Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election

While the document provides a rare window into the NSA’s understanding of the mechanics of Russian hacking, it does not show the underlying “raw” intelligence on which the analysis is based. A U.S. intelligence officer who declined to be identified cautioned against drawing too big a conclusion from the document because a single analysis is not necessarily definitive.

Fuente: Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election


‘Give them a pill’: Putin accuses US of hysteria over election hacking inquiry | World news | The Guardian

Russian president calls allegations of interference in US presidential election ‘useless and harmful chatter’ at St Petersburg economic forum

Fuente: ‘Give them a pill’: Putin accuses US of hysteria over election hacking inquiry | World news | The Guardian


Google forced to open up Android to rival search engines in Russia | Technology | The Guardian

Google has been forced to open up Android to rival search engines and applications in Russia, after settling a two-year battle with competition authorities for 439m roubles (£6.2m).

Fuente: Google forced to open up Android to rival search engines in Russia | Technology | The Guardian


Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian

We have to take action now to root out Russian and other foreign influences before they become too deeply enmeshed in our political ecosystem. First and foremost, leaders in the US and Europe must stop any attempt by the Trump administration to ease sanctions on Russia. It must be abundantly clear that attacking our elections through cyberspace will prompt a tough and proportional response.

Fuente: Russia hacked the US election. Now it’s coming for western democracy | Robby Mook | Opinion | The Guardian


Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian

Norway’s foreign ministry, army and other institutions have been targeted in a cyber-attack by a group suspected of having links to Russian authorities, according to Norwegian intelligence, which was one of the targets.

Fuente: Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian


Russian cybersecurity experts suspected of treason linked to CIA | World news | The Guardian

Two of Moscow’s top cybersecurity officials are facing treason charges for cooperating with the CIA, according to a Russian news report.The accusations add further intrigue to a mysterious scandal that has had the Moscow rumour mill working in overdrive for the past week, and comes not long after US intelligence accused Russia of interfering in the US election and hacking the Democratic party’s servers.

Fuente: Russian cybersecurity experts suspected of treason linked to CIA | World news | The Guardian


Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian

Earlier on Wednesday, Maria Zakharova, a foreign ministry spokeswoman, wrote on Facebook that Snowden’s right to stay had recently been extended “by a couple of years”. Her post came in response to a suggestion from the former acting CIA director Michael Morell that Vladimir Putin might hand over Snowden to the US, despite there being no extradition treaty between the countries.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian


Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian

The intelligence report’s lack of even hints at the kind of evidence collected make it difficult to assess the claims, and its weakness gave Russian officials ample opportunity to poke fun.The foreign ministry spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova, wrote on Facebook on Monday: “If ‘Russian hackers’ managed to hack anything in America, it’s two things: Obama’s brain and, of course, the report itself.”

Fuente: Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian


Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian

Alisa Shevchenko is a talented young Russian hacker, known for working with companies to find vulnerabilities in their systems. She is also, the White House claims, guilty of helping Vladimir Putin interfere in the US election.

Fuente: Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian


Por qué los servicios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos acusan a Putin de ordenar ciberataques – El Mostrador

La versión desclasificada no contenía ninguna prueba detallada del supuesto papel de Putin. Desde que ganó las elecciones, Trump cuestionó repetidamente a la inteligencia estadounidense por acusar a Rusia de haber hackeado al Partido Demócrata.

Fuente: Por qué los servicios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos acusan a Putin de ordenar ciberataques – El Mostrador


The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.

It’s plausible, and in my opinion likely, that hackers under orders from the Russian government were responsible for the DNC and Podesta hacks in order to influence the U.S. election in favor of Donald Trump. But the Grizzly Steppe report fails to adequately back up this claim. My research, for example, shows that much of the evidence presented is evidence of nothing at all.

Fuente: The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.


WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived

The most ironic aspect of all this is that it is mainstream journalists — the very people who have become obsessed with the crusade against Fake News — who play the key role in enabling and fueling this dissemination of false stories. They do so not only by uncritically spreading them, but also by taking little or no steps to notify the public of their falsity.

Fuente: WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived


Russia hacking: US intelligence chief hits back at Trump’s ‘disparagement’ | Technology | The Guardian

Yet neither Clapper nor Rogers offered new evidence for their October conclusion of Russian interference. Clapper promised to release an unclassified report early next week, prepared by the NSA, CIA and FBI, providing additional information for the intelligence agencies’ conclusion that Russia deliberately hacked the Democratic National Committee in order to aid Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

Fuente: Russia hacking: US intelligence chief hits back at Trump’s ‘disparagement’ | Technology | The Guardian


Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

Those interested in a sober and rational discussion of the Russia hacking issue should read the following:(1) Three posts by cybersecurity expert Jeffrey Carr: first, on the difficulty of proving attribution for any hacks; second, on the irrational claims on which the “Russia hacked the DNC” case is predicated; and third, on the woefully inadequate, evidence-free report issued by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI this week to justify sanctions against Russia.(2) Yesterday’s Rolling Stone article by Matt Taibbi, who lived and worked for more than a decade in Russia, titled: “Something About This Russia Story Stinks.”(3) An Atlantic article by David A. Graham on the politics and strategies of the sanctions imposed this week on Russia by Obama; I disagree with several of his claims, but the article is a rarity: a calm, sober, rational assessment of this debate.

Fuente: Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid


Obama escalates anti-Russian campaign with new sanctions and threats – World Socialist Web Site

In an executive order accompanied by a series of official statements, US President Barack Obama has sharply escalated the campaign against Russia, based on unsubstantiated claims of Russian government hacking of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and the Hillary Clinton campaign in the presidential election.

Fuente: Obama escalates anti-Russian campaign with new sanctions and threats – World Socialist Web Site


Top-Secret Snowden Document Reveals What the NSA Knew About Previous Russian Hacking

Now, a never-before-published top-secret document provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden suggests the NSA has a way of collecting evidence of Russian hacks, because the agency tracked a similar hack before in the case of a prominent Russian journalist, who was also a U.S. citizen.

Fuente: Top-Secret Snowden Document Reveals What the NSA Knew About Previous Russian Hacking


The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian

While Moscow’s cyberwar capacity is cutting-edge, the flurry of expulsions and misguided sanctions simply rehash the mistakes of the cold war

Fuente: The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian


En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador

La Casa Blanca aprobó severas medidas para castigar a Moscú por sus supuestos intentos de influir en las elecciones presidenciales de noviembre pasado. Donald Trump dijo que el país debe “ocuparse de cosas más grandes y mejores”, aunque anunció que se reunirá la próxima semana con los jefes de inteligencia para informarse sobre el caso.

Fuente: En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador


El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador

Tres académicos renunciaron a organizar un seminario sobre temas de seguridad e inteligencia, porque sospechan que una editorial ligada a la actividad pueda ser usada como pantalla por espías del Kremlin. “Cambridge es un maravilloso lugar de teorías conspirativas pero la idea de que haya un complot maquiavélico es ridículo”, dijo Neil Kent, uno de los principales impulsores del evento.

Fuente: El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador


Obama advierte que EEUU tomará represalias contra Rusia por ataques informáticos durante campaña presidencial – El Mostrador

El presidente comentó además que “algunas (de esas medidas) puede que sean explícitas y públicas, mientras que otras puede que no”.

Fuente: Obama advierte que EEUU tomará represalias contra Rusia por ataques informáticos durante campaña presidencial – El Mostrador


UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat

“The connectivity that is at the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims deniably,” said Mr Younger. “They do this through means as varied as cyber attacks, propaganda or subversion of democratic process.”

Fuente: UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat


If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

What’s the CIA’s brilliant plan for stopping Russian cyber-attacks on the US and their alleged interference with the US election? Apparently, some in the agency want to escalate tensions between the two superpowers even more and possibly do the same thing right back to them.

Fuente: If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Russian court ruling could hit Google – FT.com

A recent court decision could see Google’s market share in online search drop significantly in Russia and have repercussions for a similar antitrust case in the EU, according to Yandex, Google’s main competitor in Russia.

Fuente: Russian court ruling could hit Google – FT.com


Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador

“Las noticias sobre mi muerte han sido enormemente exageradas”, escribió Snowden en su cuenta de Twitter, en la que colgó una foto del escritor estadounidense, Mark Twain, al que pertenece la famosa cita.

Fuente: Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador


Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com

The bill, signed by Vladimir Putin, Russian president, last week requires telecoms companies to store all text and voice messages, as well as all images, sound and video, transmitted via Russia on servers in the country for up to six months. They are also required to store metadata — information about when and from where messages were sent — for three years.

Fuente: Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com


Violence against Russia’s web dissidents raises fresh fears for internet freedoms

Beatings and arson attacks on social media users represents new frontier in intimidation campaign, say analysts. RFE/RL reports

Fuente: Violence against Russia’s web dissidents raises fresh fears for internet freedoms


Russian government hackers steal DNC files on Donald Trump | Technology | The Guardian

Some of the hackers had been lurking in the systems since at least last summer, well before Trump sealed the Republican nomination, but only recently exfiltrated the Democratic party’s cache of files on Trump’s business dealings and past political statements, investigators said.

Fuente: Russian government hackers steal DNC files on Donald Trump | Technology | The Guardian


Twitter unblocks spoof Putin account after widespread criticism | World news | The Guardian

@DarthPutinKGB reinstated following suspension alongside several other accounts satirising Russian officials

Fuente: Twitter unblocks spoof Putin account after widespread criticism | World news | The Guardian


Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity | Technology | The Guardian

FindFace compares photos to profile pictures on social network Vkontakte and works out identities with 70% reliability

Fuente: Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity | Technology | The Guardian


Russia’s chief internet censor enlists China’s know-how — FT.com

For an authoritarian government looking to tighten control of an unruly internet, who better to call than the architect of China’s “great firewall”? That was the thinking of Konstantin Malofeev, a multimillionaire with close links to the Kremlin and Russian Orthodox Church, who has become a key player in Moscow’s drive to tame the web and limit America’s digital influence.

Fuente: Russia’s chief internet censor enlists China’s know-how — FT.com


Russian hackers read unclassified Obama emails – report | US news | The Guardian

Russian hackers read unclassified Obama emails – report | US news | The Guardian.

Obama President Barack Obama is seen through a window of the Oval Office at the White House. Photograph: Jim Lo Scalzo/Corbis

Unclassified emails to and from President Barack Obama were read last year by Russian hackers, the New York Times reported on Saturday.

The White House confirmed the breach earlier this month, saying it took place last year and that it did not affect classified information.

The newspaper, however, said the hack “was far more intrusive and worrisome than has been publicly acknowledged”.

The president’s closely guarded BlackBerry email account was not hacked, the Times said, but communications with other users were swept up.

Quoting “senior American officials briefed on the investigation”, the Times said the hackers penetrated sensitive parts of the White House computer system, as well as the State Department. The hackers are presumed to be linked to the Russian government, if not necessarily working for it.


El “ejército de blogueros” de Vladimir Putin – El Mostrador

El “ejército de blogueros” de Vladimir Putin – El Mostrador.

21 DE MARZO DE 2015

Reciben un pago del gobierno por critica a Ucrania y a países occidentales

Cientos de miles de comentarios a favor del presidente ruso en las redes, 400 empleados, turnos de 12 horas son algunos de los detalles revelados acerca del supuesto “ciberejército” del Ejecutivo.

635622956861019459m

En el último año se ha visto un aumento sin precedentes en las actividades de los llamados “troles del Kremlin” en Rusia.

Se trata, presuntamente, de blogueros que reciben un pago del gobierno por criticar a Ucrania y a países occidentales en las redes sociales y hacer comentarios positivos acerca del liderazgo en Moscú.

Aunque la existencia de un supuesto “ejército cibernético” no es ningún secreto, información publicada recientemente en diferentes medios revela detalles acerca del funcionamiento diario de una de las herramientas propagandísticas utilizadas por el Estado.

La Agencia de Investigación de Internet (Agentstvo Internet Issledovaniya) emplea a 400 personas y se encuentra en una ordinaria oficina en un área residencial de San Petersburgo.

Pero tras su sencilla fachada se encuentra la “guarida de los troles del Kremlin”, según un reportaje investigativo publicado por Moy Rayon (Mi Distrito), un periódico local e independiente.


The "Snowden is Ready to Come Home!" Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept

The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept.

Featured photo - The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit

Most sentient people rationally accept that the U.S. media routinely disseminates misleading stories and outright falsehoods in the most authoritative tones. But it’s nonetheless valuable to examine particularly egregious case studies to see how that works. In that spirit, let’s take yesterday’s numerous, breathless reports trumpeting the “BREAKING” news that “Edward Snowden now wants to come home!” and is “now negotiating the terms of his return!”

Ever since Snowden revealed himself to the public 20 months ago, he has repeatedly said the same exact thing when asked about his returning to the U.S.: I would love to come home, and would do so if I could get a fair trial, but right now, I can’t.

His primary rationale for this argument has long been that under the Espionage Act, the 1917 statute under which he has been charged, he would be barred by U.S. courts from even raising his key defense: that the information he revealed to journalists should never have been concealed in the first place and he was thus justified in disclosing it to journalists. In other words, when U.S. political and media figures say Snowden should “man up,” come home and argue to a court that he did nothing wrong, they are deceiving the public, since they have made certain that whistleblowers charged with “espionage” are legally barred from even raising that defense.


Edward Snowden's lawyers 'working' to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s lawyers ‘working’ to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden in Citizenfour. Edward Snowden in the Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Photograph: PR

 

 

A Russian lawyer for Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower, said on Tuesday that new legal efforts were under way to arrange a return for Snowden to the United States, although such efforts could not be independently confirmed.

 

“I won’t keep it secret that he … wants to return back home,” lawyer Anatoly Kucherena told Reuters. “And we are doing everything possible now to solve this issue. There is a group of US lawyers, there is also a group of German lawyers and I’m dealing with it on the Russian side.”

A US legal adviser to Snowden, Ben Wizner, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, declined on Wednesday to comment on Kucherena’s statement.


“No me gusta el estilo de vida de los ricos” | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

“No me gusta el estilo de vida de los ricos” | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.

El fundador de la mayor red social rusa, VKontakte, y de la mensajería instántanea Telegram, huyó de Rusia el pasado mes de abril

Pável Durov, fundador de la red social Vkontakte, en una conferencia en San Francisco el pasado 2 de diciembre. /JIM WILSON (THE NEW YORK TIMES)

Una nube de admiradores sigue a Pável Durov para hacerse una foto con él. El trato que le dan es parecido al que tendría una estrella emergente del rock. Pero el Mark Zuckerberg ruso no tiene tatuajes, ni piercings. Y viste siempre de negro, “por comodidad y para ir siempre conjuntado”, se justifica.

Este emprendedor y programador nacido en San Petersburgo en 1984 abandonó su país natal el pasado mes de abril y se encuentra ahora en San Francisco, donde se celebra esta entrevista. Se fue tras haber resistido durante meses la creciente presión de los servicios de seguridad del Kremlin para que revelara información sobre grupos de la oposición que se comunican a través de la red social VKontakte, que fundó junto a su hermano Nikolai en 2006. Le pidieron perfiles de personas implicadas en las protestas de Ucrania y no quiso colaborar. Vendió su empresa y dejó el país.

Durov, que puso en pie la mayor red social de su país, con 270 millones de usuarios, es también el creador de la mensajería instantánea Telegram, un servicio similar al de WhatsApp al que muchos usuarios migraron cuando la empresa fundada por Jan Koum y Brian Acton fue adquirida por Facebook.


Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

“Depende directamente de la situación internacional”, asegura el presidente ruso

 

 

El presidente ruso habla sobre mejorar la seguridad en internet / Reuters-Live

Los ciberataques contra recursos informativos de Rusia se han multiplicado en los últimos tiempos y “perfeccionan” sus “métodos, medios y táctica”, según afirmó el miércoles el presidente Vladímir Putin, al iniciar una sesión especial del Consejo de Seguridad dedicada a “cuestiones relacionadas con la defensa del espacio informativo de Rusia de las amenazas modernas”. Los temas en cuestión tienen, según dijo, una “importancia excepcional para la capacidad de defensa del país, el desarrollo sostenible de la economía, la esfera social y la defensa de la soberanía de Rusia en el sentido más amplio”.

En la alocución difundida en la página de web del Kremlin, Putin no dio cifras, pero el secretario del Consejo de Seguridad, Nikolái Pátrushev, citado por la agencia Interfax, dijo que desde 2010 han sido registrados y rechazados más de 90 millones de ciberataques contra recursos rusos, de los cuales 57 millones ocurrieron durante la primera mitad de este año y estuvieron relacionados con temas como la Olimpiada de Sochi y la situación en Ucrania. En 2010, se registraron 3,3 millones de ataques.

La intensidad de los ciberataques “depende directamente de la situación internacional”, afirmó Putin, quien instó a tener en cuenta los “riesgos y amenazas” en el campo de la información. “Países aislados intentan utilizar su posición dominante en el espacio informativo global para lograr no solo sus fines económicos, sino militares y políticos”, subrayó el líder ruso, según el cual “desde principios del año pasado se está formando el sistema estatal para detectar, prevenir y liquidar las secuelas de los ataques cibernéticos a los recursos informativos de Rusia”.


Rusia y Occidente aceleran su ciberguerra | SurySur

Rusia y Occidente aceleran su ciberguerra | SurySur.

 

ciberguerra

Según un comandante de EE.UU., la anexión de Crimea por parte de Rusia y el posterior conflicto que estalló en Ucrania demostraron que Rusia supo integrar en su operativo militar una estrategia ciberofensiva que resultó muy eficaz.

La confrontación en curso entre Rusia y Occidente reactivó una disciplina cuyo imaginario ha sido alimentado por la informática, el cine, la literatura, los rumores y un puñado de hechos constatados: la ciberguerra. El desplazamiento de un conflicto desde un territorio al ciberespacio lleva años generando especulaciones y, en algunos casos, enfrentamientos reales como el ciberataque masivo de que fue objeto Estonia en 2007, el ataque contra los sistemas de misiles aire-tierra de Siria en el mismo año, los operativos en Georgia, el permanente hostigamiento digital que protagonizan China y Estados Unidos, o la operación (2010) contra el programa nuclear iraní urdida por Estados Unidos e Israel mediante el virus Stuxnet. Este dispositivo es el descendiente del programa Olympic Games desarrollado por la NSA norteamericana y la unidad 8200 de Israel. La crisis que se desató con Rusia aceleró el recurso a la ciberguerra. Durante la última cumbre –4 y 5 de septiembre– celebrada en plena crisis con Moscú, la OTAN actualizó sus estándares de defensa de Europa por medio de un programa llamado política de ciberdefensa reforzada. Según el comandante norteamericano de las fuerzas aliadas en Europa, la anexión de Crimea por parte de Rusia y el posterior conflicto que estalló en Ucrania demostraron que Rusia supo integrar en su operativo militar una estrategia ciberofensiva que resultó muy eficaz. Moscú habría conseguido interrumpir todas las comunicaciones electrónicas entre las tropas ucranianas estacionadas en la península y los centros de comando repetidos en el resto de Ucrania. Este es el argumento de Occidente para desarrollar en el ciberespacio un frente de conflicto.

El documento elaborado por la OTAN sobre la ciberguerra es de hecho una postura amenazante. La Alianza Atlántica extendió al ciberespacio todas las garantías del Tratado. Ello quiere decir que cualquier ataque contra las redes informáticas de un país miembro será considerado como un ataque contra todos, o sea, equivalente a una agresión clásica. Occidente crea con este texto un ciberespacio “indivisible”. La consecuencia es evidente: si un Estado exterior a la Alianza Atlántica aparece como responsable de un ciberataque será objeto de represalias que pueden incluir incluso los medios clásicos. Con su recurrente cinismo hambriento de confrontaciones, la Alianza Atlántica hace el papel de futura víctima como si la OTAN o sus miembros más poderosos, Estados Unidos por ejemplo, nunca hubiesen lanzado ciberataques contra alguno de sus adversarios, o espiado la intimidad de cada ser humano del planeta mediante el dispositivo Prism montado por la Agencia Nacional de Seguridad, la NSA, con la servil colaboración de empresas privadas –Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft, etc.–. Sorin Ducaru, adjunto al secretario general de la OTAN y encargado de los “desafíos emergentes” aclaró que el organismo se limitará a defenderse. Según Ducaru, está “excluido lanzar operaciones ciberofensivas. Estás son del dominio de cada país miembro”.


Fin del WiFi anónimo: La iniciativa que provoca indignación en Rusia – BioBioChile

Fin del WiFi anónimo: La iniciativa que provoca indignación en Rusia – BioBioChile.

 

Manuel Iglesias (CC) FlickrManuel Iglesias (CC) Flickr

Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

El gobierno ruso publicó este viernes un decreto que exige a los rusos proporcionar su número de pasaporte o su identidad cuando se conectan a una red wifi pública, lo que provocó la indignación de los internautas.

Este decreto enmienda en realidad una ley ya existente, que prevé que “el operador permita el acceso a los servicios de comunicación y de intercambio de datos, y a una conexión Internet (…) únicamente tras la identificación del usuario”.

El servidor de acceso a internet deberá recopilar así teóricamente el nombre completo y las informaciones contenidas en el pasaporte del usuario, y almacenar estas informaciones durante seis meses, así como anotar y conservar la duración de la conexión del usuario, según el decreto.

Esta medida provocó la indignación de los internautas. “Un verdadero ‘Gran Hermano’ está naciendo ante nuestros ojos (…) un sistema que conoce quién ha escrito qué, cuándo y dónde”, dijo en su blog Alexei Navalny, el opositor número uno del Kremlin.

Los responsables rusos se esforzaron en justificar este dispositivo. El ayuntamiento de Moscú dijo que esta medida sólo afectaba a la zonas de conexión internet en las oficinas de correos.

Por su parte, el ministerio ruso de Comunicación declaró que esta decisión se inscribía en el marco de la lucha contra el terrorismo y que no afectaba a las redes wifi privadas.


Rusia concede a Snowden un permiso de residencia de tres años | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Rusia concede a Snowden un permiso de residencia de tres años | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

Declaraciones del abogado de Snowden / Foto: Efe | Vídeo: Reuters

Enviar a LinkedIn2
Enviar a TuentiEnviar a MenéameEnviar a Eskup

EnviarImprimirGuardar

Edward Snowden, el exanalista de la de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional que reveló los secretos del espionaje electrónico masivo de Estados Unidos, puede respirar relativamente tranquilo por tres años más: Rusia le ha entregado un permiso de residencia por ese plazo, anunció el jueves su abogado Anatoli Kucherena.

El plazo cuenta a partir del primero de agosto, señaló Kucherena en una conferencia de prensa que transcurrió en ausencia del informático, que llegó a Moscú el 23 de junio del año pasado procedente de Hong Kong. En principio, Snowden tenía planes de seguir vuelo hacia América del Sur, pero la reacción de Estados Unidos, que anuló su pasaporte y que podía interceptar el avión –como lo haría posteriormente con la aeronave del presidente boliviano Evo Moralescuando creyó que este se había llevado de Moscú al fugitivo-, determinaron que cambiara de planes y decidiera permanecer en Rusia.

Aunque Kucherena dijo que el nuevo régimen concedido le permitirá salir al extranjero, para hacerlo Snowden tendría que tener algún otro tipo de documento de viaje en regla que no sea el pasaporte estadounidense, ya que este fue anulado. El permiso de residencia no es un documento de viaje ni le otorga el estatus de refugiado político, aunque sí le da casi todos los derechos de los que goza un ruso.

Razones de seguridad impiden que se haga público dónde trabaja Snowden, aunque si él quisiera dar esa información podría hacerlo, dijo Kucherena. Agregó que el informático, si bien vive en la clandestinidad, hace una vida relativamente normal, estudia ruso y pasea. Los mismos motivos de seguridad explican que no estuviera presente en la conferencia de prensa, pero “en cuanto se presente la más mínima oportunidad” Snowden comparecerá ante los periodistas, aseguró el abogado.


Cybersecurity experts take Russian hacking scare 'with a pinch of salt' | Technology | theguardian.com

Cybersecurity experts take Russian hacking scare ‘with a pinch of salt’ | Technology | theguardian.com.

Researchers have expressed concern over Hold Security’s claim that 1.2bn usernames and passwords were stolen by criminal gang

 

 

password
Security company claims to have found a database containing over 1.2bn unique usernames and passwords. Photograph: Pawel Kopczynski/Reuters/Corbis

 

Security researchers have expressed concern over the claim that more than 4.5bn user credentials including 1.2bn unique usernames and passwords have been amassed by a Russian cybercriminal gang.

Security researchers from Kaspersky, Symantec and University College London have questioned the news reported on Tuesday that private security firm Hold Security had identified a Russian cybercriminal gang called CyberVor, which had amassed a database of more than 4.5bn stolen records, including 1.2bn unique usernames and passwords belonging to 500m email addresses.

Cybersecurity experts are concerned that Hold Security has not yet made the data public or available for confirmation by users. “We’ve had very little concrete information released,” said David Emm, senior researcher with security firm Kaspersky, talking to the Guardian.

“I’m inclined to take it with a pinch of salt for now.”

CyberVor raided over 420,000 websites to collect the stolen user information, Hold Security said, initially offering a commercial “breach notification” service requiring consumers and companies to see if they had been affected – but only if they paid a fee.

The company still offers its commercial security services as part of the report, and later said it would allow consumers to check free of charge whether their usernames or passwords had been stolen.

“Nothing has been released by an established security company – I personally haven’t come across Hold Security before – and we’ve had no information on the companies affected, or whether they’re still vulnerable,” said Emm. “There’s just what seems to me to be a pretty vague claim of the largest security breach to date.

‘Plausible but we need more data’

“There hasn’t been very much data released yet on exactly what these guys found,” explained Dr Brad Karp, a reader in computer systems and networks at the computer science department at University College London who researches internet and systems security.

Hold Security allowed an unnamed independent security expert to verify the database of stolen user details at the request of the New York Times.

“It’s plausible that they have found this many credentials, but whether they actually have or not we would need to see more data,” said Karp. “We’ve been told independent experts have verified it, but we haven’t seen what they’ve verified and we don’t know who they are.”

Candid Wueest, principal threat researcher with security firm Symantec agreed.

“Without having actual fact, it’s hard to say whether it happened like they explained or not,” said Wueest. “It is possible, but at the moment it’s speculation by one source and we haven’t seen any secondary proof, so at the moment we have to unfortunately wait and see how it evolves.”


Una red criminal rusa roba más de 1.200 millones de contraseñas | Sociedad | EL PAÍS

Una red criminal rusa roba más de 1.200 millones de contraseñas | Sociedad | EL PAÍS.

San Francisco 6 AGO 2014 – 09:39 CEST

 

Un hombre observa en una pantalla de ordenador. / MARIO CRUZ (EFE)

El mayor robo de contraseñas de Internet hasta el momento. Una red de bandas rusas dedicadas al ciberdelito se ha hecho con más de 1.200 millones de nombres de usuario con sus correspondientes claves y unos 500 millones de direcciones de correo electrónico. Alex Holden, el fundador de Hold Security, una firma de seguridad informática con sede en Milwaukee y que ha descubierto la brecha de seguridad, ha explicado a EL PAÍS desde la cita anual de seguridad Black Hat, en Las Vegas, que el material sustraído pertenece a 420.000 webs de todo el mundo.

La intrusión afecta tanto a pequeñas firmas como a otras de gran tamaño dedicadas a ofrecer servicios de Internet. Un experto ajeno a Hold Security ha certificado, a petición de The New York Times, la autenticidad de la base datos con todas las claves y datos relevantes robados.

El director de Hold Security es un viejo conocido en el mundo del blindaje informático. Hace un año ya denunció el robo de varios millones de contraseñas de Adobe, compañía creadora de programas de diseño web, como Photoshop.

Con el pago por uso de programas online y las creaciones alojadas en la nube las implicaciones de estos actos delictivos son más relevantes. En el caso de Adobe se pusieron en peligro tanto los números de tarjetas de crédito como la propiedad intelectual de los usuarios.

Pero en el nuevo episodio de sustracción de datos sensibles que se ha dado a conocer este miércoles la alerta va más allá de lo conocido hasta ahora. La mayoría de los afectados desconocen que sus datos están en manos de delincuentes o no han hecho nada para solucionarlo aún.


Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian

Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian.

Bloggers say new law is attempt to crack down on free expression and criticism of Russian government
Putin

Sites to be regulated under the new law were instrumental in organising protests against president Vladimir Putin. Photograph: Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images

A law that comes into effect in Russia on Friday will place tighter controls on the blogosphere, one of the few remaining places where people can freely criticise the government.

The federal mass media watchdog has said the law is meant to “de-anonymise popular websites”. Prominent bloggers argue it is yet another step to crack down on free expression and will be wielded against critics of the regime.

Popularly known as the “law on bloggers,” the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested. It also holds popular bloggers to the same standards as the mass media, forbidding false information and foul language, although it doesn’t guarantee them the same rights. Violators could incur fines of up to 50,000 rubles (£800) and be blacklisted.

Facebook, Twitter, LiveJournal and other social media sites regulated under the new law played an instrumental role in organising the protests against president Vladimir Putin in 2011-13 and have provided a vital platform for critical voices, since most nationwide television and print media is controlled by the government.

Already, the authorities enjoy sweeping powers under a 2013 law to close down websites for advocating “extremist activities” or “participation in public events held in breach of appropriate procedures.” In March, the media watchdog blocked three opposition news portals and the LiveJournal blog of opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny, who specialises in exposés on the luxurious real estate owned by prominent officials, replete with documents and photographs.

Popular blogger and media entrepreneur Anton Nosik called the law on bloggers unconstitutional and said it was meant to intimidate regime critics.


Russia hits out at 'kidnapping' of MP's son by US secret service | World news | The Guardian

Russia hits out at ‘kidnapping’ of MP’s son by US secret service | World news | The Guardian.

Roman Seleznev, son of politician known for anti-American outbursts, arrested in Maldives on suspicion of hacking activities
Valery Seleznev,

The US secret service has arrested Roman Seleznev, son of Valery Seleznev (above), on suspicion of hacking. Photograph: Stanislav Krasilnikov/AFP/Getty Images

Russian authorities have reacted with anger over the “kidnapping” of the son of a Russian MP, apparently detained by US agents in the Maldives, on suspicion of hacking computer systems in order to steal the credit card details of thousands of Americans.

The US department of homeland security announced on Monday that the secret service had arrested Roman Seleznev on suspicion of hacking activities carried out between 2009 and 2011. He is the son of Valery Seleznev, an MP from the ultra-nationalist Liberal Democratic arty, whose leader has frequently made anti-American outbursts.

Russia‘s foreign ministry said that Seleznev was seized by US officials as he attempted to board a plane in the Maldives, and was instead forcefully transferred to another plane, from where he was flown to the US Pacific island of Guam.