Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador

Tras el ataque al Parlamento Británico ocurrido la semana pasada, los políticos británicos han exigido que Whatsapp y otras aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea proporcionen acceso a la policía y fuerzas de seguridad para así poder monitorear conversaciones terroristas. Sin embargo, los expertos en tecnología discuten que abrir las “puertas traseras” de los servicios de mensajería popular, las cuales usan cifrado de extremo a extremo, arrojaría una serie de problemas.

Fuente: Gobiernos en guerra contra WhatsApp por su cifrado de extremo a extremo – El Mostrador


Don’t let WhatsApp nudge you into sharing your data with Facebook | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The popular messaging app built its reputation on putting users first. Now its corporate owners are looking for payback at our expense

Fuente: Don’t let WhatsApp nudge you into sharing your data with Facebook | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Alguien te mira: las miles de solicitudes que hacen los gobiernos para acceder a datos de usuarios de Facebook – El Mostrador

La red social precisó que el número de artículos restringidos por infringir la ley ascendió el segundo semestre de 2015 a 55.827, una cifra muy elevada en comparación con la del mismo periodo de 2014, que se situó en 20.568. La red social Facebook recibió en el último semestre 2015 un total de 46.763 solicitudes de acceso a datos de sus usuarios, un 13 % más que en el mismo periodo del año anterior, según informó la compañía estadounidence

Fuente: Alguien te mira: las miles de solicitudes que hacen los gobiernos para acceder a datos de usuarios de Facebook – El Mostrador


With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal

Although the police in Cairo sealed off parts of the Egyptian capital where protests scheduled on Facebook were to have taken place on Monday, opposition activists managed to stage brief rallies that resembled flash mobs, calling for an end to military rule and the cancellation of a deal to surrender two islands to Saudi Arabia.The fact that Facebook is now so closely monitored by the security forces prompted one leading activist to offer an online tutorial in how to use a new tool, the encrypted messaging app Signal, to help protesters find each other on the city’s streets, and stay one step ahead of the authorities.

Fuente: With Facebook No Longer a Secret Weapon, Egypt’s Protesters Turn to Signal


Sale de la cárcel un ejecutivo de Facebook detenido en Brasil | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El vicepresidente de Facebook para América Latina, Diego Dzodan, ha salido de prisión apenas un día después de ser detenido en São Paulo. Un tribunal ha revocado la orden de cárcel del ejecutivo, que entró en prisión el martes por orden de un juez de la ciudad de Lagarto (Estado de Sergipe, al noroeste del país). El magistrado acusó a Dzodan de negarse reiteradamente a revelar mensajes intercambiados en la aplicación de mensajería WhatsApp, propiedad de Facebook desde 2014. Según las autoridades, las conversaciones que requería la Policía Federal eran pruebas esenciales en una investigación sobre crimen organizado y tráfico de drogas.

Fuente: Sale de la cárcel un ejecutivo de Facebook detenido en Brasil | Internacional | EL PAÍS


Facebook executive arrested in Brazil over WhatsApp data clash – FT.com

Brazilian police have arrested Facebook’s vice-president for Latin America after claims the social network refused to co-operate with an investigation into drug trafficking, marking a fresh tussle between US technology groups and law enforcement

Fuente: Facebook executive arrested in Brazil over WhatsApp data clash – FT.com


David Cameron seeks cooperation of US president over encryption crackdown | UK news | The Guardian

David Cameron seeks cooperation of US president over encryption crackdown | UK news | The Guardian.

PM to ask Barack Obama to put pressure on US internet companies to work more closely with UK intelligence agencies

 

 

David Cameron talking on the telephone to US president, Barack Obama
David Cameron talking on the telephone to US president, Barack Obama, from No 10 Downing Street, London. Photograph: Sergeant Dave Rose/PA

 

David Cameron is to urge Barack Obama to pressure internet firms such as Twitter and Facebook to do more to cooperate with Britain’s intelligence agencies as they seek to track the online activities of Islamist extremists.

 

As he becomes the first European leader to meet the president after the multiple shootings in Paris last week, the prime minister will seek to win Obama’s support for his plans to secure a new legal framework to deny terrorists a “safe space”.

 

The prime minister arrives after he proposed earlier this week that British intelligence agencies have the power to break the encrypted communications of suspected terrorists and insisting that the likes of Twitter and Facebook do more to cooperate with Britain’s GCHQ eavesdropping centre.


El Ciudadano » “Hostil a la privacidad”: Snowden insta a deshacerse de Dropbox, Facebook y Google

El Ciudadano » “Hostil a la privacidad”: Snowden insta a deshacerse de Dropbox, Facebook y Google.

Edward Snowden ha arremetido contra Dropbox y otros servicios por ser “hostiles a la privacidad”, instando a los usuarios a que abandonen la comunicación sin cifrar y configuren la privacidad para evitar el espionaje gubernamental.

Snowden aconseja a los usuarios de internet “deshacerse” de Dropbox, ya que este servicio encripta los datos solo durante la transferencia y el almacenamiento en los servidores. El excontratista de la NSA recomienda en su lugar los servicios, por ejemplo, de SpiderOak, que codifican la información también mientras se encuentra en el ordenador.

“Estamos hablando de abandonar los programas que son hostiles a la privacidad”, señaló Snowden en una entrevista con ‘The New Yorker’.

Lo mismo ocurre, en su opinión, con redes sociales como Facebook y también con Google. Snowden apunta a que son “peligrosos” y propone que la gente use otros servicios que permitan enviar mensajes cifrados como RedPhone o SilentCircle.


The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can't let them make up the rules | Arjun Sethi | Comment is free | theguardian.com

The US government can brand you a terrorist based on a Facebook post. We can’t let them make up the rules | Arjun Sethi | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Innocent people’s lives are being ruined. Why isn’t anyone watching the watchlist? 

facebook surveillance illustration
Reasonable suspicion is based on a circular logic – people can be watchlisted if they are suspected of being suspected terrorists – that is ultimately backwards, and must be changed. Illustration: Joelle L / Flickr via Creative Commons Illustration: Joelle L / Flickr via Creative Commons

The US government’s web of surveillance is vast and interconnected. Now we know just how opaque, inefficient and discriminatory it can be.

As we were reminded again just this week, you can be pulled into the National Security Agency’s database quietly and quickly, and the consequences can be long and enduring. Through ICREACH, a Google-style search engine created for the intelligence community, the NSA provides data on private communications to 23 government agencies. More than 1,000 analysts had access to that information.

This kind of data sharing, however, isn’t limited to the latest from Edward Snowden’s NSA files. It was confirmed earlier this month that the FBI shares its master watchlist, the Terrorist Screening Database, with at least 22 foreign governments, countless federal agencies, state and local law enforcement, plus private contractors.

The watchlist tracks “known” and “suspected” terrorists and includes both foreigners and Americans. It’s also based on loose standards and secret evidence, which ensnares innocent people. Indeed, the standards are so low that the US government’s guidelines specifically allow for a single, uncorroborated source of information – including a Facebook or Twitter post – to serve as the basis for placing you on its master watchlist.

Of the 680,000 individuals on that FBI master list, roughly 40% have “no recognized terrorist group affiliation”, according to the Intercept. These individuals don’t even have a connection – as the government loosely defines it – to a designated terrorist group, but they are still branded as suspected terrorists.

The absurdities don’t end there. Take Dearborn, Michigan, a city with a population under 100,000 that is known for its large Arab American community – and has more watchlisted residents than any other city in America except New York.

These eye-popping numbers are largely the result of the US government’s use of a loose standard – so-called “reasonable suspicion” – in determining who, exactly, can be watchlisted.

Reasonable suspicion is such a low standard because it requires neither “concrete evidence” nor “irrefutable evidence”. Instead, an official is permitted to consider “reasonable inferences” and “to draw from the facts in light of his/her experience”.

Consider a real world context – actual criminal justice – where an officer needs reasonable suspicion to stop a person in the street and ask him or her a few questions. Courts have controversially held that avoiding eye contact with an officer, traveling alone, and traveling late at night, for example, all amount to reasonable suspicion.

This vague criteria is now being used to label innocent people as terrorism suspects.


More than 17,000 sign up to Austrian student's Facebook privacy class action | Technology | theguardian.com

More than 17,000 sign up to Austrian student’s Facebook privacy class action | Technology | theguardian.com.

Max Schrems, 26, is claiming €500 damages per user for data violations, including helping the NSA to run Prism

 

 

Facebook

Max Schrems says that most of the people who have signed up for the class action so far are from Europe. Photograph: Jim Young/Reuters/Corbis

 

More than 17,000 people have signed up to join an Austrian law student’s class action against Facebook over the social media group’s alleged violations of its users’ privacy, the student said on Tuesday.

Max Schrems, 26, appealed last week to a billion Facebook users to join a claim he filed at Vienna’s commercial court. Under Austrian law a group of people may transfer their financial claims to a single person – in this case, Schrems. Legal proceedings are then effectively run as a class action.

The response to his appeal has been “giant, much more than expected”, Schrems said, adding that most people who have signed up are from Europe.

“The emails and feedback have been really positive and what is interesting is that many people say finally someone is doing something in this direction,” he said.

Schrems is claiming damages of €500 euros (£397) per user for alleged data violations by Facebook, including helping the US National Security Agency to run its Prism programme, which mined the personal data of Facebook users, among others.

He is also seeking injunctions under EU data-protection law at the court in data-privacy-friendly Austria.

Some of those joining his cause are donating money, he said. “It is good to see that for most people it is not a matter of [getting] money but of advancing the matter,” he said.

Schrems, who already has a case involving the social network pending at the European Court of Justice, invited others to join his Vienna court action at www.fbclaim.com using their Facebook login.


The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger's Mobile App Terms of Service | Sam Fiorella

The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger’s Mobile App Terms of Service | Sam Fiorella.

Sam Fiorella

 

How much access to your (and your friends’) personal data are you prepared to share for access to free mobile apps? I suspect the amount is significantly less than that which you actually agreed to share when blindly accepting the Terms of Service.

Case in point: Facebook’s Messenger App, which boasts over 1,000,000,000 downloads, requires the acceptance of an alarming amount of personal data and, even more startling, direct control over your mobile device. I’m willing to bet that few, if any, of those who downloaded this app read the full Terms of Service before accepting them and downloading the app.

2013-11-30-Messenger.jpg

The Facebook Messenger app is a standalone version of the instant chat feature within the social network. You can easily access this within the Facebook app on your mobile device, but opening the full application also requires more memory, bandwidth, and battery life. As a result, Facebook offers this one feature as a standalone app in which you can instantly chat with your Facebook friends without having to launch the full Facebook app.

If you’re one of those 1,000,000,000 people who have downloaded this app, take a moment to read the following. I’ve posted, word for word, a few of the most aggressive app permission you’ve accepted.

    • Allows the app to change the state of network connectivity


  • Allows the app to call phone numbers without your intervention. This may result in unexpected charges or calls. Malicious apps may cost you money by making calls without your confirmation.


  • Allows the app to send SMS messages. This may result in unexpected charges. Malicious apps may cost you money by sending messages without your confirmation.


  • Allows the app to record audio with microphone. This permission allows the app to record audio at any time without your confirmation.


  • Allows the app to take pictures and videos with the camera. This permission allows the app to use the camera at any time without your confirmation.


  • Allows the app to read you phone’s call log, including data about incoming and outgoing calls. This permission allows apps to save your call log data, and malicious apps may share call log data without your knowledge.


  • Allows the app to read data about your contacts stored on your phone, including the frequency with which you’ve called, emailed, or communicated in other ways with specific individuals.


  • Allows the app to read personal profile information stored on your device, such as your name and contact information. This means the app can identify you and may send your profile information to others.


  • Allows the app to access the phone features of the device. This permission allows the app to determine the phone number and device IDs, whether a call is active, and the remote number connected by a call.


  • Allows the app to get a list of accounts known by the phone. This may include any accounts created by applications you have installed.


Compare the NSA's Facebook Malware Denial to its Own Secret Documents – The Intercept

Compare the NSA’s Facebook Malware Denial to its Own Secret Documents – The Intercept.

By 


Featured photo - Compare the NSA’s Facebook Malware Denial to its Own Secret DocumentsA top-secret NSA presentation reveals how the agency used Facebook to hack into targeted computers for surveillance.

On Wednesday, Glenn Greenwald and I revealed new details about the National Security Agency’s efforts to radically expand its ability to hack into computers and networks across the world. The story has received a lot of attention, and one detail in particular has sparked controversy: specifically, that the NSA secretly pretended to be a Facebook server in order to covertly infect targets with malware “implants” used for surveillance.

This revelation apparently infuriated Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg so much that he got on the phone to President Barack Obama to complain about it. “I’ve been so confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the US government,” Zuckerberg wrote in a blog post Thursday. “When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we’re protecting you against criminals, not our own government.”

That wasn’t all. Wired ran a piece saying that the NSA’s widespread use of its malware tools “acts as implicit permission to others, both nation-state and criminal.” Slate noted that the NSA’s hacking platform appears to be “becoming a bit more like the un-targeted dragnets everyone has been so upset about.” Meanwhile, Ars Technica wrote that the surveillance technology we exposed “poses a risk to the entire Internet.”

In response, the NSA has attempted to quell the backlash by putting out a public statementdismissing what it called “inaccurate” media reports. The agency denied that it was “impersonating U.S. social media or other websites” and said that it had not “infected millions of computers around the world with malware.” The statement follows a trend that hasrepeatedly been seen in the aftermath of major disclosures from documents turned over by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, in which the NSA or one of its implicated allies issues a carefully worded non-denial denial that on the face of it seems to refute an allegation but on closer inspection does not refute it at all.

Prior to publishing our story, we asked the NSA to explain its use of Facebook to deploy malware as part of a top-secret initiative codenamed QUANTUMHAND. The NSA declined to answer all of our questions or offer context for the documents. We went into meticulous detail in our report, which went through a rigorous fact-checking process because of the gravity of the revelations. What we reported, accurately, was that the Snowden files showed how the agency had in some cases “masqueraded as a fake Facebook server, using the social media site as a launching pad to infect a target’s computer and exfiltrate files from a hard drive.” The source for that detail was not plucked from thin air; it was rooted in multiple documents that refer to the technique in action, including the internal NSA animation that we published.

A particular short excerpt from one of the classified documents, however, has taken on new significance due to the NSA’s statement. The excerpt is worth drawing attention to here because of the clarity of the language it uses about the Facebook tactic and the light it shines on the NSA’s denial. Referencing the NSA’s Quantum malware initiative, the document, dated April 2011, explains how the NSA “pretends” to be Facebook servers to deploy its surveillance “implants” on target’s computers:

 


Fundador de Facebook afirma que el gobierno de EEUU es una amenaza para Internet – BioBioChile

Fundador de Facebook afirma que el gobierno de EEUU es una amenaza para Internet – BioBioChile.

 

Maria Elena (cc) | FlickrMaria Elena (cc) | Flickr

 

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

El fundador y director ejecutivo de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, dijo el jueves que llamó al presidente Barack Obama para decirle que el gobierno estadounidense está socavando la confianza en Internet con sus vastos programas secretos de vigilancia.

“Llamé al presidente Obama para expresarle mi frustración por el daño que el gobierno está haciéndole a nuestro futuro”, dijo Zuckerberg en un texto en su página de Facebook, en el que mostró su irritación con Washington, luego de las revelaciones sobre programas de espionaje estadounidenses.

“Desafortunadamente, parece que tomará un tiempo muy largo para que se dé una reforma completa”, lamentó Zuckerberg. “El gobierno de Estados Unidos debería ser un defensor de internet, no una amenaza. Debe ser mucho más transparente con respecto a lo que está haciendo, o de otra manera la gente creerá lo peor”, agregó.

Los comentarios tienen lugar un día después de la publicación de un informe que sostiene que la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional (NSA) imitó un servidor de Facebook, para inyectar un software malicioso a las computadoras con el objetivo de expandir su capacidad para recoger información.


How the NSA Plans to Infect 'Millions' of Computers with Malware – The Intercept

How the NSA Plans to Infect ‘Millions’ of Computers with Malware – The Intercept.

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Featured photo - How the NSA Plans to Infect ‘Millions’ of Computers with MalwareOne presentation outlines how the NSA performs “industrial-scale exploitation” of computer networks across the world.

Top-secret documents reveal that the National Security Agency is dramatically expanding its ability to covertly hack into computers on a mass scale by using automated systems that reduce the level of human oversight in the process.

The classified files – provided previously by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden – contain new details about groundbreaking surveillance technology the agency has developed to infect potentially millions of computers worldwide with malware “implants.” The clandestine initiative enables the NSA to break into targeted computers and to siphon out data from foreign Internet and phone networks.

The covert infrastructure that supports the hacking efforts operates from the agency’s headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland, and from eavesdropping bases in the United Kingdom and Japan. GCHQ, the British intelligence agency, appears to have played an integral role in helping to develop the implants tactic.

In some cases the NSA has masqueraded as a fake Facebook server, using the social media site as a launching pad to infect a target’s computer and exfiltrate files from a hard drive. In others, it has sent out spam emails laced with the malware, which can be tailored to covertly record audio from a computer’s microphone and take snapshots with its webcam. The hacking systems have also enabled the NSA to launch cyberattacks by corrupting and disrupting file downloads or denying access to websites.


Acusan a Facebook de interceptar mensajes privados de usuarios – BioBioChile

Acusan a Facebook de interceptar mensajes privados de usuarios – BioBioChile.


Franco Bouly (CC) Flickr

Franco Bouly (CC) Flickr

Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP
nombre colectivo contra Facebook, a la que acusan de analizar sus mensajes privados para transmitir datos a los anunciantes, según el texto del planteo al que accedió la AFP.

“Contrariamente a sus afirmaciones, los mensajes privados intercambiados en Facebook son sistemáticamente interceptados por la compañía para conocer el contenido de las comunicaciones de sus usuarios”, afirman Matthew Campbell y Michael Hurley, registrados en Facebook desde 2008 y 2009 respectivamente.

A diferencia de los mensajes en el “muro” de los usuarios, visibles por todos los “amigos” de la red, el objetivo de los mensajes privados es que sean leídos únicamente por sus destinatarios.

Sin embargo, cuando un usuario “escribe un mensaje al que adjunta un link hacia un sitio de internet (un URL), la compañía analiza el contenido del mensaje” y “busca informaciones que le permitan elaborar un perfil de la actividad en internet de la persona que ha escrito el mensaje”, sostienen Campbell y Hurley.

Los denunciantes, que presentaron la demanda esta semana ante un tribunal de California, donde Facebook tiene su sede, acusan a la red social de recopilar los datos sin el conocimiento de los usuarios y capitalizarlos al compartirlos con terceros: anunciantes, compañías de marketing y otros proveedores de datos.

Según Campbell y Hurley, las comunicaciones privadas en la red crean una oportunidad “especialmente rentable” para Facebook, porque “los usuarios que creen que se están comunicando mediante un servicio libre de vigilancia tienen probabilidad de revelar datos sobre ellos mismos que no revelarían si supieran que el contenido está siendo monitoreado”.

Esta práctica, de ser confirmada, constituiría una violación de las leyes que regulan la confidencialidad de las comunicaciones electrónicas.

Los parámetros de confidencialidad en Facebook y el respeto de la privacidad se encuentran entre las principales preocupaciones de los 1.200 millones de usuarios de la red social a nivel mundial.


Facebook ofrece a medios de comunicación tomar comentarios de usuarios – BioBioChile

Facebook ofrece a medios de comunicación tomar comentarios de usuarios – BioBioChile.

 

Sean MacEntee (CC) FlickrSean MacEntee (CC) Flickr

 

Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

Facebook ofrece desde este lunes a varios medios de comunicación la posibilidad de tomar comentarios públicos de sus usuarios sobre temas de actualidad publicados en la red social, un terreno que tradicionalmente ocupó Twitter.

Un par de herramientas de software, Public Feed y Keyword Insights, permite a los medios de comunicación socios de Facebook tomar comentarios publicados en la red social.

“Organizaciones de noticias seleccionadas pueden comenzar a integrar conversaciones de Facebook en sus programas o coberturas mediante la visualización de mensajes públicos de actividad en tiempo real sobre cualquier tema”, sostuvo en un blog el vicepresidente de operaciones en línea de Facebook, Justin Osofsky.