Instagram es la red social más dañina para la salud mental de los adolescentes – El Mostrador

“Los jóvenes que pasan más de dos horas al día en redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter o Instagram son más propensos a sufrir problemas de salud mental, sobre todo angustia y síntomas de ansiedad y depresión”, informa el estudio realizado por la Royal Society of Public Healt y la Universidad de Cambridge.

Fuente: Instagram es la red social más dañina para la salud mental de los adolescentes – El Mostrador


Tumblr was my saviour. It made me see I wasn’t monstrous and unloveable | Jonno Revanche | Opinion | The Guardian

There has been much written on the negative influence of social media on young people. But these websites can also be life-changers too, in a good way

Fuente: Tumblr was my saviour. It made me see I wasn’t monstrous and unloveable | Jonno Revanche | Opinion | The Guardian


Ciudadanía digital, elemento clave de la formación ciudadana – El Mostrador

¿Qué medios han utilizado los jóvenes para participar en el debate acerca de la ley de despenalización del aborto? ¿Cómo se harán presentes en las próximas elecciones municipales? Las dudas son especialmente pertinentes, a pocos días que se haya promulgado la ley que crea el Plan de Formación Ciudadana para el sistema escolar.En el mediano plazo se creará la nueva asignatura obligatoria de formación ciudadana para los estudiantes de tercero y cuarto medio. En este grupo etario, nueve de cada diez jóvenes tiene cuenta en alguna red social (Estudio ‘Nuevas Tecnologías e Internet’ del INJUV, 2015) y dedican en promedio 3,5 horas al día interactuando en alguna plataforma de comunicación social (Estudio ‘Uso TICS y Escolares’, Tren Digital 2015).

Fuente: Ciudadanía digital, elemento clave de la formación ciudadana – El Mostrador


Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian

Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian.

police gangs surveillance Stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional in 2013. Illustration: Rob Dobi

Taylonn Murphy is sitting in a Harlem beauty salon after hours. Leaning back in his chair and with a calm demeanor, he is talking about keeping young local people out of harm’s way.

Every now and then though, as he speaks, his voice breaks.

In September 2011, his daughter Tayshana, 18, a local basketball superstar and resident of West Harlem’s Grant Houses, was shot dead by two residents of Manhattanville Houses. The killing was described as the result of a rivalry between the two housing projects that dates back decades.

Almost three years after his daughter’s death, on 4 June 2014, helicopters hovered overhead as the first rays of sunlight hit the concrete. At least 400 New York police officers in military gear raided both housing projects, with indictments for the arrest of 103 people.

Starting in January 2010, the community’s children and young adults had been closely watched by police officers – both online and off. The investigation had involved listening in to 40,000 calls from correctional facilities, watching hours of surveillance video, and reviewing over 1m online social media pages.

For Murphy, the revelation of these details was choking: the NYPD had been attentively surveilling both communities for over one and a half years before his daughter was murdered, patiently waiting and observing as the rivalry between crew members escalated.

Online surveillance: the new stop-and-frisk?

In 2013, stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional by a federal judge for its use of racial profiling. Since then, logged instances have dropped from an astonishing 685,000 in 2011 to just 46,000 in 2014. But celebrations may be premature, with local policing increasingly moving off the streets and migrating online.

In 2012, the NYPD declared a war on gangs across the city with Operation Crew Cut. The linchpin of the operation’s activities is the sweeping online surveillance of individuals as young as 10 years old deemed to be members of crews and gangs.

This move is being criticized by an increasing number of community members and legal scholars, who see it as an insidious way of justifying the monitoring of young men and boys of color in low-income communities.


'This.' sucks: why you need to stop using the internet's worst one-word sentence | Media | The Guardian

‘This.’ sucks: why you need to stop using the internet’s worst one-word sentence | Media | The Guardian.This.

 

 ‘This.’ This. Photograph: Screengrab

This. is the buzziest social media site. No, not this. This.cm is a platform in which users can only share a single link a day, in an attempt to still the white noise of information overload. This misses the point of the internet, which is the exponential proliferation of ideas, and pithy clips of cats being bastards. But ​I was struck by the name, which references a piece of internet slang that is uniquely annoying and sinister, like someone wearing a balaclava at a buffet.

What is it about online speech ​that can be so irritating? I’m not glad you asked. Writing about slang is thankless and futile and slides into irrelevancy faster than tea cools. ​In the meme-age, it shapeshifts like a chameleon on mephedrone. In gaming communities, slang breeds in its own microbial culture, spawning rapidly, mutating, and dying unobserved to the outer world.

But some slang sticks around long enough, or gets big enough, that we actually notice it, even if we don’t understand it. It invariably sparks a lot of anger, despair, and the wailing certainty that English has died, young people now communicate by drawing on each other in virtual crayons, and in 30 years will all be speaking in some kind of bastard binary​.


The great pop power shift: how online armies replaced fan clubs | Music | The Guardian

The great pop power shift: how online armies replaced fan clubs | Music | The Guardian.

Duran Duran are suing the managers of their fan club. But in an age when teenagers would rather have a selfie with a star than their autograph, what are fan clubs even for?
fans

One Direction fans struggle to hold it all together at one of the group’s concerts. Photograph: Craig Warga/Getty Images

The relationship between musician and fan has always been built on a farce inside a nonsense, but in recent years this relationship has contorted in strange and unexpected new ways.

Last month, news broke that Duran Duran are suing the managers of their fan club. It sounded like a pop bulletin from another planet: who would have a fan club in 2014? When fan armies can assemble online and enjoy what they believe to be direct contact with their idol of choice, the legal actions of Le Bon et al offer a stark reminder of how far fandom has come.

Back in Duran Duran’s heyday, when strict lines were drawn between fan and band, a fan club – £15 a year for some photocopied mailouts, a badge and a membership card – seemed like the best way of keeping up to date with a pop star’s movements. By the 1990s, the prevalence of direct mail (most seeming to originate from Trinity Street, a company that once boasted a database of six million UK pop fans) made subscribing to an artist’s mailshots more like a marketing exercise. In the past 10 years, with letterboxes viewed by teenagers as little more than takeaway menu delivery enablers, pop stars have been able to offer unmediated, real-time updates of what they have for lunch.

But any sense of passivity has fallen out of fandom as power has shifted from the artist to the fans. It is now fans, not necessarily musicians, who have the disposable income. And artists need fans to do more than buy music, invest in concert tickets and – and here’s a phrase nobody wants to see in their Twitter feed – “pre-order the single on iTunes”. They need them to repeatedly watch videos – with monetised pre-roll ads – on Vevo and YouTube: the higher the play count, the more an artist can charge for product placement in the next one. They also need them to click the “heart” icon on blog aggregator The Hype Machine so that more blogs write about the song.

And while bombarding radio stations with requests to play a new single may be rather old hat, a more sophisticated (and completely absurd) strategy is now in place. Artists offer fans incentives to (mis)use the song recognition service Shazam to tag a song whose identity they know all too well so that Shazam’s charts mislead radio playlist controllers into thinking that a song is reacting well with the wider public and must therefore receive higher rotation.

The more awareness there is of an artist, the more traction they have on social media; the more fans they have, the more they can make from endorsements. So it’s alarming to listen to some artists talking candidly in private about their fans. Backstage, lovingly purchased gifts are mocked or scooped into black bin bags. Musicians are disappointed that their fans are too old or embarrassed that their fans are too young. Fans are too gay or too female or too ugly. Sometimes, despite huge resources being spent whipping them into a frenzy, fans are seen as too intense and too annoying. Some artists would argue that they really do love their fans. Would they choose to spend a night in the pub with these fans? No. Do they want these fans to believe they would? Yes.


Facebook: Mike Matas, el joven detrás de Paper | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Facebook: Mike Matas, el joven detrás de Paper | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.


Mike Matas, en el centro, junto al equipo de Push Pop Press. / R. J. C.

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La cita es en un café de San Francisco donde venden complementos para bicis y sandwiches orgánicos, el Mojo. Con una taza de caffé latteva desgranando las claves de su próximo trabajo, Push Pop Press, la primera aplicación de lectura para iPhone e iPad que simula un libro. Era febrero de 2011.

El trabajo de Mike Matas (Seattle, 1986) asombró en cuanto se publicóel libro para para frenar el cambio climático de Al Gore para iPad. Un mes después Apple destacó a Push Pop Press como la mejor aplicación del año.

Han pasado tres años y Matas ya no trabaja por libre, ni para Apple. Trabaja para Facebook. Él ahora es el autor de Paper, la aplicación estrella que acaba de lanzar Facebook con ocasión de su décimo aniversario; pero volvamos atrás.


A grown-up's guide to sexting (or, why you should stop worrying about your teenagers get up to online) | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett | Comment is free | The Guardian

A grown-up’s guide to sexting (or, why you should stop worrying about your teenagers get up to online) | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Adult angst about teenage sexuality has reached fever pitch. Let’s get back to basics

 

 

Girl texting

‘A Greek friend finds it hilarious that the British government has time to wade into the private sexual lives of its subjects.’ Photograph: Reggie Casagrande/Getty Images

 

What’s the big deal about sexting? Teenager Aminah Appiah doesn’t think it’s such a problem, having this week told Newsnight that “it’s just one of the ways my friends communicate”, with the typical nonchalance of the adolescent. Yeah, so what? Enough with the news segments and the studies and the talking heads; it’s just a picture of some boobs. Innit?

She’s right, of course. Just what is it about the electronic transfer of sexual words and images between teenagers that interests so many adults? A Greek friend of mine finds it hilarious that the British government even has time to wade into the private sexual lives of its subjects. Some Americans I was in a bar with last night were baffled by the whole debate. They thought I was talking about politicians sending pictures of their wieners to each other. When they realised I was talking about private citizens, they visibly switched off.

The hysteria regarding what teenagers get up to on the internet has been building for some time, of course, but it has now reached fever pitch. This week it was announced that Facebook had changed its privacy settings for teens, allowing them to share photos and status updates with the general public – thus making them vulnerable to a cohort of paedophiles, revenge-porn pedlars and human traffickers, all of whom will presumably be fascinated by all those status updates about X Factor, Chessington World of Adventures and the bare mayo in a Kentucky Fried Chicken tower burger.


El drama de los niños que sufren abusos por internet – El Mostrador

El drama de los niños que sufren abusos por internet – El Mostrador.

20 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 2013

Cientos de menores han sido víctimas de abusos y extorsiones por la web

Los abusadores en línea convencen a las víctimas para que se exhiban, lleven a cabo actos sexuales o compartan las imágenes, y luego los amenazan con difundir las fotografías entre sus familiares y amigos, salvo que realicen algún acto más extremo aún, advirtió el Centro de Explotación Infantil y Protección Online (CEOP, en sus siglas en inglés) de Reino Unido.

A Daniel Perry le dijeron que sus conversaciones comprometedoras por webcam habían sido grabadas y serían difundidas entre sus amigos y su familia, a menos que pagara miles de dólares en efectivo.

Un grupo de abusadores en internet lo habían engañado para que pensara que estaba chateando con una chica estadounidense de su edad.

Desesperado, el adolescente escocés de 17 años se quitó la vida este verano boreal.

Pero el suyo no ha sido el único caso. Este tipo de amenazas se repiten en todo el mundo.

Los abusadores en línea convencen a las víctimas para que se exhiban, lleven a cabo actos sexuales o compartan las imágenes, y luego los amenazan con difundir las fotografías entre sus familiares y amigos, salvo que realicen algún acto más extremo aún, advirtió el Centro de Explotación Infantil y Protección Online (CEOP, en sus siglas en inglés) de Reino Unido.

El círculo vicioso parece no tener fin.