A normalization of violence: how cyberbullying began and how to fight it | Life and style | The Guardian

Everyday on the internet, people – disproportionately women, people of color and queer people – are abused. How did we get here and what can we do about it?

Fuente: A normalization of violence: how cyberbullying began and how to fight it | Life and style | The Guardian


We need to talk about the online radicalisation of young, white men | Abi Wilkinson | Opinion | The Guardian

With the appointment of Breitbart News’s chair to Trump’s staff we need to be clear about the links between misogyny, racism and neofascism on alt-right websites

Fuente: We need to talk about the online radicalisation of young, white men | Abi Wilkinson | Opinion | The Guardian


Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian

Is the online surveillance of black teenagers the new stop-and-frisk? | US news | The Guardian.

police gangs surveillance Stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional in 2013. Illustration: Rob Dobi

Taylonn Murphy is sitting in a Harlem beauty salon after hours. Leaning back in his chair and with a calm demeanor, he is talking about keeping young local people out of harm’s way.

Every now and then though, as he speaks, his voice breaks.

In September 2011, his daughter Tayshana, 18, a local basketball superstar and resident of West Harlem’s Grant Houses, was shot dead by two residents of Manhattanville Houses. The killing was described as the result of a rivalry between the two housing projects that dates back decades.

Almost three years after his daughter’s death, on 4 June 2014, helicopters hovered overhead as the first rays of sunlight hit the concrete. At least 400 New York police officers in military gear raided both housing projects, with indictments for the arrest of 103 people.

Starting in January 2010, the community’s children and young adults had been closely watched by police officers – both online and off. The investigation had involved listening in to 40,000 calls from correctional facilities, watching hours of surveillance video, and reviewing over 1m online social media pages.

For Murphy, the revelation of these details was choking: the NYPD had been attentively surveilling both communities for over one and a half years before his daughter was murdered, patiently waiting and observing as the rivalry between crew members escalated.

Online surveillance: the new stop-and-frisk?

In 2013, stop-and-frisk was found unconstitutional by a federal judge for its use of racial profiling. Since then, logged instances have dropped from an astonishing 685,000 in 2011 to just 46,000 in 2014. But celebrations may be premature, with local policing increasingly moving off the streets and migrating online.

In 2012, the NYPD declared a war on gangs across the city with Operation Crew Cut. The linchpin of the operation’s activities is the sweeping online surveillance of individuals as young as 10 years old deemed to be members of crews and gangs.

This move is being criticized by an increasing number of community members and legal scholars, who see it as an insidious way of justifying the monitoring of young men and boys of color in low-income communities.