Gratuidad para educar a los protagonistas de la Revolución 4.0 – El Mostrador

necesitamos capital humano de primer nivel, profesionales capacitados, rigurosos, honestos en su trabajo, con una ética que nos permita generar la nueva narrativa y las formas de aplicar las tecnologías y las innovaciones sociales. De ese modo, esos jóvenes de la gratuidad retribuirán al país el que hoy puedan iniciar su viaje por el camino de la educación y el conocimiento.

Fuente: Gratuidad para educar a los protagonistas de la Revolución 4.0 – El Mostrador


Editor de The Economist anticipa en Chile la extinción de las actuales formas de trabajo ante la cuarta revolución industrial – El Mostrador

“Las computadoras han aprendido a conducir automóviles y entender el habla humana mucho más rápido de lo que anticipábamos que lo harían hace una década. Las capacidades que permiten a las computadoras hacer esas cosas también les permitirán hacer muchas otras tareas, ahora en manos de personas. Incluso si la inteligencia de la máquina mejora a un ritmo modesto en las próximas décadas, la cantidad de trabajo que pueden hacer las máquinas crecerá enormemente. Otro factor es, irónicamente, el estancamiento de los salarios. Veo un crecimiento débil en los salarios como evidencia que apunta a un exceso de mano de obra, donde es demasiado poco trabajo bueno”

Fuente: Editor de The Economist anticipa en Chile la extinción de las actuales formas de trabajo ante la cuarta revolución industrial – El Mostrador


Your new iPhone’s features include oppression, inequality – and vast profit | Aditya Chakrabortty | Opinion | The Guardian

Human battery hens make Apple’s devices in China. The company, which has a bigger cash pile than the US government, symbolises a broken economic system

Fuente: Your new iPhone’s features include oppression, inequality – and vast profit | Aditya Chakrabortty | Opinion | The Guardian


Las caras de la tecnología o la narcoeconomía – El Mostrador

Existe la dependencia que tiene toda la industria digital del mineral llamado coltán, que se produce mayoritariamente en la República del Congo. … Sí, ese es un de los temas que toca este artículo. Pero la verdad es que se pasea por casi todos … ; y también aborda lo que hoy está sucediendo en Chile … Es mucho … pero igual [AP]

Fuente: Las caras de la tecnología o la narcoeconomía – El Mostrador


Big tech stands with Black Lives Matter, but solidarity may be all about branding | US news | The Guardian

When prominent activist Deray McKesson was arrested Saturday night at a protest against the police killing of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, many saw the arrest as another example of the excessive policing of Black Lives Matter protests.Others saw a branding opportunity.

Fuente: Big tech stands with Black Lives Matter, but solidarity may be all about branding | US news | The Guardian


Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income | Technology | The Guardian

Silicon Valley has, paradoxically, become one of the most vocal proponents of universal basic income (UBI). Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen, web guru Tim O’Reilly and a cadre of other Silicon Valley denizens have expressed support for the “social vaccine of the 21st century”, and influential incubator Y Combinator announced on 31 May that it will be conducting its own basic income experiment with a pilot study of 100 families in Oakland, California – a short hop over the San Francisco bay.

Fuente: Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income | Technology | The Guardian


Only Humans Need Apply – Thomas H. Davenport, Julia Kirby – Hardcover

An invigorating, thought-provoking, and positive look at the rise of automation that explores how professionals across industries can find sustainable careers in the near future.Nearly half of all working Americans could risk losing their jobs because of technology. It’s not only blue-collar jobs at stake. Millions of educated knowledge workers—writers, paralegals, assistants, medical technicians—are threatened by accelerating advances in artificial intelligence.

Fuente: Only Humans Need Apply – Thomas H. Davenport, Julia Kirby – Hardcover


A universal basic income is an old idea with modern appeal – FT.com

When Andy Stern wanted someone to transcribe an interview he had recorded for a book, he posted the job details on upwork.com. He was pleased to receive almost instant replies from US freelancers as well as those from as far away as the Philippines and Sri Lanka. But whereas US freelancers pitched between $12.50 to $25 an hour, those elsewhere offered $3 to $7.50.

Fuente: A universal basic income is an old idea with modern appeal – FT.com


Digital advances uneven across US economy – FT.com

Large sections of the US economy are failing to make the most of digital technologies and millions more jobs are set to be displaced as companies do more to harness the innovations available to them, according to a new report. Research from the

Fuente: Digital advances uneven across US economy – FT.com


Unconnected and out of work: the vicious circle of having no internet | Society | The Guardian

Unconnected and out of work: the vicious circle of having no internet | Society | The Guardian.

 A jobseeker uses a computer at a Citizens Advice office in Newcastle.A jobseeker uses a computer at a Citizens Advice office in Newcastle. Photograph: Mark Pinder/the Guardian

In a modern-day version of the old casual labour scrum outside the local docks, Nick East scrambles for a free computer screen when the doors of Newcastle’s city centre library open.

The fourth floor computer room of the glass-fronted library is stocked with 40 terminals, plus a handful of iMacs. Even so, it’s almost always packed, with people waiting for a computer to become free for a designated two-hour slot.

“You have to get there very early or all the screens will be gone and you have to hang around,” said the 24-year-old, who has been unemployed for 18 months. “And you can’t afford a city centre coffee [while waiting], so you just walk about the streets.”

East’s need for computer time has nothing to with catching up with friends on social media, online shopping or video downloads. He must apply for 24 jobs a week – with applications taking up to an hour each – on the government’s digital jobcentre looking for work, or lose his benefits. When you don’t own a computer, this is no mean feat – as East has found out.

In an increasingly digital society, large swaths of the population – lacking computers, broadband, email addresses or even phones that function without regular cash top-ups – are discovering harsh consequences to being unconnected. About one fifth of households have no internet access, according to most figures,including those of the Government Digital Service, although the Office for National Statistics put the figure at 16%. At any one time, there are an estimated 10m pay-as-you-go phones without the credit needed to make calls or pick up voicemail messages.

“The primary reason people don’t have broadband is cost,” said Oliver Johnson, CEO of broadband analysts Point Topic. “It’s still expensive to buy all the kit you need, let alone the monthly subscription. Ironically, the cheapest rail fares and the cheapest goods are online – meaning poorer people suffer twice over.”

Meanwhile, the government is moving more and more services online. Significantly, universal credit, a benefit which will replace six means-tested allowances and tax credits, will be a digital-only service. Claimants are expected to apply online, manage any subsequent changes online, and contact between the government and the claimant will be made online.


Digital economy transforms UK workforce – FT.com

Digital economy transforms UK workforce – FT.com.

March 11, 2015 12:01 am

Digital economy transforms UK workforce

 

Ofifice lights illuminate commercial office buildings and skyscrapers, including from left to right, the Shard, 20 Fenchurch Street, also known as the "Walkie-Talkie," the Leadenhall building, also known as the "Cheesegrater," 30 St Mary Axe, also known as "the Gherkin," and the Heron Tower at dusk in London, U.K., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said the U.K. is just beginning to see a pickup in wages, a key metric for policy makers as they debate the timing of the first interest-rate increase since 2007. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

In central London 10 per cent of workers are employed in jobs that did not exist in 1990 but regional cities are rapidly embracing new careers, according to PwC’s 2015 economic outlook

The transformation of the workforce is rapidly expanding beyond London as the UK embraces the digital economy, with about 1.8m people — 6 per cent of workers — now employed in a type of job that did not even exist in 1990.

 

In central London 10 per cent of workers are employed in jobs that did not exist in 1990 but regional cities are rapidly embracing new careers, according to PwC’s 2015 economic outlook. Official classifications have added 1,500 job titles since then.

Carl Benedikt Frey, of Oxford university, and John Hawksworth, of consultants PwC, found that the proportion of workers in these new jobs in 2004 was a good predictor of relative rates of regional jobs growth during the following 10 years to 2014.

 

Based on similar projects, employment in central London should rise by about 25 per cent during the next decade, if there is sufficient investment in commuter transport links and affordable housing. That is down from 35 per cent in the past decade.

 

The biggest jump should be in suburban London, with employment growing 9 per cent in the next decade, compared with 2.6 per cent in the last.


Digitalización y desempleo, el nuevo orden | Opinión | EL PAÍS

Digitalización y desempleo, el nuevo orden | Opinión | EL PAÍS.

No estamos ante una suerte de Tercera Revolución Industrial. Las máquinas ‘inteligentes’ han hecho desaparecer modelos de negocio. Habrá que administrar racional y democráticamente el trabajo, un bien escaso

Enrique Flores

Un nuevo orden económico con serias consecuencias para el empleo se ha instalado entre nosotros sin que las autoridades europeas, por descontado tampoco las españolas, ni las patronales ni los sindicatos parezcan haberlo comprendido. Incluso en Estados Unidos, cuna y eje del desarrollo digital, están disparadas las alarmas. Las sinergias que se derivan del desarrollo de las ingenierías del software, robótica, telecomunicaciones y microelectrónica, han creado memorias más rápidas y baratas, mayor movilidad y ubicuidad de la información, máquinas inteligentesque combinadas con otras ramas del conocimiento como la medicina o la climatología, por ejemplo, han generado todo un universo nuevo: el de la digitalización. Un universo que, como ocurriera en su día con la electricidad, embebe los hábitos humanos y condiciona la cantidad y la calidad del empleo. Más que la sustitución del hombre por la máquina, es la aparición de nuevos productos y costumbres los que asolan muchos empleos.

Las implicaciones y preocupaciones de este nuevo orden han dejado de ser preocupaciones exclusivas de los tecnólogos. Los economistas finalmente les prestan atención (Foreing Affairs, julio-agosto; The Economist, 4 de octubre) y ya aceptan que el optimista principio de la “destrucción creativa de empleos” no se cumple esta vez. La pérdida de empleos provocada por la digitalización no encuentra contrapartida con la creación de otros que equilibrarían la balanza. Ni siquiera las start up, tan pregonadas como fuentes de empleo, funcionan. El pasado mes de septiembre, en Boston, la comunidad científica reconoció, a partir del censo americano de empresas, que aquellas llevan años reduciendo su capacidad para generar empleo. Las que sobreviven son autoempleo o tienen menos de cinco trabajadores. Instagram o WhatsApp no superan los cien empleados a pesar de haber alumbrado productos rompedores que fueron adquiridas por las “grandes ganadoras”, que pagaron cantidades fastuosas por ella. Pero esos ingentes desembolsos de capital no tienen traducción positiva en el mercado laboral. Unas inversiones similares durante la era industrial hubieran supuesto la creación de miles de puestos de trabajo. Cuando Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google, ante miles de emprendedores afirmaba hace unas semanas en la plaza de Las Ventas en Madrid que las start up generaban empleo no decía la verdad.

Mientras Schmidt, cuya empresa, con sus portentosos desarrollos tiene un modelo de negocio con preocupantes variedades de monopolio, niega la realidad, en Europa se la ignora directamente. Mario Draghi, presidente del Banco Central Europeo, en su conferencia en Jackson Hole del pasado agosto sobre Desempleo en la zona euro, no dedicó ni un minuto de la hora larga en la que intervino a analizar los efectos sobre el mercado laboral de la tecnología. Draghi se limitó a la tradicional relación entre política monetaria y empleo, ignorando que la economía actual no puede explicarse solamente en términos propios de la era industrial. Esta carencia apareció de nuevo en la reunión de Milán de octubre del Consejo Europeo, incapaz de concretar presupuesto alguno para “medidas activas en favor del empleo”, una expresión acuñada en lo mediático pero hoy vacía. Desgraciadamente, el empleo disponible, como la energía, es un recurso escaso que habrá que administrar racional y democráticamente. En la digitalización, la UE no sabe hacia dónde dirigir sus recursos. De hecho, muchos se preguntan si las líneas de I+D que financia, acaban siendo más productivas para las monopolísticas multinacionales digitales que para el empleo europeo. Una desorientación que puede llevar a repetir episodios como los vividos en España, que ha dejado la discusión a empresarios y sindicatos con muy dudosos balances sobre su eficiencia.

El autoservicio es una fuerza imparable que nació con la gasolinera

y el supermercado

La coincidencia temporal de la consolidación digital con la crisis económica complica el análisis cuantitativo de sus efectos en el mercado de trabajo; pero no parece temerario asegurar que la estructura laboral asociada a los extraordinarios desarrollos digitales implica que se destruyan más empleos de los que se alumbran. La digitalización no debe confundirse como una suerte de Tercera Revolución Industrial. Frente a los cambios que dieron resultados tangibles, el universo digital lleva a cabo también tareas cognitivas de resultado inmaterial. Robots, ordenadores y redes, conjunta o separadamente, han impregnado conductas haciendo desaparecer trabajos y modelos de negocio. El ritmo de cambio es impresionante: en la actualidad se hacen más fotografías en un minuto que en todo el siglo previo a la liquidación de Kodak en 2012, las relaciones interpersonales son radicalmente nuevas, existen robots que trabajan respetando la seguridad de la persona, cursos masivos abiertos y gratuitos que ponen en tela de juicio el formato de enseñanza universitaria, se atisba el fin de la Galaxia de Gutenberg después de cerca de seis siglos de existencia…


Los taxistas se movilizan contra las redes de transporte alternativo de Internet | Economía | EL PAÍS

Los taxistas se movilizan contra las redes de transporte alternativo de Internet | Economía | EL PAÍS.

 

Taxis en la Terminal 4 del aeropuerto de Barajas. / EFE

Lo que empezó como un conflicto gremial entre el taxi y las empresas que ponen en contacto a conductores particulares y usuarios a través de Internet ganó este martes varios enteros de una tacada con la irrupción de la Comisión Europea, el Ministerio de Fomento y la Generalitat catalana. Todo, en la víspera de una jornada de movilización de los taxistas que, en Madrid, pararán durante 24 horas en protesta por la llegada de aplicaciones de este tipo como Uber. Además, el sector realizará protestas por intrusismo en Barcelona y otras ciudades europeas en protesta por lo que ven como un claro caso de intrusismo.

Desde Bruselas, la responsable europea de Agenda Digital, Neelie Kroes, advirtió de que Uber, que pone en contacto a los particulares para organizar traslados de pago en automóvil no es el “enemigo” de los profesionales. La comisaria, que ya arremetió contra la prohibición del servicio en Bruselas hace casi dos meses, también rechazó medidas extremas como la adoptada por la Generalitat catalana, que exigirá el cese inmediato de la aplicación en Barcelona, la ciudad que acogió su estreno en España, y la amenaza de multas lanzada por Fomento. De hecho, el Ejecutivo catalán advirtió de que castigará cada infracción de la normativa de transporte de viajeros con multas de hasta 6.000 euros y el precinto del vehículo.

“Las huelgas no solucionan nada”, recalcó Kroes en referencia a la sucesión de los paros en Madrid, la concentración prevista también para hoy en Barcelona o los actos de protesta anunciados en otras ciudades europeas como Londres, Milán o Hamburgo. En su nota, la comisaria defendió la “innovación” que representan las empresas de transporte entre particulares. “Es el momento de que taxistas, reguladores y responsables de Uber se sienten a dialogar; nadie dice que sus conductores no deban pagar impuestos y respetar las normas de protección a los consumidores, pero prohibir Uber no les da la oportunidad de hacer bien las cosas”, subrayó la comisaria.

Un portavoz de su departamento fue más allá al señalar que, aunque a la Unión Europea (UE) “no le compete” entrar en el conflicto, el Ejecutivo comunitario sí tiene voz y esta es favorable a una economía “abierta a la innovación”.