El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador

Las grandes empresas tecnológicas como Google, Facebook y Amazon actúan prácticamente como monopolios. Así lo considera el académico Jonathan Taplin, quien advierte de los riesgos de prolongar esta situación, también para la democracia. BBC Mundo habló con él.

Fuente: El académico que cree que hay que terminar con el “monopolio de Google” (y hacerlo rápido) – El Mostrador


Facebook and Google were conned out of $100m in phishing scheme | Technology | The Guardian

google and facebook Not even two of the biggest US technology firms are safe from fraud, as the social network and the search company named as victims of sophisticated attack

Fuente: Facebook and Google were conned out of $100m in phishing scheme | Technology | The Guardian


Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian

It is crucial for a resilient democracy that we better understand how Google and Facebook are changing the way we think, interact and behave

Fuente: Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers | Technology | The Guardian


Las 25 noticias más censuradas 2015-2016 (04): ¿Cómo controlar las máquinas electrónicas de votación? | Resumen

Desde los algoritmos de motor de búsqueda (search engine) a las máquinas electrónica de votación, la tecnología ofrece oportunidades para la manipulación de votantes y de los sufragios de maneras que podrían afectar profundamente los resultados de una elección.

Fuente: Las 25 noticias más censuradas 2015-2016 (04): ¿Cómo controlar las máquinas electrónicas de votación? | Resumen


Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian

Google and Facebook have conveyed nearly all of us to this page, and just about every other idea or expression we’ll encounter today. Yet we don’t know how to talk about these companies, nor digest their sheer power.

Fuente: Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian


Media groups face up to how tech groups now call the shots – FT.com

The threat of being disrupted by a couple of young technology entrepreneurs with a smart idea has long been something that keeps leaders of established industries awake at night. But what happens when those geeks from the garage have the power and wealth of the world’s most powerful companies at their disposal — and they are moving with the pace of a runaway freight train?That is what the media industry is now facing. Most companies are manoeuvring uneasily, trying to find ways to co-operate with the digital platforms that are coming to dominate their world. But to judge by the discussion at events like the Financial Times’ digital media conference, held in London earlier this week, the challenges of adapting to the new world are only getting harder.

Fuente: Media groups face up to how tech groups now call the shots – FT.com


A letter to an ungrateful world from Google, Apple, Facebook et al – FT.com

The world’s leading technology firms are becoming increasingly unhappy at the backlash over their tax arrangements and efforts to regulate their activities. Tim Cook, Apple chief, flew to Brussels to lobby against a tax probe and Google and Facebook

Fuente: A letter to an ungrateful world from Google, Apple, Facebook et al – FT.com


'Poor internet for poor people': India's activists fight Facebook connection plan | Technology | The Guardian

Ferocious momentum continues to build against social media giant’s bid to take charge of the country’s internet through a program called Free Basics

Fuente: ‘Poor internet for poor people’: India’s activists fight Facebook connection plan | Technology | The Guardian


Facebook isn’t a charity. The poor will pay by surrendering their data | Technology | The Guardian

Facebook isn’t a charity. The poor will pay by surrendering their data | Technology | The Guardian.

 Facebook isn’t a charity. The poor will pay by surrendering their dataFacebook is interested in ‘digital inclusion’ in much the same manner as loan sharks are interested in ‘financial inclusion’: it is in it for the money. Photograph: DADO RUVIC/REUTERS

Luxury is already here – it’s just not very evenly distributed. Such, at any rate, is the provocative argument put forward by Hal Varian, Google’s chief economist. Recently dubbed “the Varian rule”, it states that to predict the future, we just have to look at what rich people already have and assume that the middle classes will have it in five years and poor people will have it in 10. Radio, TV, dishwashers, mobile phones, flatscreen TVs: Varian sees this principle at work in the history of many technologies.

So what is it that the rich have today that the poor will get in a decade? Varian bets on personal assistants. Instead of maids and chauffeurs we would have self-driving cars, housecleaning robots and clever, omniscient apps that can monitor, inform and nudge us in real time.

As Varian puts it: “These digital assistants will be so useful that everyone will want one and the scare stories you read today about privacy concerns will just seem quaint and old-fashioned.” Google Now, one such assistant, can monitor our emails, searches and locations and constantly remind us about forthcoming meetings or trips, all while patiently checking real-time weather and traffic in the background.

Varian’s juxtaposition of dishwashers with apps might seem reasonable but it’s actually misleading. When you hire somebody as your personal assistant, the transaction is relatively straightforward: you pay the person for the services tendered – often, in cash – and that’s the end of it. It’s tempting to say that the same logic is at work with virtual assistants: you surrender your data – the way you would surrender your cash – for Google to provide this otherwise free service.

But something doesn’t add up here: few of us expect our personal assistants to walk away with a copy of all our letters and files in order to make a buck off them. For our virtual assistants, on the other hand, this is the only reason they exist.


Jeff Jarvis: “Facebook y Google conocen mejor que nosotros a nuestros lectores” | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Jeff Jarvis: “Facebook y Google conocen mejor que nosotros a nuestros lectores” | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

El profesor y escritor anima a las empresas periodísticas a reinventarse y llegar a acuerdos con las grandes compañías tecnológicas

 

 

 

Jeff Jarvis

Jeff Jarvis, fotografiado hoy en EL PAÍS. / Ricardo Gutiérrez (EL PAÍS)

 

“Bueno, listillo, ahora que tu maldita querida Internet se ha cargado las noticias, ¿qué será lo siguiente?”. Jeff Jarvis (Washington DC, 1954) asume que gran parte de sus colegas periodistas ya no le ven como un colega, sino como un gurú, y no como uno cualquiera: el escritor, bloguero y profesor de periodismo fue uno de los primeros expertos que avisó del brutal tsunami digital que iba a arrasar el modelo de negocio de los medios de comunicación tradicionales. Autor de los libros Y Google, ¿cómo lo haría? y Partes públicas, Jarvis asume en un nuevo libro el reto de tratar de explicar a los periodistas cómo construir modelos de negocio sostenibles en una era en la que los medios han perdido el monopolio de la creación, edición y distribución de los contenidos.

 

Jarvis, que lidera el Tow-Knight Center para el Periodismo emprendedor en la Escuela de Periodismo CUNY, recibe a EL PAÍS antes de participar en el segundo encuentro de la Escuela El Talento, del diario Cinco Días, junto con el presidente de PRISA, Juan Luis Cebrián. Crítico con la tasa Google impuesta por el Gobierno español para compensar a los editores (“sólo conseguirá dañar a Internet”), Jarvis recordó que el primer periódico se publicó 150 años después de la invención de la imprenta, “así que aún no sabemos cómo será el futuro de las noticias”.


Europe is wrong to take a sledgehammer to Big Google – FT.com

Europe is wrong to take a sledgehammer to Big Google – FT.com.

We need nimble enterprises to operate on a level plain with US groups, writes Evgeny Morozov
The Google Inc. logo is displayed on a computer screen for a photograph in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Friday, July 6, 2012. Google Inc., the worlds largest search engine, is scheduled to release earnings data on July 19. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

I

t is the continent’s favourite hobby, and even the European Parliament cannot resist: having a pop at the world’s biggest search engine. In a recent and largely symbolic vote, representatives urged that Google search should be separated from its other services — demanding, in essence, that the company be broken up.

This would benefit Google’s detractors but not, alas, European citizens. Search, like the social networking sector dominated by Facebook, appears to be a natural monopoly. The more Google knows about each query — who is making it, where and why — the more relevant its results become. A company that has organised, say, 90 per cent of the world’s information would naturally do better than a company holding just one-tenth of that information.

But search is only a part of Google’s sprawling portfolio. Smart thermostats and self-driving cars are information businesses, too. Both draw on Google’s bottomless reservoirs of data, sensors such as those embedded in hardware, and algorithms. All feed off each other.

Policy makers do not yet grasp the dilemma. To unbundle search from other Google services is to detach them from the context that improves their accuracy and relevance. But to let Google operate as a natural monopoly is to allow it to invade other domains.

Facebook presents a similar dilemma. If you want to build a service around your online persona — be it finding new music or sharing power tools with neighbours — its identity gateway comes in handy. Mapping our interests and social connections, Facebook is the custodian of our reputations and consumption profiles. It makes our digital identity available to other businesses and, when we interact with those businesses, Facebook itself learns even more.

Given that data about our behaviour might hold the key to solving problems from health to climate change, who should aggregate them? And should they be treated as a commodity and traded at all?

Imagine if such data could accrue to the citizens who actually generate them, in a way that favoured its communal use. So a community could visualise its precise travel needs and organise flexible and efficient bus services — never travelling too empty or too full — to rival innovative transport start-up Uber. Taxis ordered through Uber (in which Google is an investor) can now play songs passengers have previously “liked” on music-streaming service Spotify (Facebook is an ally), an indication of what becomes possible once our digital identity lies at the heart of service provision. But to leave these data in the hands of the Google-
Facebook clan is to preclude others from finding better uses for it.

We need a data system that is radically decentralised and secure; no one should be able to obtain your data without permission, and no one but you should own it. Stripped of privacy-compromising identifiers, however, they should be pooled into a common resource. Any aspiring innovator or entrepreneur — not just Google and Facebook — should be able to gain ac­cess to that data pool to build their own app. This would bring an abundance of unanticipated features and services.

What Europe needs is not an Airbus to Google’s Boeing but thousands of nimble enterprises that operate on a level playing field with big American companies. This will not happen until we treat certain types of data as part of a common infrastructure, open to all. Imagine the outrage if a large company bought every copy of a particular book, leaving none for the libraries. Why would we accept such a deal with our data?

Basic searches — “Who wrote War and Peace?” — do not require Google’s sophistication and can be provided for free. Unable to hoard user data for advertising purposes, Google could still provide advanced search services, perhaps for a fee (not necessarily charged to citizens). The bill for finding books or articles related to the one you are reading could be picked up by universities, libraries or even your employer.

America will not abandon the current model of centralised, advertising-funded services; its surveillance state needs them. Russia and China have lessened their dependence on Google and Facebook, only to replace them with local equivalents.

Europe should know better. It has a modicum of respect for data protection. Its citizens are uneasy with the rapaciousness of Silicon Valley. But this is no reason to return to the not-so-distant past, when data were expensive and hard to aggregate. European politicians should take a longer term view. The problem with Google is not that it is too big but that it hoovers up data that does not belong to it.

The writer is the author of ‘To Save Everything, Click Here’

 


El Ciudadano » “Hostil a la privacidad”: Snowden insta a deshacerse de Dropbox, Facebook y Google

El Ciudadano » “Hostil a la privacidad”: Snowden insta a deshacerse de Dropbox, Facebook y Google.

Edward Snowden ha arremetido contra Dropbox y otros servicios por ser “hostiles a la privacidad”, instando a los usuarios a que abandonen la comunicación sin cifrar y configuren la privacidad para evitar el espionaje gubernamental.

Snowden aconseja a los usuarios de internet “deshacerse” de Dropbox, ya que este servicio encripta los datos solo durante la transferencia y el almacenamiento en los servidores. El excontratista de la NSA recomienda en su lugar los servicios, por ejemplo, de SpiderOak, que codifican la información también mientras se encuentra en el ordenador.

“Estamos hablando de abandonar los programas que son hostiles a la privacidad”, señaló Snowden en una entrevista con ‘The New Yorker’.

Lo mismo ocurre, en su opinión, con redes sociales como Facebook y también con Google. Snowden apunta a que son “peligrosos” y propone que la gente use otros servicios que permitan enviar mensajes cifrados como RedPhone o SilentCircle.


2015 sería el año de Internet gratis para todos gracias a los mini satélites

2015 sería el año de Internet gratis para todos gracias a los mini satélites

Este es posiblemente uno de los principales problemas o dolores de cabeza que tienen las grandes compañías tecnológicas. Empresas como Google o Facebook han llegado a tan algo número de usuarios que una de las formas más viables que tendrían para crecer sería precisamente conseguir que más personas estén conectadas.

 


Google y Facebook se reparten la mayor parte de la publicidad móvil

Google y Facebook se reparten la mayor parte de la publicidad móvil

Hablar de publicidad móvil es prácticamente hablar de dos compañías, Google y Facebook.

De acuerdo a las estadísticas de la firma eMarketer, ambas compañías dominan más de la mitad de la industria mundial, para ser más exactos, entre Facebook y Google se reparten unos dos tercios del total del mercado, para sera más exactos el 66 %.

Desde que Facebook se la jugó por la publicidad móvil, le ha ganado bastante terreno a Google, siendo los últimos tres años de vital importancia para la red social; en los últimos 3 años el dominio de Google ha ido cediendo a favor de Facebook, pues cuando en el año 2.011 controlaba un 52,6 % de la publicidad móvil, en la actualidad ha pasado a poseer el 46,8 %, una cifra que continua siendo bastante alta.


Google y Facebook lideran el mercado de la publicidad en dispositivos móviles – BioBioChile

Google y Facebook lideran el mercado de la publicidad en dispositivos móviles – BioBioChile.

 

Vista en EngadgetVista en Engadget

 

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP

 

El mercado de la publicidad en dispositivos móviles se duplicó en 2013 al alcanzar los 17.900 millones de dólares y prevé fuertes ganancias para este año, con Facebook y Google a la cabeza, dijo el miércoles una empresa de análisis de mercado.

La firma de investigación eMarketer dijo que el gasto de la publicidad en móviles se incrementó 105% el año pasado y prevé crecer otro 75% en 2014, a 31.450 millones de dólares.

Facebook y Google estuvieron a la cabeza del mercado, consiguiendo entre ambos captar ganancias por 6.920 millones de dólares en publicidad para móviles en 2013.

Google se mantuvo por encima de sus rivales, pero vio mermar su cuota en el mercado de 52,6% en 2012 a 49,3% en 2013, dijo eMarketer.

Las mayores ganancias fueron para Facebook, cuya cuota de mercado saltó a 17,5% en 2013 de 5,4% el año anterior.


El primer ministro turco considera prohibir Facebook y YouTube | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El primer ministro turco considera prohibir Facebook y YouTube | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El primer ministro turco, Tayyip Erdogan, el pasado 25 de febrero. / UMIT BEKTAS (REUTERS)

Enviar a LinkedIn8
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

El primer ministro turco, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, ha señalado que su Gobierno podría prohibir la red social Facebook y la página web de vídeos YouTube tras las elecciones locales previstas para el 30 de este mes.

En una entrevista emitida anoche por el canal ATV, Erdogan comentó la recién aprobada ley sobre internet que da al Ejecutivo turco la capacidad de bloquear páginas web sin pedir autorización judicial previa. “Hubo grupos conocidos que inmediatamente se rebelaron contra esta ley sobre internet”, comentó el primer ministro. “Estamos decididos, no vamos a dejar al pueblo turco a merced de YouTube y deFacebook”.

“Tomaremos todos los pasos necesarios y de la forma más precisa posible, incluyendo el bloqueo (de ambas páginas) debido a esa gente que incita a la inmoralidad y el espionaje por el beneficio de estas instituciones. No puede haber esa mentalidad de libertad”, aseguró Erdogan.

La polémica ley sobre internet y los comentarios anoche de Erdogan llegan después de toda una serie de grabaciones de sonido publicadas en YouTube y que presuntamente involucrarían al propio primer ministro en ciertos casos de corrupción y de abuso de poder. Aunque las conversaciones filtradas no han podido ser verificadas, Erdogan sí ha admitido la veracidad de algunas de ellas. En una de éstas, se le oye diciendo a un director de una televisión que retire una información que no es de su agrado. En otra, se le escucha pidiendo al ministro de Justicia que un tribunal condene a un empresario.


Google y Facebook se alían en el mercado de publicidad – BioBioChile

Google y Facebook se alían en el mercado de publicidad – BioBioChile.

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFPVista en idlebrains.org

Vista en idlebrains.org

La compañía publicitaria en línea DoubleClick, filial de Google, anunció el viernes que iba a cooperar pronto con otro peso pesado de Internet, la red social Facebook.

Google y Facebook son más bien considerados competencia en el mercado de la publicidad en línea. El primero había sido hasta ahora excluido de la red publicitaria del segundo, FBX.

Las razones de este nuevo giro no fueron precisadas en el corto mensaje en que Google anunció la noticia en su blog oficial.

Payam Shodjai, responsable de productos de DoubleClick, promete una “nueva forma para nuestros clientes de tener éxito en cooperar con Facebook para participar en FBX”.

“Las asociaciones han sido siempre clave para el éxito de Google, puesto que una ola que se eleva supera a todos los barcos”, comentó.

El anuncio se produce cuando Google superó por primera vez este viernes la barrera simbólica de los 1.000 dólares en el precio de sus acciones (+13,8%, a 1.011,41 dólares en el cierre de la bolsa). Facebook por su parte termina la semana con un nuevo récord histórico, a 54,22 dólares por acción (+3,85%).


La UE proyecta limitar la venta de datos por las firmas de Internet

http://tecnologia.elpais.com/tecnologia/2013/01/09/actualidad/1357732182_073854.html

Empresas como Google o Facebook podrían recibir multas de hasta el 2% de su facturación

Las compañías deberán pedir permiso expreso a sus usuarios

Oficina de Google en Nueva York. / ANDREW KELLY (REUTERS)

Las compañías de Internet como Facebook y Google tendrán que conseguir más permisos para el uso de los datos de sus usuarios si finalmente triunfa la reforma que prepara Bruselas para limitar la capacidad de las empresas para utilizar y vender esos datos, tales como los hábitos de navegación por Internet, a empresas de publicidad, especialmente cuando las personas no son conscientes de sus datos se está utilizando en ese sentido.

“Los usuarios deben estar informados sobre lo que ocurre con sus datos “, dijo Jan Philipp Albrecht, un diputado alemán del Parlamento Europeo, que está impulsando la reforma. “Ellos deben tener la capacidad de llegar a un acuerdo consciente con el procesamiento de sus datos o rechazar el uso de los mismos”


El G-20 intenta poner coto a las prácticas fiscales de empresas como Apple o Google

http://economia.elpais.com/economia/2012/11/06/actualidad/1352223173_737799.html

Alemania, Reino Unido y Francia lideran la ofensiva para que las empresas no eludan impuestos

La OCDE elaborará un informe para la reunión de febrero en Rusia

El secretario general de la OCDE, Ángel Gurría, tras la reunión del G-20 en México de este lunes. / YURI CORTEZ (AFP)

Empresas como Apple o Google facturan desde Irlanda sus ventas para aprovechar los resquicios que deja la normativa fiscal y pagar menos impuestos. La compañía fundada por Steve Jobs acaba de hacer público que tributó menos del 2% por sus beneficios en el extranjero. Google paga poco más del 3%. Facebook, Starbucks, Amazon o Microsoft usan también paraísos fiscales, zonas de baja tributación o maniobras de ingeniería fiscal para apenas pagar impuestos. En numerosos países europeos se observa con preocupación este fenómeno. Los principales países desarrollados y emergentes se han puesto de acuerdo para intentar evitar los abusos de las multinacionales para no pagar impuestos. El tema se ha planteado en la reunión de ministros de Economía y Finanzas celebrada en México este lunes.


Gigantes tecnológicos, enanos tributarios

http://economia.elpais.com/economia/2012/11/23/actualidad/1353702423_564230.html

Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Ebay y Amazon que venden miles de millones en España pagaron solo 25 millones a Hacienda en los tres últimos años

El tamaño sí importa. Al menos a la hora de pagar impuestos. Las filiales españolas de las principales multinacionales tecnológicas reducen al máximo su factura tributaria aplicando una “planificación fiscal agresiva”, término con el que Hacienda califica la ingeniería fiscal que utilizan estos grupos para evitar pagar impuestos.

Las sucursales españolas de siete gigantes tecnológicas (Yahoo, Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Ebay y Amazon) pagaron 25 millones de impuestos sobre su beneficio en los tres últimos años a pesar de que generaron en España negocios por miles de millones de euros por la venta de sus productos y servicios. Estas compañías desplazaron la mayor parte de los ingresos a otros países con fiscalidad más reducida. Estas empresas se sirven de operaciones con otras filiales extranjeras del grupo, en países como Irlanda, Luxemburgo o Suiza, para transferir sus beneficios a zonas con una fiscalidad más ventajosa o con facilidades para montar estructuras empresariales y trasladar los beneficios a paraísos fiscales donde casi no tendrán que pagar al fisco.