Facebook al desnudo: la nueva moralina del arte se apodera de Internet – El Mostrador

El ejemplo de Tunick resulta muy ilustrativo. Si la intervención hubiera sido esta semana, la consecuencia serían miles de cuentas bloqueadas y una perjudicial autocensura en los medios que comparten sus contenidos en las redes. Pero, más allá de la ficción, sin ir más lejos, hace pocas semanas la Revista Nos, de Concepción, sufrió una insólita censura cuando Facebook bajó uno de sus videos promocionales –con el cual buscaban conmemorar sus 21 años de existencia–, tras considerarlo “contenido para adultos”.

Fuente: Facebook al desnudo: la nueva moralina del arte se apodera de Internet – El Mostrador


Facebook’s satellite went up in smoke, but its developing world land grab goes on | Emily Reynolds | Opinion | The Guardian

I’m sure Mark Zuckerberg has noble intentions in democratising the web, but we should still be wary of private companies controlling the internet’s infrastructure

Fuente: Facebook’s satellite went up in smoke, but its developing world land grab goes on | Emily Reynolds | Opinion | The Guardian


EM internet users fail to warm to free but restricted services – FT.com

Just one in 10 mobile phone users in emerging markets has tried a “zero rated” service such as Facebook’s Free Basics, according to a survey that questions whether offering a free but restricted internet is the best way to connect the world to the web .

Fuente: EM internet users fail to warm to free but restricted services – FT.com


Angola’s Wikipedia Pirates Are Exposing the Problems With Digital Colonialism | Motherboard

Wikimedia and Facebook have given Angolans free access to their websites, but not to the rest of the internet. So, naturally, Angolans have started hiding pirated movies and music in Wikipedia articles and linking to them on closed Facebook groups, creating a totally free and clandestine file sharing network in a country where mobile internet data is extremely expensive.It’s an undeniably creative use of two services that were designed to give people in the developing world some access to the internet. But now that Angolans are causing headaches for Wikipedia editors and the Wikimedia Foundation, no one is sure what to do about it.

Fuente: Angola’s Wikipedia Pirates Are Exposing the Problems With Digital Colonialism | Motherboard


O Facebook quer "privatizar" a internet e o Brasil pode ser um grande aliado – ÉPOCA | Experiências Digitais

As autoridades da Índia barraram um programa do Facebook para conectar comunidades carentes. O mesmo que tem a simpatia do Brasil

Fuente: O Facebook quer “privatizar” a internet e o Brasil pode ser um grande aliado – ÉPOCA | Experiências Digitais


'Poor internet for poor people': India's activists fight Facebook connection plan | Technology | The Guardian

Ferocious momentum continues to build against social media giant’s bid to take charge of the country’s internet through a program called Free Basics

Fuente: ‘Poor internet for poor people’: India’s activists fight Facebook connection plan | Technology | The Guardian


Facebook’s reasonable vision of a wider web – FT.com

The internet has revolutionised the way we live and work but some 4bn people still lack access to it. One might assume that any initiative to make the world wide web truly global would therefore be welcome — but the CEO of Facebook, , has learnt

Fuente: Facebook’s reasonable vision of a wider web – FT.com


Facebook’s Internet.org effort hits India hurdle – FT.com

Facebook’s Internet.org effort hits India hurdle – FT.com.

US chairman and chief executive of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg gestures as he announces the Internet.org Innovation Challenge in India in New Delhi on October 9, 2014. Zuckerberg is attending a two-day Internet.org summit which will discuss ways to make internet access available to people who cannot afford it globally. AFP PHOTO / CHANDAN KHANNA©AFP

A series of Indian media and technology groups have walked away from Internet.org, the Facebook-backed initiative to help more people in the developing world get online, in a battle over net neutrality that is set to damage founder Mark Zuckerberg’s pet project.

Cleartrip, a prominent travel ecommerce group, became the latest to pull out, joining news channel NDTV and Newshunt, a media start-up. The Times of India group, which publishes the country’s most-read English-language newspaper, has also pulled some of its services from the coalition.

Internet.org provides free access to some but not all types of online information, raising the ire of those who say all content should be treated equally.The moves intensify a battle in India over net neutrality, a term used by campaigners who want all data online to be treated equally, meaning broadband and mobile companies should not charge different fees depending on the content transmitted on their networks.

The row over Facebook’s project follows a decision earlier this week by Flipkart, India’s leading ecommerce group by revenue, to withdraw from an app provided by Airtel, the top-ranked mobile operator by users, citing similar concerns.

Launched in 2013, Internet.org is a high-profile push by Mr Zuckerberg to bring the internet to those who lack it, largely in the developing world, via partnerships between Facebook and telecoms companies.

In India, which is also Facebook’s second-largest market by users, Internet.org linked up with billionaire Anil Ambani’s Reliance Communications.

These partnerships allow particular services or apps to be “zero-rated”, meaning users are not charged for the data required to access them.

Although this aims to make services such as healthcare advice more accessible, its approach has been criticised by net neutrality advocates.

Cleartrip announced its intention to quit via Twitter on Wednesday evening. “Time to draw a line in the sand, Cleartrip is pulling out of http://Internet.org & standing up for NetNeutrality,” it said.