly feminist issues brings out a certain … element, shall we say, in comments, emails, and on social media. And as resistant as I’ve become over the last 10 years by doing this kind of writing and public work, there’s a toll that comes with being told daily that you’re a slut, or a bitch, or that you should be raped all because you had the temerity to have an opinion and a vagina at the same time.

But taking my ball and going home isn’t an option – after all, this is my game, too. This is where I work and socialize, communicate with friends and colleagues. Why should I have to leave if I’m not the one behaving badly? Then last week, I came up with a more moderate solution than swearing off technology and comments sections: I took the Twitter and Facebook apps off my phone. It was glorious.

I know – hardly a huge sacrifice. But I’ve been shocked at how much of a difference it’s already made. I’m no longer “just checking” to see what people are talking about, only to come across some random person telling me he’d like to be my tampon for a day. (Yes, that is a real thing that happened.)

Since paring down my social media use, I’ve also become less likely to get drawn in to a conversation when I should be eating dinner with my family, or tweeting when I should be relaxing before bed. (There’s nothing worse for an insomniac than a flashing screen in your face, minutes before you try to get some shut-eye.) Less crap on my phone means more time for everything else.