Facebook is Collaborating with the Israeli Government to Determine What Should be Censored

Associated Press reports today from Jerusalem that “the Israeli government and Facebook have agreed to work together to determine how to tackle incitement on the social media network.” These meetings are taking place “as the government pushes ahead with legislative steps meant to force social networks to rein in content that Israel says incites violence.” In other words, Israel is about to legislatively force Facebook to censor content deemed by Israeli officials to be improper, and Facebook appears eager to appease those threats by working directly with the Israeli government to determine what content should be censored.

Fuente: Facebook is Collaborating with the Israeli Government to Determine What Should be Censored


The internet’s age of assembly is upon us – FT.com

Iwas fortunate to witness the birth of the world wide web up close. Initially, there were only pages of text connected by hyperlinks, but no people. So I formed one of the first internet start-ups, Ubique, with the mission of adding people to the web by developing social networking software which offered instant messaging, chat rooms and collaborative browsing.Since then, internet civilisation has mushroomed. According to a report published last year by the International Telecommunications Union, there are now 3.2bn internet users worldwide. But what kind of civilisation has it become? Imagine that 300m Twitter users wanted to change its rules of conduct, or that a billion Facebook users wanted to change its management. Is this possible or even thinkable?

Fuente: The internet’s age of assembly is upon us – FT.com


Technology comes to the rescue in migrant crisis – FT.com

Funzi.mobi informs migrants about Finnish rules and attitudes towards sexuality, Refugeesonrails.org distributes donated laptops and teaches migrants programming so they can land a dream job, and Refugees-Welcome.net is a kind of Airbnb for migrants,

Fuente: Technology comes to the rescue in migrant crisis – FT.com