The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian

The practice of spreading facts to counter falsehoods has been hailed as way to counter ‘fake news’, but on the front line the picture is becoming confused

Fuente: Fact-checkers are weapons in the post-truth wars, but they’re not all on one side | Media | The Guardian


Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The debate about “fake news” and the “post-truth” society we now supposedly inhabit has become the epistemological version of a feeding frenzy: so much heat, so little light. Two things about it are particularly infuriating. The first is the implicit assumption that “truth” is somehow a straightforward thing and our problem is that we just can’t be bothered any more to find it. The second is the failure to appreciate that the profitability, if not the entire business model, of both Google and Facebook depends critically on them not taking responsibility for what passes through their servers. So hoping that these companies will somehow fix the problem is like persuading turkeys to look forward to Christmas.

Fuente: Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False

one’s views of Assange are completely irrelevant to this article, which is not about Assange. This article, instead, is about a report published this week by The Guardian that recklessly attributed to Assange comments that he did not make. This article is about how those false claims — fabrications, really — were spread all over the internet by journalists, causing hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) to consume false news. The purpose of this article is to underscore, yet again, that those who most flamboyantly denounce Fake News, and want Facebook and other tech giants to suppress content in the name of combating it, are often the most aggressive and self-serving perpetrators of it.

Fuente: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False


La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador

Y pese a que la prensa mayoritaria lo negaba en forma maniaca, los correos filtrados por Wikileaks eran viralizados por las redes sociales, dando cuenta de una serie de situaciones como las siguientes: cerca de la mitad de las personas que lograron tener acceso a Hillary Clinton mientras era Secretaria de Estado, habían hecho, en los días previos, importantes donaciones a la Fundación Clinton (pay to play); su jefe de campaña era al mismo tiempo lobbista de los gobiernos de Arabia Saudita y Qatar (acusados de ser financistas de ISIS), para los cuales consiguió millonarias ventas de armas (durante el periodo en que Clinton fue Secretaria de Estado las exportaciones de armas duplicaron a las realizadas en tiempos de Bush).

Fuente: La corrupción y la caída final de los Clinton – El Mostrador


#Supermoonfail: internet’s worst photographs of the perigee full moon | Science | The Guardian

Not one of the lucky few who managed to capture the perfect shot of the supermoon? Console yourself with this parade of rubbish pictures

Fuente: #Supermoonfail: internet’s worst photographs of the perigee full moon | Science | The Guardian


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos

SOFT ROBOTS THAT can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Fuente: The CIA Is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos


From Britain to Beijing: how governments manipulate the internet | World news | The Guardian

From Britain to Beijing: how governments manipulate the internet | World news | The Guardian.

 putin internet A growing army of netizens have mobilised to protect Putin’s policies online, but evidence suggests they are not the only ones. Photograph: Denis Sinyakov/AFP/Getty Images

Moscow has been accused of financing an “army of trolls” to post pro-Russian opinions across the internet, The Kremlin, however, is not the only government intent on using the web to promote a particular point of view. Here is what some of the others are doing:


Extraños en mi Twitter | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Extraños en mi Twitter | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

El servicio añade contenido de personas a las que no se sigue sin previo aviso

A

La obsesión por hacer que los usuarios pasen más y más tiempo en su servicio ha hecho que Twitter rompa una de sus premisas iniciales. El ‘timeline’, lugar reservado para consultar el contenido de los perfiles que se siguen, ha comenzado a mostrar tuits de personas a las que no se sigue. Un movimiento que certifica el triunfo del algoritmo, del cálculo basado en los intereses del servicio y la inteligencia artificial, sobre la preferencia personal. De momento, se trata de cuentas cuyo contenido está relacionado con el que se ha escogido de manera manual, pero deja una puerta abierta a la inclusión de publicidad, a intercalarla sin consulta previa.

Este tipo de cambios se consideran normales dentro del servicio. A comienzos de semana decidieron convertir los tuits marcados como favoritos, normalmente para indicar que gustaron al lector o una manera de almacenar, en retuits, es decir, que enviaban a todos los seguidores.

La red social no ha emitido comunicado alguno, pero sí ha cambiado los términos de uso: “Cuando identificamos un tuit o una cuenta a seguir, o cualquier otro contenido que es popular o relevante, podemos añadirlo a tu ‘timeline’. Esto significa que, a veces, verás tuits de cuentas que no sigues. Seleccionamos cada tuit a partir de algunas señales, como su popularidad o cómo tus contactos lo están movimento. Nuestra meta es que tu portada sea cada vez más relevante e interesante”.


Los recortes de Google Brasil, tras la derrota ante Alemania | SurySur

Los recortes de Google Brasil, tras la derrota ante Alemania | SurySur.

jul212014

br derrota

El buscador de Internet eliminó resultados relacionados con la derrota ante Alemania por considerar que son ofensivos. Palabras como “derrotados”, “humillados” o “destruidos” quedaron bloqueadas, de la misma manera que quedó anulada la vinculación con “vergüenza”.

La ilusión de Brasil se vio truncada tras la abultada derrota frente a Alemania en semifinales. “Derrotados”, “humillados”, “destruidos”, ésas fueron algunas de las palabras más buscadas en Google junto al término Brasil. Sin embargo, el buscador no ofreció resultados relacionados con esas palabras, tampoco con “vergüenza” cuando se entraba en Trends, su herramienta para consultar las tendencias dentro del buscador en tiempo real.

Google ha creado una adaptación de su página de tendencias adaptada al Mundial; en la misma se muestran los resultados de los partidos, comentarios y curiosidades, así como las búsquedas más comunes antes y después de los encuentros. Para actualizar y publicar esta web han creado una redacción en la sede de Google en San Francisco, expresamente para el evento.

La intención de este grupo es usar las tendencias de lo que buscan los usuarios para, tras analizarlo, convertirlo en contenido social enfocado en conseguir difusión en Google+, Facebook o Twitter. Algunos ejemplos de este contenido podrían ser que, durante la final, junto a Alemania se buscaba la secuencia “cuatro estrellas”, haciendo referencia las que en lo sucesivo los teutones lucirán en su camiseta, mientras que junto a Argentina crecieron las búsquedas que tenían que ver con “mantener la fe”.

Sam Clohesy, responsable de este experimento, defiende la decisión de quitar las palabras negativas junto a Brasil. No se trata de una orden sino de una decisión que obedece a un sentimiento de compasión: “No queremos echar sal en las heridas. Una historia negativa sobre Brasil no va a tener necesariamente éxito en las redes sociales”. A diferencia de lo que sucede en el buscador, donde no se tienen en cuenta las sensibilidades, en esta herramienta se ha retocado el resultado real que marcaría la tendencia.