Defender los derechos humanos en el entorno tecnológico. Nuestra apuesta desde América Latina | Derechos Digitales

Derechos Digitales comienza hoy una nueva etapa de trabajo en defensa de los derechos fundamentales en América Latina. Nuestro camino se dirige a la identificación de un entorno cambiante para los usuarios, los gobiernos y la sociedad civil en general.

Fuente: Defender los derechos humanos en el entorno tecnológico. Nuestra apuesta desde América Latina | Derechos Digitales


With authoritarianism and state surveillance on the rise, how can civil society be protected from digital threats?

Policymakers have given a great deal of attention to the cyber security of governments, critical infrastructure, military targets and commercial enterprises. But civil society groups are also under threat, including human rights defenders, environmental activists, political watchdogs, and other groups promoting the rule of law and democracy.What can be done about these digital threats to civil society around the world?

Fuente: With authoritarianism and state surveillance on the rise, how can civil society be protected from digital threats?


A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald

NSA WHISTLEBLOWER Edward Snowden joined MIT professor Noam Chomsky and The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald on Friday for a discussion on privacy rights hosted by the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The panel was moderated by Nuala O’Connor, the president of the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Fuente: A Conversation on Privacy With Edward Snowden, Noam Chomsky, and Glenn Greenwald


We cannot afford another digital divide – FT.com

Cloud computing is one of the most important transformations of our time. Although when you think of it, you probably think of entertainment, gaming and messaging apps, it also has significant applications to health, education and development. But

Fuente: We cannot afford another digital divide – FT.com


Twitter puts trillions of tweets up for sale to data miners | Technology | The Guardian

Twitter puts trillions of tweets up for sale to data miners | Technology | The Guardian.

Company plans to make content generated by users available to commerce, academia and even police involved in crowd control

Twitter user about to start up Twitter on a phone
Twitter is quick to point out that ‘what you say on Twitter may be viewed all around the world instantly’. Photograph: Dominic Lipinski/PA

You are travelling by plane to see your newborn grandchild. As you board the aircraft, the cabin crew address you by name and congratulate you on the arrival of a bouncing baby boy. On your seat, you find a gift-wrapped blue rattle with a note from the airline.

In Twitter data strategy chief Chris Moody’s vision of the future, companies surprising their customers like this could become an everyday occurrence – made possible because Twitter is listening.

Computer systems are already aggregating trillions of tweets from the microblogging site, sorting and sifting through countless conversations, following the banter and blustering, ideas and opinions of its 288 million users in search of commercial opportunities.

It is not only commercial interests that are mining the data. Academics are using it to gauge the mood in a football crowd, and trying to shed light on whether Premier League players such as Manchester United’s Radamel Falcao are overpaid – with a team of researchers from Reading, Dundee and Cambridge universities testing whether top-flight footballers’ salaries are related purely to performance on the pitch or can be boosted by popularity on social media.

Selling data is as yet a small part of Twitter’s overall income – $70m out of a total of $1.3bn last year, with the lion’s share of cash coming from advertising, but the social network has big plans to increase that. Its acquisition of Chris Moody’s analytics company Gnip for $130m last April is a sign of that intent.

Google and Facebook have built their businesses around sharing data, but their control of our private and public information has become a source of huge controversy.


Facebook’s outage exposes our digital fragility | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Facebook’s outage exposes our digital fragility | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Today’s Facebook suspension shows how vulnerable digital information is – penetrable by hackers, governments or subject to random failures
Facebook logo as seen on its website
‘Any electronic device is subject to failure. Any locked door invites trespass.’ Photograph: Alamy

OMG Facebook is down! Down too went Instagram. It was just for an hour this morning, but the tweets screamed “Do I have to talk to someone real?”

In a manner of speaking, yes. Despite the hackers of Lizard Squad claiming credit, it is now clear that an outage at Facebook’s HQ was responsible. But the confusion was understandable after Lizard Squad had in recent weeks variously hit Sony executives and Microsoft products. It brought down PlayStation and Xbox platforms over Christmas.

Others such as Anonymous and LulSec have hit the FBI, the CIA, Britain’s NHS and the Australian government. North Korea appears to have hacked Hollywood and American security has hacked North Korea. Similar attacks are reported between Russia and Ukraine. Cyberwar is clearly in its infancy.

Admittedly, most such attacks are through denial of service rather than data theft, but as Wikileaks and Snowden showed, the thief is always a step ahead of the cop. Digital is inherently insecure. Anyone who claims otherwise is lying. Last year the NHS sought permission to store the personal data of every patient. It promised total security and guaranteed that any patient could opt out. Nothing would pass to insurers or drugs companies.

We now know it was not secure and that requests to opt out were simply disregarded. The NHS had lied.

The same must go for the Home Office’s desire to hoover up internet and phone records for “national security”, with the material going “only to the security services and the police”. What goes to the police goes to the public.


Facebook te seguirá manipulando, pero con más cuidado | Ciencia | EL PAÍS

Facebook te seguirá manipulando, pero con más cuidado | Ciencia | EL PAÍS.

La red social anuncia cambios en su forma de experimentar con los usuarios tras la polémica que provocó un estudio en el que fomentaron sentimientos positivos y negativos

ampliar foto

Los experimentos con usuarios serán supervisados. / Facebook

Durante una semana de 2012, Facebook sometió a casi 700.000 de sus usuarios a un experimento para comprobar si las emociones son contagiosas en las redes sociales. Para ello, provocó que algunos internautas vieran más publicaciones tristes y que otros vieran más noticias positivas de entre las que comparten sus amigos. El resultado fue que los usuarios se contagiaron aunque mínimamente por estos sentimientos, usando más palabras negativas o positivas en sus propias publicaciones. Cuando se conoció este estudio a través de una revista científica el pasado junio, se abrió una controversia sobre los límites éticos de este tipo de experimentos, esencialmente porque las cobayas humanas no sabían que lo eran.

Ante la avalancha de críticas, Facebook pidió disculpas y se replanteó cómo enfocar este problema: algunos temieron que cerraran su equipo de científicos sociales o que, sencillamente, dejaran de publicar sus experimentos: ojos que no ven, opinión pública que no se indigna. Ahora, tras tres meses de reflexión, la compañía que dirige Mark Zuckerberg ha anunciado que tratarán de cuidar mejor los límites éticos y la supervisión de estos estudios. “Estamos comprometidos con la investigación para mejorar Facebook, pero queremos hacerlo de la manera más responsable”, asegura en una nota Mike Schroepfer, director de Tecnología de la red social.


Difusión de fotos íntimas en Internet: la difícil misión de un proyecto de ley necesario – ONG Derechos Digitales

Difusión de fotos íntimas en Internet: la difícil misión de un proyecto de ley necesario – ONG Derechos Digitales.

Finalmente fue presentado ante la Cámara de Diputados de Chile el proyecto de ley que sanciona la divulgación de imágenes íntimas en Internet, anunciado hace varias semanas. Pero el proyecto revela varios de los problemas que conlleva regular el comportamiento en línea.

desnudoA pesar de sus buenas intenciones, el proyecto de ley que busca sancionar la difusión no autorizada de fotografías íntimas presenta algunas falencias que es necesario tomar en consideración.

El poder de la red para amplificar el impacto de los actos de expresión ha servido como herramienta para la actividad en línea de grupos sociales oprimidos, para revelar abusos de la autoridad o para organizar el disenso político masivo. Pero ese potencial no obsta a la habitual reproducción de patrones culturales y sociales propios del entorno analógico: como ya hemos expresado, los males del mundo “offline” se replican en Internet, permitiendo también la amplificación de actitudes discriminatorias.

Ellas incluyen la violencia de género, a través de prácticas como la difusión de imágenes de mujeres con la intención de cosificar, humillar, hacerlas sentir inferiores o culpables, como en el triste caso de una teniente de ejército o lafiltración de imágenes de actrices famosas, poniendo en evidencia, además, la invasión de la privacidad de la que algunos son capaces.

Es por ello que es importante que la sociedad en su conjunto reconozca que la violencia de género es un problema real, cuyo impacto puede ser exacerbado gracias a las herramientas que otorga Internet: la cosificación, el acoso, la transgresión de la privacidad e incluso de la violación de la intimidad mediante la intervención de las comunicaciones, de sus interlocutores o de los servicios que alguien utiliza. Y no solo eso, sino que la afrenta pública se magnifica en la red.

Una respuesta a ese problema intenta dar el proyecto de ley anunciado hace algún tiempo por dos diputadas de la Unión Demócrata Independiente, que busca sancionar a quienes divulgan contenidos sexuales o eróticos ajenos. No se trata de la grabación o las fotografías privadas no consentidas, sino de aquellas que, capturadas en la intimidad con el fin de quedarse allí, son divulgadas en Internet.

lalalalaEs importante que la sociedad en su conjunto reconozca que la violencia de género es un problema real, cuyo impacto puede ser exacerbado gracias a las herramientas que otorga Internet

Pero a pesar de sus buenas intenciones, una revisión minuciosa del proyecto revela varios de los problemas que conlleva regular el comportamiento en línea.


Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com

Edward Snowden urges professionals to encrypt client communications | World news | theguardian.com.

Exclusive: Whistleblower says NSA revelations mean those with duty to protect confidentiality must urgently upgrade security• Watch Snowden’s interview with the Guardian in Moscow• Read the full interview with Snowden by Alan Rusbridger and Ewen MacAskill on Friday

The NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden, has urged lawyers, journalists, doctors, accountants, priests and others with a duty to protect confidentiality to upgrade security in the wake of the spy surveillance revelations.

Snowden said professionals were failing in their obligations to their clients, sources, patients and parishioners in what he described as a new and challenging world.

“What last year’s revelations showed us was irrefutable evidence that unencrypted communications on the internet are no longer safe. Any communications should be encrypted by default,” he said.

The response of professional bodies has so far been patchy.

A minister at the Home Office in London, James Brokenshire, said during a Commons debate about a new surveillance bill on Tuesday that a code of practice to protect legal professional privilege and others requiring professional secrecy was under review.

Snowden’s plea for the professions to tighten security came during an extensive and revealing interview with the Guardian in Moscow.

The former National Security Agency and CIA computer specialist, wanted by the US under the Espionage Act after leaking tens of thousands of top secret documents, has given only a handful of interviews since seeking temporary asylum in Russia a year ago.

Edward Snowden during his interview with Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and reporter Ewen MacAskill Edward Snowden during his interview with the Guardian in Moscow. Photograph: Alan Rusbridger for the Guardian

During the seven hours of interview, Snowden:

• Said if he ended up in US detention in Guantánamo Bay he could live with it.

• Offered rare glimpses into his daily life in Russia, insisting that, contrary to reports that he is depressed, he is not sad and does not have any regrets. He rejected various conspiracy theories surrounding him, describing as “bullshit” suggestions he is a Russian spy.

• Said that, contrary to a claim he works for a Russian organisation, he was independently secure, living on savings, and money from awards and speeches he has delivered online round the world.

• Made a startling claim that a culture exists within the NSA in which, during surveillance, nude photographs picked up of people in “sexually compromising” situations are routinely passed around.

• Spoke at length about his future, which seems destined to be spent in Russia for the foreseeable future after expressing disappointment over the failure of western European governments to offer him a home.

• Said he was holding out for a jury trial in the US rather a judge-only one, hopeful that it would be hard to find 12 jurors who would convict him if he was charged with an offence to which there was a public interest defence. Negotiations with the US government on a return to his country appear to be stalled.


Social porn: why people are sharing their sex lives online | Life and style | The Guardian

Social porn: why people are sharing their sex lives online | Life and style | The Guardian.

From PornTube to Pinsex to Pornostagram, sex websites are following the lead of social networks, allowing users to like, share, repost and comment on each other’s pornography
Sharing information on smartphones

Nowadays people are happier to share, and that applies to porn too. Photograph: Tim Robberts/Getty Images

In his 2008 book, Click, online behaviour expert Bill Tancer declared that social media was overtaking pornography as the most popular destination on the internet. Those aged 18 to 24 in particular were replacing pornography use with more stimulating social networking pastimes. After the porn frenzy that was the first decade of the internet’s life, users seemed to be finding more “sociable” ways to occupy their time.

Five years later and social media seems to be firmly ahead of pornography in the race for internet dominance – social networking sites make up four out of 10 of the world’s most visited sites. Research from Pew’s internet project suggests that 90% of 18- to 29-year-olds in the US use social networking and 71% of online adults are on Facebook.

But it’s safe to say that pornography still remains popular. It’s notoriously difficult to come by reliable statistics on porn use or the porn industry, but Pornhub – one of the biggest online providers – claims to have had more than 14.7bn visits in 2013, with more than 1.68m visits an hour.

However, the line between porn and social media is beginning to blur. From Fuckbook (a porn version of Facebook) to Pornostagram (a porn version of Instagram), to PornTube (a porn version of YouTube), online pornography websites are increasingly starting to behave like social networks – encouraging users to share, like, rate, comment, curate and even create content.

Traditional social media sites have always struggled with the “pornography problem” – the peculiar fact that whenever a means for people to share things online is created, people will start sharing explicit material. It only took four days after Twitter launched Vine for a pornographic video to creep to the top of its “Editor’s Picks” list.