Your private medical data is for sale – and it’s driving a business worth billions | Technology | The Guardian

Your medical data is for sale – all of it. Adam Tanner, a fellow at Harvard’s institute for quantitative social science and author of a new book on the topic, Our Bodies, Our Data, said that patients generally don’t know that their most personal information – what diseases they test positive for, what surgeries they have had – is the stuff of multibillion-dollar business.

Fuente: Your private medical data is for sale – and it’s driving a business worth billions | Technology | The Guardian


Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data

“DeepMind/Google are getting a free pass for swift and broad access into the NHS, on the back of persuasive but unproven promises of efficiency and innovation,” said Ms Powles. “We do not know——and have no power to find out——what Google and DeepMind are really doing with NHS patient data, nor the extent of Royal Free’s meaningful control over what DeepMind is doing.”

Fuente: Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data


WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian

The ‘radical transparency’ organization has published sensitive personal data belonging to hundreds of ordinary citizens, an investigation has revealed

Fuente: WikiLeaks posted medical files of rape victims and children, investigation finds | Media | The Guardian


Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian

Don’t put your daughter on the stage, Mrs Worthington. But in 2016, what if the stage is YouTube, and your daughter (or son) is demanding to be put on it, playing Minecraft?That’s the dilemma facing a growing number of parents, whose children aren’t just watching YouTube Minecraft channels like The Diamond Minecart, Stampy and CaptainSparklez – they want to follow in their blocky footsteps.

Fuente: Your kids want to make Minecraft YouTube videos – but should you let them? | Technology | The Guardian