The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price

Thanks to camera phones and social media, the deadly consequences of U.S. military operations are indeed being recorded, shared, and watched around the world on an unprecedented scale. But while civilian deaths are regularly reported in local media outlets in the Middle East, they are seldom reported in detail by international media.

Fuente: The U.S. Has Ramped Up Airstrikes Against ISIS in Raqqa, and Syrian Civilians Are Paying the Price


The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian

“Muslims are like cockroaches. An infestation that needs to be eradicated. Immediately. Permanently”, reads the tweet by one of thousands of anonymous far-right Twitter accounts that spread hate against ethnic and religious minorities each day.

Fuente: The far right thrives on global networks. They must be fought online and off | Julia Ebner | Opinion | The Guardian


The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The debate about “fake news” and the “post-truth” society we now supposedly inhabit has become the epistemological version of a feeding frenzy: so much heat, so little light. Two things about it are particularly infuriating. The first is the implicit assumption that “truth” is somehow a straightforward thing and our problem is that we just can’t be bothered any more to find it. The second is the failure to appreciate that the profitability, if not the entire business model, of both Google and Facebook depends critically on them not taking responsibility for what passes through their servers. So hoping that these companies will somehow fix the problem is like persuading turkeys to look forward to Christmas.

Fuente: Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


María Olivia Mönckeberg y el peligro de las noticias falsas: “Esto puede afectar incluso la seguridad de las personas” – El Mostrador

lo que me preocupa, lo que preocupa mucho en general, es esto de las noticias falsas. Yo lo centraría más en la cuestión de las famosas redes sociales.

Fuente: María Olivia Mönckeberg y el peligro de las noticias falsas: “Esto puede afectar incluso la seguridad de las personas” – El Mostrador


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador

Y pese a que la prensa mayoritaria lo negaba en forma maniaca, los correos filtrados por Wikileaks eran viralizados por las redes sociales, dando cuenta de una serie de situaciones como las siguientes: cerca de la mitad de las personas que lograron tener acceso a Hillary Clinton mientras era Secretaria de Estado, habían hecho, en los días previos, importantes donaciones a la Fundación Clinton (pay to play); su jefe de campaña era al mismo tiempo lobbista de los gobiernos de Arabia Saudita y Qatar (acusados de ser financistas de ISIS), para los cuales consiguió millonarias ventas de armas (durante el periodo en que Clinton fue Secretaria de Estado las exportaciones de armas duplicaron a las realizadas en tiempos de Bush).

Fuente: La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador


Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story

That which US journalism proclaims as its most precious contribution to a democratic polity, that it finds and publishes the facts, shorn of bias, was absent this week. Neither the journalism of facts nor the algorithms of the polling organisations could grasp the popular swell of affection for a candidate that nearly all mainstream media found irredeemably flawed — perhaps because he was flawed.The media that do get it are those that carry emotion: social media above all others.

Fuente: Social media alone understood the Donald Trump story


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

As the fallout from the first US presidential debate showed, taking social media at face value is foolhardy

Fuente: It might be trending, but that doesn’t make it true | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Caso coimas Latam golpea a Piñera y su nombre es asociado a “corrupción” en universo digital – El Mostrador

resalta el informe de la Universidad Central: “Interbarómetro” del mes de septiembre, que se dedica a medir los flujos de información e interacciones en la red, con el fin de “dar respuesta al desafío de comprender el creciente desplazamiento de la política hacia el territorio digital”.

Fuente: Caso coimas Latam golpea a Piñera y su nombre es asociado a “corrupción” en universo digital – El Mostrador


A day with Facebook’s trending topics: celebrity birthdays and Pokémon Go | Technology | The Guardian

From a hurricane to Brock Turner’s release, a lot happened last week. But Facebook calculated that a celebrity losing some weight was more important

Fuente: A day with Facebook’s trending topics: celebrity birthdays and Pokémon Go | Technology | The Guardian


El Servel obligado a retroceder autoriza propaganda en diarios electrónicos y redes sociales – El Mostrador

Desde la institución quisieron “aclarar la desafortunada polémica” motivada por la decisión, que fue criticada por todos los sectores e incluso considerada una “desventaja” por la Comisión de Constitución de la Cámara que buscaba citar a Nicolás Eyzaguirre para dar una explicación.

Fuente: El Servel obligado a retroceder autoriza propaganda en diarios electrónicos y redes sociales – El Mostrador


Colegio de Periodistas sobre instructivo Servel: “Es discriminatorio y propende a la concentración de medios” – El Mostrador

“El manual margina a los medios digitales, muchas veces de propiedad de colegas y organizaciones de periodistas, que son soportes válidos y necesarios para la difusión de estos procesos”, sostuvo su presidente (s) Patricio Martínez.

Fuente: Colegio de Periodistas sobre instructivo Servel: “Es discriminatorio y propende a la concentración de medios” – El Mostrador


Insólito: Servel prohíbe publicidad electoral en uso de redes sociales y medios electrónicos – El Mostrador

Entre las “no permitidas” se encuentran: La prohibición de realizar propaganda en plazas, parques y otros espacios públicos no autorizados por el Servicio, o el impedimento de desplegar piezas gráficas que superen los dos metros cuadrados.Y: la prohibición a realizar propaganda electoral a través de redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, entre otros y a realizar propaganda electoral en diarios electrónicos.Asimismo, se prohíbe el envío de mensajes y llamadas telefónicas.

Fuente: Insólito: Servel prohíbe publicidad electoral en uso de redes sociales y medios electrónicos – El Mostrador


Nueva realidad que traen Facebook Live y Periscope | ELESPECTADOR.COM

Las herramientas de video en vivo de estas redes sociales traen ventajas para la diversificación de discursos, pero también presentan retos para las plataformas y para la sociedad en general.

Fuente: Nueva realidad que traen Facebook Live y Periscope | ELESPECTADOR.COM


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian

Nicky Woolf in San Francisco@nickywoolfThursday 23 June 2016 07.32 BSTLast modified on Thursday 23 June 2016 08.28 BST Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+Shares1,259Comments274Save for laterLawmakers turned to Periscope and Facebook Live to broadcast a sit-in protest in the House of Representatives on Wednesday after the Speaker’s office switched off the TV cameras inside the chamber.

Fuente: Democrats stream gun control sit-in on Periscope after Republicans turn TV cameras off | US news | The Guardian


Burundi turns to WhatsApp as political turmoil brings media blackout | Global development | The Guardian

Threats and harassment have driven journalists into exile, leaving social media to fill the void for those wanting to reach the world and connect disparate groups

Fuente: Burundi turns to WhatsApp as political turmoil brings media blackout | Global development | The Guardian


¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales

La agenda corta antidelincuencia en tramitación incorpora una norma que permitirá ampliar el secreto de las investigaciones judiciales, sancionando a cualquiera que lo viole con la privación de libertad hasta por 540 días. Nuevamente nos encontramos frente a una norma inserta en un proyecto que ignora la evolución e impacto propios del periodismo de investigación que actualmente tiene lugar en la red.

Fuente: ¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales


Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador

La Fronda pretende encerrar el debate en los marcos legales, arrinconar al SII y deslegitimar a la Fiscalía, todo eso para escapar de lo que parece una tormenta perfecta. La norma que se propone no pretende, solamente, reducir el espacio de acción de la prensa, sino también pretende privar a la opinión pública de información fundamental para decidir por quién votar y por quién no votar. Esto explica por qué la Fronda se siente tan amenazada por la nueva lógica de los medios digitales y las redes: ya no puede controlar los contenidos, ya no puede censurar en las cortes. La Fronda busca protegerse de forma impúdica, aterrada ante la disolución del principio de autoridad que había guiado la transición.

Fuente: Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador


The racist hijacking of Microsoft’s chatbot shows how the internet teems with hate | World news | The Guardian

Microsoft was apologetic when its AI Twitter feed started spewing bigoted tweets – but the incident simply highlights the toxic, often antisemitic, side of social media

Fuente: The racist hijacking of Microsoft’s chatbot shows how the internet teems with hate | World news | The Guardian


Reddit: can anyone clean up the mess behind 'the front page of the internet'? | Technology | The Guardian

Reddit: can anyone clean up the mess behind ‘the front page of the internet’? | Technology | The Guardian.

Reddit's Alien logo and CEO Ellen Pao.Reddit’s Alien logo and CEO Ellen Pao. Photograph: Robert Galbraith/Reuters

 

When Ellen Pao became chief executive of the social news site Reddit in November 2014, few thought her tenure would change the make-up of the site that bills itself the “front page of the internet”. Thrust into the limelight by the surprise resignation of the company’s previous CEO Yishan Wong, Pao had only joined Reddit the previous year, working on building “strategic partnerships that benefit the community”.

 

And yet just four months after starting, she has led the site through one of its biggest steps towards being the mainstream hub that that “front page” billing has always implied was its aim. In the wake of the vast cache of nude celebrity photos, leaked on 4chan but rapidly centered on “The Fappening”, a Reddit subforum (or “subreddit”) which swelled to millions of members before being shut down by the site’s administrators, Reddit has banned “involuntary pornography” entirely.

 

“Last year, we missed a chance to be a leader in social media when it comes to protecting your privacy – something we’ve cared deeply about since Reddit’s inception,” the site’s admins wrote in a message to users. “At our recent all hands company meeting, this was something that we all, as a company, decided we needed to address.”

The new privacy policy came into effect on Tuesday 10 March. But the company has an uphill struggle if the intention is to clean up Reddit, even to the smallest extent.


Un nuevo portal en internet para una nueva etapa de Resumen – Resumen

Un nuevo portal en internet para una nueva etapa de Resumen – Resumen.

Nuevaweb

Esta mañana estrenamos un nuevo rostro en internet. Tras más de 5 años, hemos sustituido la versión original de nuestro portal resumen.cl, por este nuevo formato que nos permite una mejor interacción con nuestros lectores que nos siguen a través del sitio web o las redes sociales, ya que precisamente este nuevo formato nos facilita la comunicación entre estas dos áreas que hasta ahora manejábamos en paralelo, lo que sin duda redundará en una mayor actividad, crecimiento de audiencias y potenciación del medio.

Desde hoy pueden comentar nuestras noticias del portal, desde sus cuentas de Facebook o Twitter, así también podrán compartirlas directamente desde el portal hacia las redes sociales.  Esperamos que efectivamente realicen este ejercicio, que nos hagan llegar sus comentarios, sugerencias, opiniones, criticas, todo aquello que nos ayude a crecer y mejorar nuestro trabajo.

 


Lo que pasa en Twitter se queda (casi siempre) en Twitter | Verne EL PAÍS

Lo que pasa en Twitter se queda (casi siempre) en Twitter | Verne EL PAÍS.

La bolsa de Nueva York, el día en el que Twitter comenzó a cotizarLa bolsa de Nueva York, el día en el que Twitter comenzó a cotizar.

Twitter me gusta. No lo voy a negar. Y no estoy solo: esta red social cuenta con 288 millones de usuarios que se conectan al menos una vez al mes y que escriben 500 millones de tuits cada día, según datos facilitados por la empresa. Esos tuits pueden ayudarte a pasar el rato o proponerte artículos que no sospechabas ni que existían. También, por qué no, en Twitter puedes conocer a gente maja e incluso encontrar trabajo.

Pero todo esto no quita que Twitter esté sobrevalorado. Le prestamos más atención a esta red de la que realmente se merece. Es una red muy usada, sin duda, pero también tiene sus propios códigos y un entorno cerrado. Es decir, lo que pasa en Twitter se queda en Twitter.

Entonces, ¿por qué parece lo contrario?

Los titulares que hacen referencia a cómo “arden las redes sociales”, suelen centrarse en Twitter. Alguno puede creer que los medios tratan lo que ocurre en la red buscando el clic fácil, incluso el retuit. No es así. Varía mucho del medio (y de la noticia), pero Twitter suele traer menos de un 10% del tráfico que procede de las redes sociales. La mayor parte, hasta el 90%, viene de Facebook, que tiene 890 millones de usuarios cada día. Incluso a pesar de que Twitter está lleno de periodistas que se retuitean los unos a los otros.

Simplemente ocurre que Twitter es muy cómodo para los medios (sí, Verne incluido), ya que los usuarios comentan muy a menudo contenidos ligados a la actualidad, por lo que son un termómetro rápido para saber qué está ocurriendo.

Hay más. Como escribe Eugeni Morozov en To Save Everything, Click Here, no es de extrañar que muchas campañas promocionales aspiren a ser el centro de conversación en esta red: “Una vez la historia consigue este estatus tan deseado, atrae aún más atención, llegando a conversaciones que van más allá de Twitter. En este sentido, Twitter también es una máquina, no una cámara; no se limita a reflejar realidades: las crea de forma activa”.

Sería más difícil recurrir a Facebook para intentar ver qué se está comentando sobre un tema. La mayoría de los perfiles Facebook son privados y sus actualizaciones no suelen ser comentarios a la actualidad, sino más bien contenido personal. .

Instagram también tiene más peso que Twitter. Desde diciembre, también cuenta con más usuarios: 300 millones al mes. Pero claro, los contenidos de esta red no están tan marcados por la actualidad como ocurre en el caso de Twitter y aunque se usen hashtags, resulta más difícil buscar fotos sobre un tema que tuits.


Saudi blogger receives first 50 lashes of sentence for 'insulting Islam' | World news | The Guardian

Saudi blogger receives first 50 lashes of sentence for ‘insulting Islam’ | World news | The Guardian.

Raif Badawi has been given 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes to be carried out over 20 weeks

  • The Guardian
Raif Badawi with his children in a picture supplied to Amnesty.
Raif Badawi with his children in a picture supplied to Amnesty. Photograph: Amnesty

A Saudi blogger convicted of insulting Islam was brought after Friday prayers to a public square in the port city of Jeddah and flogged 50 times before hundreds of spectators, a witness to the lashing said.

The witness said Raif Badawi’s feet and hands were shackled during the flogging but his face was visible. He remained silent and did not cry out, said the witness, who spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity fearing government reprisal.

Badawi was sentenced last May to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes. He had criticized Saudi Arabia’s powerful clerics on a liberal blog he founded. The blog has since been shut down. He was also ordered to pay a fine of 1m riyals or about $266,600.


Mil latigazos para silenciar la crítica | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Mil latigazos para silenciar la crítica | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Las monarquías de la península Arábiga recurren a leyes antiterroristas para encarcelar a los activistas

Raef Badawi, el bloguero saudí preso desde 2012 por insultar al islam, con sus tres hijos. / ENSAF HAIDAR (BLOOMBERG)

Ensaf Haidar tiembla ante la mera perspectiva de los 1.000 latigazos que aguardan a su marido, Raef Badawi, condenado en Arabia Saudí por “faltar al respeto al islam”. Su delito fue defender la libertad de expresión y haber fundado un portal en Internet donde se podía debatir sobre religión. El brutal castigo, que se ejecutará en tandas de 50 azotes propinados en sucesivos viernes y que se suma a 10 años de privación de libertad, busca disuadir a otros activistas de los derechos civiles en el Reino del Desierto. Como en el resto de las monarquías de la península Arábiga, el temor a que la mínima apertura socave su poder absoluto se ha exacerbado desde la primavera árabe.

“En otros países se denuncia la reducción del espacio para la sociedad civil, en esta parte del mundo no hay espacio que reducir”, lamenta Khalid Ibrahim, codirector del Gulf Center for Human Rights (GCHR). “Los defensores de derechos humanos son tratados como criminales, les resulta imposible encontrar un trabajo y no se les permite organizarse. De Omán, donde detienen a un activista y no sabemos dónde está, a Arabia Saudí, donde encarcelan a cualquiera que discrepa, pasando por Emiratos, que no tolera la crítica, y Bahréin, donde siguen las protestas; la situación es muy mala”, resume durante una conversación telefónica.

“Raef no es un criminal. No es un asesino o un violador. Es un bloguero. Su único delito es ser una voz libre en un país que no tolera ni entiende la libertad”, repite una y otra vez la citada Haidar quien, tras la detención de su esposo en 2012 se exilió con sus tres hijos en Canadá.


Twitter and Instagram users can learn a lot from a 1920s journalist | Comment is free | The Guardian

Twitter and Instagram users can learn a lot from a 1920s journalist | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Social media give us the power to create a real-time portrait of our age, just as pioneering journalist Ben Hecht documented his own era

Ben Hecht On Horseback
Chicago Daily News reporter Ben Hecht on horseback in 1915 … we can each create a Chicago of the mind as real as the one Hecht created in print. Photograph: Chicago History Museum/Getty

Chicago, late afternoon in 1921. Outside, the pavements are slick with rain and in the newsroom, amid cigar smoke, they can feel the rumble as the Chicago Daily News rolls off the press. Enter reporter Ben Hecht, with a new idea. He will write a daily sketch of the city’s life, modelled on the stories of Scheherazade and entitled 1001 Afternoons in Chicago. Hecht is hired, and from then on, throughout the 1920s, not a day goes by without a miniature masterpiece of reportage.

By the time he was finished, and had gone to Broadway to write The Front Page, Hecht had documented in detail the everyday world in which all fictional heroes of film noir begin their adventures. It is a world of cardsharps, condemned men, sex workers, Yiddish tailors and Chinese laundrymen. Hecht’s description of one gives a flavour of the way he wrote: “There is something immaculate about Sing Lee. Sing Lee has been ironing out collars and shirts for 35 years. And 35 years have been ironing Sing Lee out.” But beyond the individuals, the main character for Hecht is always Chicago: its windows always rain-spattered, its streets always dark, its coffee always laced with bootlegged brandy.

Hecht was part of an international cadre of reporters who all had a similar idea at the same time: to make newswriting literary, so it could sustain greater length, pack a bigger emotional punch, but to use demotic language for a mass audience. They called it “reportage” – which is only French for reporting, but denotes its character as literary non-fiction.

Thanks to Hecht’s reportage, we possess, 90 years on, a granular social history of the time, one that the people of Chicago were seeing written in real time. While the news pages told them that a judge had released some woman charged with prostitution, Hecht tells us how her eyes pleaded for leniency – “a dog takes a kick like this with eyes like these” – and how, after release, she halted by a drugstore window to reapply her makeup.

Ben Hecht in 1918
The writer Ben Hecht in 1918 … we should be claiming our right to be lyrical and profound on social media. Photograph: Chicago History Museum/Getty

In a brilliant piece, Hecht catches the radical trade union leader Big Bill Haywood watching a burlesque show in a supposed last week of freedom prior to starting a 20-year jail sentence for sedition. A few days later, Haywood escaped to Russia, but Hecht uses this event to take us on a tour of lowlife Chicago through the eyes of a man who loves it, and will never see it again.

Today, technology has given all of us the power to be our own version of Ben Hecht. Amid the trolling and the cat pictures and the clickbait, there are still enough real things said on Twitter, and beautiful images posted on Instagram or Tumblr, to make them function as real-time journals of the public space we inhabit.

Today’s Chinese laundry worker can write his own story; so can the sex worker in the dock. Plus there are millions of us posting cityscapes and candid street photography every second. Nobody can follow it all: but by following a fraction of it we each create a Chicago of the mind just as real as the one Hecht created in newsprint.


Los “trolls” de Internet son sádicos, narcisistas y maquiavélicos – BioBioChile

Los “trolls” de Internet son sádicos, narcisistas y maquiavélicos – BioBioChile.

 

stupid_systemus (cc) / Flickrstupid_systemus (cc) / Flickr
Publicado por Eduardo Woo
¿Qué sientes con esta noticia?

  • felicidad
  • sorpresa
  • indiferencia
  • tristeza
  • enojo

Seguramente lo has visto en foros o en las zonas de comentario de noticias. Generan un extenso rechazo y generalmente se toman el tiempo de responder, cosa de seguir generando ruido. Esos son los denominados trolls de Internet.

Hasta ahora no se sabía mucho de lo que son este tipo de personas, sin embargo un estudio canadiense logró un acercamiento en la personalidad de estos personajes que abundan en la web.

Fue en la revista Personality and Individual Differences donde se publicó la investigación que tomó a 1.215 personas, quienes respondieron una encuesta de manera presencial y virtual, respectivamente.

En ella se hacían consultas como qué sitios web frecuentaban, horas en ella, si participaban de foros, en sitios de noticias o YouTube. Además se incluyó consultas que venían a medir la “Tétrada Oscura”, algo que los sicólogos usan para saber sobre el narcisismo, maquiavelismo, sicopatía y personalidad sádica, con opciones tales como “disfruto bromear a expensas de los demás” y “disfruto ser el villano en juegos y torturar a otros personajes”, informó CNN México.

Los resultados dieron con que quienes practicaban el trolleo eran precisamente los que cumplían con la “Tétrada Oscura”, es decir, sádicos, sicópatas y maquiavélicos (un desprecio por la moral y tendencia a manipular o explotar a otros). Lo que puede ser observado en este gráfico que expuso Phsycology Today


Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept

Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read? – The Intercept.

By 246
Featured photo - Should Twitter, Facebook and Google Executives be the Arbiters of What We See and Read?DEAUVILLE, FRANCE – MAY 26: (L-R) Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Union, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook Inc. and Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc. arrive for the internet session of the G8 summit on May 26, 2011 in Deauville, France. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe – Pool/Getty Images)

There have been increasingly vocal calls for Twitter, Facebook and other Silicon Valley corporations to more aggressively police what their users are permitted to see and read. Last month in The Washington Post, for instance, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow demanded that social media companies ban the accounts of “terrorists” who issue “direct calls” for violence.

This week, the announcement by Twitter CEO Dick Costolo that the company would prohibit the posting of the James Foley beheading video and photos from it (and suspend the accounts of anyone who links to the video) met with overwhelming approval. What made that so significant, as The Guardian‘s James Ball noted today, was that “Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception.” By contrast, Facebook has long actively regulated what its users are permitted to say and read; at the end of 2013, the company reversed its prior ruling and decided that posting of beheading videos would be allowed, but only if the user did not express support for the act.

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

It’s tempting to support criminalization of, say, racist views as long as one focuses on one’s contempt for those views and ignores the serious dangers of vesting the state with the general power to create lists of prohibited ideas. That’s why free speech defenders such as the ACLU so often represent and defend racists and others with heinous views in free speech cases: because that’s where free speech erosions become legitimized in the first instance when endorsed or acquiesced to.

The question posed by Twitter’s announcement is not whether you think it’s a good idea for people to see the Foley video. Instead, the relevant question is whether you want Twitter, Facebook and Google executives exercising vast power over what can be seen and read.

It’s certainly true, as defenders of Twitter have already pointed out, that as a legal matter, private actors – as opposed to governments – always possess and frequently exercise the right to decide which opinions can be aired using their property. Generally speaking, the public/private dichotomy is central to any discussions of the legality or constitutionality of “censorship.”


Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com

Twitter: from free speech champion to selective censor? | Technology | theguardian.com.

By acting on footage of James Foley’s murder, Twitter has taken responsibility in a way it hasn’t over abuse and threats. So what happens next?
Man's hands at computer

Twitter was once characterised by its general counsel as ‘the free speech wing of the free speech party’. Photograph: Alamy

Twitter has got itself into a tangle. The social network’s decision to remove all links to the horrific footage showing the apparent beheading of the photojournalist James Foley is one that most of its users, reasonably, support.

The social network went still further, suspending or banning users who shared the footage or certain stills, following public tweets from the company’s CEO, Dick Costolo, that it would take action against such users.

It is hard to think of anyone having a good reason to view or share such barbaric footage, but Twitter’s proactive approach reverses a long record of non-intervention.

Twitter has promoted its free speech credentials aggressively since the network’s inception. The company’s former general counsel once characterised the company as “the free speech wing of the free speech party”, an approach characterised by removing content only in extreme situations – when made to by governments in accordance with local law, or through various channels designed to report harassment.

The social network’s response to the Foley footage and images is clearly a break from that response: not only did the network respond to reports complaining about posts using the material, they also seem to have proactively sought it out in other instances.

And yet there is not a universal consensus on the use of the images, as was reflected by the New York Post and New York Daily News’ decision to use graphic stills from the footage as their front-page splashes. Here begin the problems for Twitter: the network decided not to ban or suspend either outlet for sharing the images – despite banning other users for doing the same.

Twitter has not been nearly as eager to enter the content policing game in other situations. Like many other major companies, Twitter has long insisted it is not a publisher but a platform.

The distinction is an important one: publishers, such as the Guardian, bear a far greater degree of responsibility for what appears on their sites. By remaining a platform, Twitter is absolved of legal responsibility for most of the content of tweets. But by making what is in essence an editorial decision not to host a certain type of content, Twitter is rapidly blurring that line.

The network has not been as quick to involve itself when its users are sharing content far beyond what is even remotely acceptable – even when the profile of the incidents is high.


James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com

James Foley and the daily horrors of the internet: think hard before clicking | James Ball | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Outcry over footage of Foley’s apparent beheading raises difficult questions about editorial ethics – and our own choices

 

 

James Foley in Syria in 2012
James Foley in 2012. In a statement on his Facebook page, his mother said: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.’ Photograph: Nicole Tung/AP

 

With depressing frequency in this summer of diverse horrors, we hear tales of desperate human misery, suffering and depravity – and because we live now in an era where virtually every phone is a globally connected camera, we are confronted with graphic evidence of tragedy.

 

The footage of the apparent beheading (to refer to the atrocity as an execution serves only to lend a veneer of dignity to barbarism) of the US photojournalist James Foley at the hands of a British Isis extremist has raised particularly strong feelings.

 

Social networks are banning users who share the footage. Newspapers are facing opprobrium for the choices they make in showing stills or parts of the video. Others, of course, will seek out the video after seeing the row, or else post it around the internet in a juvenile form of the free speech argument.

 

Before considering the rights and wrongs of the position, there is one fact we should face: we are presented with images of grotesque violence on a daily basis. Last month the New York Times ran on its front page the dead and broken body of a Palestinian child.

 

Like Foley, that child was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s friend, and in a connected world there is just as much chance his family saw the photo and its spread as Foley’s will see the latest awful images of their loved one.

 

That photo raised little controversy in comparison to the use of images of Foley. Photos of groups of civilian men massacred by Isis across Iraq and Syria – widely shared on social media and used by publications across the world – caused no outcry whatsoever.

 

It’s hard to look at that and not see a double standard: like many other courageous and talented people, Foley had chosen to travel to the region, and knew the risks that entailed. Others were killed simply fleeing their homes. In a strange and bitter irony, one of the duties of photographers such as Foley is documenting bloodshed in order to show the world.

 

To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.


Right to be forgotten? Most of us are still trying to be remembered | Dale Lately | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Right to be forgotten? Most of us are still trying to be remembered | Dale Lately | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

While some seek to erase their online record the rest of us languish on the long tail – heard, seen and read by almost nobody
laptop woman
‘The web acts like a giant version of Orwell’s “memory hole” – consigning thoughts, fears and feelings to virtual oblivion.’ Photograph: Getty Images/Image Source

The famous dream of being wiped from the web. Take former Formula One head Max Mosley, who has launched legal action against Googledemanding the removal of images of him at a sex party from the search engine. Most of the rest of us know all too well about being forgotten.

A blog I began a few years ago – a stunningly successful experiment in national secrecy located several thousand miles up a winding gorge in the outer reaches of the internet – had, like most blogs, all the virtual footfall of a moon crater in low season. In terms of impact, I’d have made more of an impression standing on an upturned bucket beside a motorway, performing interpretative dance to passing truck drivers.

I’m not alone. From musicians to entrepreneurs, writers to pop-up burger chefs, millions are desperately perspiring at the coal-face of the attention economy. One hundred and eighty-one million blogs wererecorded by Nielsen in 2011. The best part of half a billion tweets are now sent daily. Facebook, Blogger and Twitter regularly invite us to study the analytics for our posts and pages.

“I always make sure I can see the Twitter screen on my laptop when I am writing,” self-publishing author Ben Galley declares, just one of an army of unpaid e-authors who rise at dawn to promote themselves on social media before their paid job. A raft of startups like ClickSubmit and Outbrain promise to get you noticed on the net; trades from handymen to hoteliers face the prospect that unless they get busily networking to take on Airbnb and other Web 2.0 disrupters, they’ll end up biting analogue dust.

And yet with the rise of “erase your history” software such as X-pire! and ephemeral apps like Snapchat and Wickr, we seem preoccupied with an urge for removal and erasure – an idea now enshrined in European legislation. Whether individuals have the right to remove their own digital footprint is a good question, but it ignores the plight of a much larger but less celebrated group: those working hard at being remembered in the first place.


Shh, don't tell: secret-sharing apps are all the rage, but they're also full of lies | Emma Brockes | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Shh, don’t tell: secret-sharing apps are all the rage, but they’re also full of lies | Emma Brockes | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Whisper and Secret feed our Facebook impulses to share all. Their anonymity grants license to fakery. As if that wasn’t a big enough problem online already

 

 

whisper finger
In the few months since the launch of Secret and apps like it, the bogusness of the postings has underlined the pursuit of anonymous fame Photograph: Alamy

 

There are two types of secrets. There are the ones you keep to protect your self-interest – I’m using company time to look for a new job, say, or I’m cheating on my spouse. And there are the sentimental secrets, which you keep because they break a social taboo – as in, I love one of my children more than the other, or I don’t give a toss about recycling.

To these staples of evasion we may now add a third category: the fake secret, given life this year, albeit accidentally, by apps like Secret and Whisper, which encourage users to amuse themselves and each other by sharing cute, shocking or whistle-blowing confidences, under the shield of anonymity and in even hotterpursuit of shares, likes and comments than on Facebook.

For example, from Secret: I sometimes drop acid during chemistry class. My secret: I’m the teacher.

And: I like to eat illegal black market horse meat.

As well as: I’m a famous celebrity and …

Yeah, but you’re not, though, are you? And you probably don’t eat horse meat, which is in any case legal in the US. And if you “drop acid” in your chemistry class, it’s probably the chemistry class of your mind, after binging on one too many hours of Breaking Bad.

On April Fools’ Day this week, as one cast an even more jaded eye than usual over the contents of the internet, it was these mobile indulgences built for attracting attention at all costs, that appeared to be comprised almost entirely of makey-uppy contributions by strangers chasing the thrill of approval.

We have come to expect fakery from every public forum, starting with the guests on TV chat shows, and ending with hoaxes on Twitter. But in the few months since the launch of Secret and apps like it, the bogusness of the postings has underlined that weird phenomenon, the pursuit of anonymous fame: a like is a like is a like. And it doesn’t much matter what you say to acquire it.


Urban Instagram photographers you should follow | Cities | theguardian.com

Urban Instagram photographers you should follow | Cities | theguardian.com.

Love urban photography? Addicted to Instagram? These snappers capture their cities in beautiful and surprising ways

Follow our @GuardianCities Instagram account for daily updates on great urban photography from across the world and to share your photos with us. Here are the latest updates

 

 

 

SOUTH AFRICA

 

Instagram: Johannesburg ice-cream van
Photograph: @garethpon

@garethpon is an urban photographer from Johannesburg. His favourite spot to photograph in the city is Maboneng Precint. For him, photography is not so much about shooting pretty pictures, but about “being as honourable as possible to capture in a single image the story that a moment wants to tell”.


The top 30 young people in digital media: Nos 10-1 | Media | The Guardian

The top 30 young people in digital media: Nos 10-1 | Media | The Guardian.

Vine star Jerome Jarre, comedian Hannah Hart, photojournalist Mosa’ab Elshamy, fashion video blogger Dina Toki-O and Farea Al-Muslimi, the Yemeni journalist whose village suffered a drone strike days before his testimony to the US senate judiciary committee, finish atop our top ten of the most exciting people under 30 in digital media. Chosen by the Guardian’s 10 trainee digital journalists, Alex Hern, Matt Andrews, and BuzzFeed’s editorial director Jack Shepherd
  • The Guardian,

El Congreso de Periodismo Digital celebra 15 años de cambio tecnológico – Público.es

El Congreso de Periodismo Digital celebra 15 años de cambio tecnológico – Público.es.

Los organizadores del evento, que reúne en Huesca a los profesionales del sector, apuestan por la información comprometida, el emprendimiento y las redes sociales

MARIMAR CABRERA Zaragoza 13/03/2014 07:00

Cartel del Congreso de Periodismo Digital de Huesca.

Cartel del Congreso de Periodismo Digital de Huesca.

Ocho ordenadores conectados a una línea Rdsi eran más que suficientes para que todos los asistentes al primer Congreso de Periodismo Digital, en el año 2000, consultaran sus correos electrónicos. Y no se generaban colas ni  atascos. Unos 150 periodistas participaban en Huesca en el primer encuentro en España en el que se hablaba de información en Internet. Hoy y mañana, el congreso celebra su 15ª edición con una apuesta por el periodismo comprometido, el emprendimiento y las redes sociales.

Sin adsl, wifi, smarthphones, ni Facebook ni Twitter. “En el primer congreso había un par de portátiles y varios móviles de un tamaño enorme,  pero ya se apuntó que las nuevas tecnologías cambiarían la forma de trabajar de los periodistas, de consumir la información y los propios modelos de financiación”, explica Fernando García Mongay, director del congreso.

En otros debates menos acertados, ese mismo año se analizaba la tecnología wap, el  periodismo en la televisión interactiva y el teléfono móvil y preocupaba la apuesta “tímida” de los grandes medios por la red. La conclusión más repetida de la primera edición fue “dudas sobre el futuro del periodismo digital”.

Con la burbuja de las puntocom hubo muchos que dijeron que “la moda” había tocado techo. “Por suerte, había una pandilla de bichos raros al fondo de las redacciones que seguían diciendo que Internet era importante y el congreso sirvió para reunir a muchos de ellos e impulsar proyectos”, explica el periodista Pedro de Alzaga, que ha estado presente en las primeras y últimas ediciones.


La editora de la revista ‘Penthouse’ se declara en bancarrota | Economía | EL PAÍS

La editora de la revista ‘Penthouse’ se declara en bancarrota | Economía | EL PAÍS.

Nueva York 17 SEP 2013 – 11:28 CET

Portada de la revista ‘Penthouse’.

FriendFinder Networks, una compañía estadounidense que agrupa distintas redes sociales y edita la publicación masculina para adultos Penthouse, ha presentado este martes antes el Tribunal de Quiebras del Estado de Delaware la solicitud para declararse en suspensión de pagos.

La editora de la revista fundada por Bob Guccione permanece en números rojos desde 2006 y fue excluida del índice bursátil Nasdaq el pasado 7 de agosto. Esta martes, como paso previo a la reestructuración de su deuda, ha registrado su su solicitud para acogerse a la protección del capítulo 11 de la Ley de Quiebras de EEUU.

 


La crisis de los medios tradicionales y el futuro digital del periodismo – El Mostrador

La crisis de los medios tradicionales y el futuro digital del periodismo – El Mostrador.

“La televisión sufrirá en la próxima década una crisis similar a la de los periódicos pues ya se acerca la ruptura de sus paradigmas básicos de la era de comunicación de masa”, aseguró el destacado periodista norteamericano Rosental Calmon Aves.

El periodismo de la era post-industrial es una realidad ineludible marcada por el impacto de la explosión de las redes sociales, la cual ha dado paso a una nueva lógica comunicacional, muy distinta a la anterior, tal como lo afirma el destacado periodista y académico brasileño- estadounidense Rosental Calmon Alves.

Calmon Alves,  que preside el programa de  Periodismo para las Américas de la Fundación Knight en la Universidad de Texas, en Austin, visitó Santiago la semana pasada para participar como conferencista  principal en el cierre del Seminario sobre Periodismo Digital organizado por la Instituto de Comunicación y Nuevas Tecnologías de la Universidad Mayor y la Sociedad Española Americana  de Periodistas, los días 4, 5, y 6 de septiembre.

En una charla visionaria y analítica, el profesor Calmon Alves describió el complejo ecosistema de la comunicación digital, el escenario actual de las redes sociales, y exploró algunos de los desafíos que enfrentan los periodistas y la industria de los medios .


MediaGuardian lists digital consumer as most powerful industry figure | Media | The Guardian

MediaGuardian lists digital consumer as most powerful industry figure | Media | The Guardian.

Annual ranking reflects mobile and social media’s transformation of sector long dominated by moguls, editors and celebrities

Larry Page

Google’s CEO, Larry Page, was second in MediaGuardian’s list, which also included Twitter, Facebook, Apple and Amazon bosses in the top 10. Photograph: Reuters

The digital consumer – listed as “you” – tops MediaGuardian’s annual ranking of the UK’s 100 most powerful industry figures this year, reflecting the extent to which mobile and social media are transforming an industry traditionally dominated by moguls, editors and celebrities.

The Woolwich murder, Boston bombings and more recently the Syrian chemical weapons massacre demonstrated the extent to which ordinary members of the public, using smartphones and social media, are shaping coverage of major news stories these days.

“You” also reflects how online consumers – interacting, sharing content and shopping via mobile devices – are driving the UK digital economy, which is growing at more than 10% a year and which it is estimated by Boston Consulting Group will be worth £225bn by 2016. “Both as the audience and creators of content, it’s all about people power,” the MediaGuardian 100 panel concluded.


John Paton, fundador de Digital First Media, desgrana las claves para hacer rentables los medios digitales.

“Las redes sociales sirven para hacer un mejor periodismo”

http://tecnologia.elpais.com/tecnologia/2013/03/15/actualidad/1363378627_134732.html

 

John Paton, consejero delegado de Digital First Media / CLAUDIO ÁLVAREZ (EL PAÍS)

Llegó al periodismo como paparazzo precoz. En su primera semana de universidad se encontró con un reputado columnista del Toronto Sun borracho en un cabaré con una bailarina interpretando la danza del vientre. Se fue a la redacción con la foto y le dijeron qué quería a cambio. Así consiguió John Paton (Glasgow, 1957) su primer trabajo. Su labor era más cercana al de botones que al aprendiz de periodista. “Me limitaba a llevar cafés y sándwiches por las mesas… Poco más”.

En 1994 saltó a Internet. Pasó a dirigir un portal de noticias, canoe.com, un icono en su país de adopción, Canadá, que se extendió por el mundo. A España llegó como micanoa.com. A finales de la década estalló la burbuja de las puntocom y decidió dar el giro definitivo a su vida: llevar la digitalización allí donde se demandaran sus servicios. Así nació Digital First Media, hoy octavo grupo de noticias por audiencia en Internet, que presta además servicios de consultoría a 75 diarios y suma 800 proyectos web. Tiene más de 10.000 empleados y 61 millones de clientes mensuales. Las cifras le acompañan: 1.072 millones de euros de ingresos en el último año. Solo en publicidad digital factura 165 millones. A este visionario, sonriente y natural en sus exposiciones, no le tiembla el pulso con las malas noticias. Del nombre de la compañía se deduce que la prioridad de los medios en que trabaja está en la web.


De José Martí a Facebook, periodismo y compromiso

http://www.surysur.net/2013/02/de-jose-marti-a-facebook-periodismo-y-compromiso/

feb 5 2013

Hoy día, algunas de las mayores comunidades humanas, ya no son países, por muy poblados que sean, sino que son comunidades digitales. Facebook son casi mil millones de usuarios, Twitter son unos seiscientos millones de usuarios. Cada día se conectan a Google más de mil millones de personas. Cada día se crean unos 100 mil blogs, o sea, unos 36 millones de blogs nuevos al año, que se añaden a los 300 millones de blogs ya existentes.
El volumen de la información digital es cada día más de 10 veces superior al volumen de la información impresa tradicional.

La Era Gutenberg se termina y la Era Web comienza. Y en este contexto la pregunta que nos hacemos es ¿qué haría hoy el joven Martí para difundir sus ideas? Y yo pienso que si Martí tuviese hoy dieciséis años, digamos, sería sin discusión un bloguero, un facebuquero, un twittero. ¿Por qué lo afirmo? Porque todos sabemos que José Martí fundó a los dieciséis años su primer periódico, que se llamaba El Diablo Cojuelo. Lo fundó aquí, en La Habana, en la calle Obispo, el 14 de enero de 1869. Dieciséis años tenía, una precocidad excepcional, pero una precocidad que se entiende en un joven inquieto.