Rashida Jones, la mujer que quiere acabar con el porno… tal y como lo conocemos – El Mostrador

“La tecnología ha hecho que el porno se vuelva mainstream, parte de la cultura popular”, apunta la actriz y productora.Un cambio que está propiciando que, por ejemplo, los niños accedan cada vez antes a este tipo de contenidos.

Fuente: Rashida Jones, la mujer que quiere acabar con el porno… tal y como lo conocemos – El Mostrador


Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian

Google and Facebook have conveyed nearly all of us to this page, and just about every other idea or expression we’ll encounter today. Yet we don’t know how to talk about these companies, nor digest their sheer power.

Fuente: Facebook and Google: most powerful and secretive empires we’ve ever known | Technology | The Guardian


What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian

Feminist activists from around the world were in a conference room in Brazil, discussing what a feminist internet might look like. How did we get here?

Fuente: What does a feminist internet look like? | Chitra Nagarajan | Opinion | The Guardian


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador

El empresario preguntó a sus asesores y fue advertido de los riesgos que traería publicar un video de YouTube en el cual daba explicaciones: los memes y una visibilidad que nunca había tenido el representante de la fortuna más grande de Chile. Pero la decisión ya estaba tomada. incluida la que permitió a Yerko Puchento subirlo al columpio en su propio canal. “Lo que quise hacer fue algo nuevo, distinto y absolutamente abierto, para que todo el mundo tenga la posibilidad, corriendo el riesgo de ser atacado, mofado, todo lo que ustedes han visto. El tiempo dirá si fue una buena o mala decisión”, dijo Luksic.

Fuente: Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador


Google's Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian

Human development is too important, too complex, and too culturally diverse to be left to profit-driven companies acting in their own interests

Fuente: Google’s Jigsaw project has new ideas, but an old imperial mindset | Global | The Guardian


A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian

A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian.

David BowieA costume from a David Bowie exhibition at the Victoria and Albert museum in central London. The V&A is under-represented in the digital world. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

A cynic might say that we have the internet we deserve. We were promised a democratic platform for change, for equality, for collaboration, yet are faced with a reality of weary cynicism, as author Charles Leadbeater wrote last summer, and an assumption that we cannot trust any organisation with our personal data.

We were told of flourishing startups and opportunities for all, yet the internet has amplified global inequalities, says Andrew Keen, a writer on the internet revolution, using the parlance of openness and opportunity to create an industry of disproportionately wealthy entrepreneurs.

And as the meaningful engagement of governments in the lives of citizens diminishes, we stare into a dystopian future described by Evgeny Morozov: Silicon Valley is heading towards a “digital socialism”, where benevolent corporations provide all the health, education, travel and housing employees could ever desire, negating the need for state provision. Ice that cake with the unpalatable truth about the reach of our government’s surveillance services and we might think our internet is already beyond help.

Commercial interests have shaped the internet, and have created such powerful organisations that governments now struggle to keep up – out-funded, out-lobbied and outwitted. Rather than reflecting the real world, the internet absorbs and amplifies it, re-presenting a version of our lives, our work and our culture, from the gross disproportion of privilege and access afforded to those even able to access the internet to the misogyny that cripples meaningful debate. Even acknowledging its infancy, the internet does not represent a version of ourselves of which we can be proud. From privacy and surveillance to our collective cultural record, where is the internet we are truly capable of? Quietly, excitedly, and in a modestly British way, there is an alternative emerging. Rather than the internet as shopping mall – defined and dominated by commercial interests – how could we build the public park of the internet?


The internet has changed everything – and nothing | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | The Guardian

The internet has changed everything – and nothing | Deborah Orr | Comment is free | The Guardian.

In the real world people still torture and kill each other, all that’s changed is that they post it online

Teh Internet Is Serious at the Royal Court in London
How did we get here? … Teh Internet Is Serious at the Royal Court in London. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

Who saw it coming – a future that reanimated a dystopian past? Who could have believed, in the 1960s, that half a century on from Harold Wilson’s speech about the “white heat of technology”, young men in Britain would be looking at public beheadings on their laptops and, liking what they saw, resolving to join a crusade in the Middle East, a jihad against the infidel? Not me, that’s for sure.

In the 1960s, in our family, a telephone was something possessed by pathetic show-offs with more money than sense. We got along just fine without one. Now, I am indignant when my iPhone says “No service” or “Not delivered”. I am contemptuous of patches of retrograde air, air that is not crammed with all the information in the world, all of it sitting there patiently waiting for the few keystrokes that might summon it.

How did I get from there to here? I have only the vaguest idea. It all happened so fast – so fast that I do not know which of two things to be amazed at. Should I be amazed that information technology has changed the world so much? Or should I be amazed that it has changed the world so little?

I went to the theatre this week. Lots of people do. It has never been more popular. This play, Teh Internet Is Serious Business, was at the Royal CourtIts author, Tim Price, told the story of the defunct hacking group LulzSec and offered a dramatic interpretation of cyberspace in the process. What a strange thing – that this ancient artform should be recruited to animate life behind a screen. What a strange thing anyway, that in a world full of people with phones clamped to their ears, there are flocks of folk turning up at one of the increasingly few places where using a phone is seen as an inexcusable solecism. At the theatre, in the 21st century, one stands astride the old Elizabethans and the new.


Julian Assange: 'When you post to Facebook, you're being a rat' | Books | theguardian.com

Julian Assange: ‘When you post to Facebook, you’re being a rat’ | Books | theguardian.com.

Assange joins party for his book When Google Met WikiLeaks to discuss the consequences of Google’s power in the 21st century

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND - SEPTEMBER 15:  Julian Assange appears on screen to discuss the revelations about New Zealand's mass surveillance at Auckland Town Hall on September 15, 2014 in Auckland, New Zealand.  The general election in New Zealand will be held this weekend, on 20 September 2014.  (Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images)Politics
‘[Google chairman] Eric Schmidt is actually quite similar to me … Only he’s very banal,’ Assange said. Photograph: Hannah Peters/Getty

How does a wanted man have a book party? On Wednesday night at Babycastles, a Manhattan videogame-art collective, Julian Assange celebrated the publication of his new book, When Google Met WikiLeaks. He was present via videochat. The collectivists projected him on their walls. A crowd had formed to see the shining-haired hacker king – youngish New Yorkers, mostly. They stood or sat and drank beers as Assange talked about the internet.

Assange said: “Compare the mission statements of Google and the NSA – the NSA, who literally say, ‘We want to collect all private information, pool it, store it, sort it, index it, and exploit it.’ Whereas Google says, ‘We want to collect all private information, pool it, store it, sort it, and sell those profiles to advertisers.’ Really, they’re almost identical.”

He said, “Every time you go to a party and take a picture and post that picture to Facebook, you’re being a rat. You’re being a narc.”

Assange now wears a beard. It fuzzed as the feed wavered.

“People who use Google are the product,” he said.


Un intelectual rockstar en la cota mil – El Mostrador

Un intelectual rockstar en la cota mil – El Mostrador.

Está entre los 100 personajes más influyentes según la revista Times, debido a sus libros y series sobre la historia económica y financiera de la humanidad. El académico y best sellers expuso ante un auditorio lleno sobre los mil metros del nivel del mar lo que es su visión para entender la historia. Esto fue lo que pasó.

NF

La charla arranca en media hora, el auditorio está lleno y en la fila de atrás dos estudiantes discuten su futuro.

–Yo me quiero ir a Río de Janeiro, París o Singapur, cachai?

–Sí, pero ¿altiro?

–Sí. Me gustaría especializarme en economía, negocios, management y finanzas. Quedaría papo pos.

La divagación sobre el futuro de los estudiantes continúa pero se suman otros horizontes, como las universidades de Oxford, Columbia y Harvard. Mientras, en la primera fila se acomodan los académicos de la UAI: Lucía Santa Cruz, Andrea Repetto y Ascanio Cavallo, entre otros.

El ruido de conversación en el auditorio es total. Aparece Niall Ferguson, de traje, alto y con una barba que le da un aire marxista, según él, aunque no lo sea. Baja la escalera y el auditorio lo recibe con aplausos.

El historiador económico británico llegó hasta las faldas de la cordillera para ser incorporado al selecto club de académicos honoríficos de la universidad, entre los que se cuentan al Nobel de Economía y padre del liberalismo, Milton Friedman, y al otro Nobel y liberal, Friedrich Hayek.

Méritos no le faltan. Ferguson ha escrito cinco libros, una gran cantidad de artículos académicos y su exposición en TED del 2011 tiene más de un millón 352 mil reproducciones. Además, ha producido cuatro series de televisión entre 2003 y 2011 en las que expone sus tesis sobre el dinero, la civilización y el desarrollo de la humanidad. Su estilo directo y satírico junto a afirmaciones como que los “incas no tenían una percepción real del dinero” en el documental El Ascenso del Dinero, le han generado varios enemigos.