Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election

While the document provides a rare window into the NSA’s understanding of the mechanics of Russian hacking, it does not show the underlying “raw” intelligence on which the analysis is based. A U.S. intelligence officer who declined to be identified cautioned against drawing too big a conclusion from the document because a single analysis is not necessarily definitive.

Fuente: Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election


‘Give them a pill’: Putin accuses US of hysteria over election hacking inquiry | World news | The Guardian

Russian president calls allegations of interference in US presidential election ‘useless and harmful chatter’ at St Petersburg economic forum

Fuente: ‘Give them a pill’: Putin accuses US of hysteria over election hacking inquiry | World news | The Guardian


Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian

Norway’s foreign ministry, army and other institutions have been targeted in a cyber-attack by a group suspected of having links to Russian authorities, according to Norwegian intelligence, which was one of the targets.

Fuente: Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian


Russian cybersecurity experts suspected of treason linked to CIA | World news | The Guardian

Two of Moscow’s top cybersecurity officials are facing treason charges for cooperating with the CIA, according to a Russian news report.The accusations add further intrigue to a mysterious scandal that has had the Moscow rumour mill working in overdrive for the past week, and comes not long after US intelligence accused Russia of interfering in the US election and hacking the Democratic party’s servers.

Fuente: Russian cybersecurity experts suspected of treason linked to CIA | World news | The Guardian


Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian

Earlier on Wednesday, Maria Zakharova, a foreign ministry spokeswoman, wrote on Facebook that Snowden’s right to stay had recently been extended “by a couple of years”. Her post came in response to a suggestion from the former acting CIA director Michael Morell that Vladimir Putin might hand over Snowden to the US, despite there being no extradition treaty between the countries.

Fuente: Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia extended for three years | US news | The Guardian


Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian

The intelligence report’s lack of even hints at the kind of evidence collected make it difficult to assess the claims, and its weakness gave Russian officials ample opportunity to poke fun.The foreign ministry spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova, wrote on Facebook on Monday: “If ‘Russian hackers’ managed to hack anything in America, it’s two things: Obama’s brain and, of course, the report itself.”

Fuente: Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian


Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian

Alisa Shevchenko is a talented young Russian hacker, known for working with companies to find vulnerabilities in their systems. She is also, the White House claims, guilty of helping Vladimir Putin interfere in the US election.

Fuente: Young Russian denies she aided election hackers: ‘I never work with douchebags’ | World news | The Guardian


Por qué los servicios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos acusan a Putin de ordenar ciberataques – El Mostrador

La versión desclasificada no contenía ninguna prueba detallada del supuesto papel de Putin. Desde que ganó las elecciones, Trump cuestionó repetidamente a la inteligencia estadounidense por acusar a Rusia de haber hackeado al Partido Demócrata.

Fuente: Por qué los servicios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos acusan a Putin de ordenar ciberataques – El Mostrador


The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.

It’s plausible, and in my opinion likely, that hackers under orders from the Russian government were responsible for the DNC and Podesta hacks in order to influence the U.S. election in favor of Donald Trump. But the Grizzly Steppe report fails to adequately back up this claim. My research, for example, shows that much of the evidence presented is evidence of nothing at all.

Fuente: The U.S. Government Thinks Thousands of Russian Hackers May Be Reading My Blog. They Aren’t.


Russia hacking: US intelligence chief hits back at Trump’s ‘disparagement’ | Technology | The Guardian

Yet neither Clapper nor Rogers offered new evidence for their October conclusion of Russian interference. Clapper promised to release an unclassified report early next week, prepared by the NSA, CIA and FBI, providing additional information for the intelligence agencies’ conclusion that Russia deliberately hacked the Democratic National Committee in order to aid Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

Fuente: Russia hacking: US intelligence chief hits back at Trump’s ‘disparagement’ | Technology | The Guardian


Top-Secret Snowden Document Reveals What the NSA Knew About Previous Russian Hacking

Now, a never-before-published top-secret document provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden suggests the NSA has a way of collecting evidence of Russian hacks, because the agency tracked a similar hack before in the case of a prominent Russian journalist, who was also a U.S. citizen.

Fuente: Top-Secret Snowden Document Reveals What the NSA Knew About Previous Russian Hacking


The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian

While Moscow’s cyberwar capacity is cutting-edge, the flurry of expulsions and misguided sanctions simply rehash the mistakes of the cold war

Fuente: The hacking is 21st-century, but US-Russia relations are stuck in the past | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian


En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador

La Casa Blanca aprobó severas medidas para castigar a Moscú por sus supuestos intentos de influir en las elecciones presidenciales de noviembre pasado. Donald Trump dijo que el país debe “ocuparse de cosas más grandes y mejores”, aunque anunció que se reunirá la próxima semana con los jefes de inteligencia para informarse sobre el caso.

Fuente: En qué consisten las sanciones aprobadas por EE.UU. contra Rusia por los ciberataques ocurridos durante la campaña electoral – El Mostrador


El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador

Tres académicos renunciaron a organizar un seminario sobre temas de seguridad e inteligencia, porque sospechan que una editorial ligada a la actividad pueda ser usada como pantalla por espías del Kremlin. “Cambridge es un maravilloso lugar de teorías conspirativas pero la idea de que haya un complot maquiavélico es ridículo”, dijo Neil Kent, uno de los principales impulsores del evento.

Fuente: El fantasma del espionaje durante la guerra fría se instala en la Universidad de Cambridge – El Mostrador


Obama advierte que EEUU tomará represalias contra Rusia por ataques informáticos durante campaña presidencial – El Mostrador

El presidente comentó además que “algunas (de esas medidas) puede que sean explícitas y públicas, mientras que otras puede que no”.

Fuente: Obama advierte que EEUU tomará represalias contra Rusia por ataques informáticos durante campaña presidencial – El Mostrador


UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat

“The connectivity that is at the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims deniably,” said Mr Younger. “They do this through means as varied as cyber attacks, propaganda or subversion of democratic process.”

Fuente: UK spy chief warns on ‘profound’ propaganda threat


If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

What’s the CIA’s brilliant plan for stopping Russian cyber-attacks on the US and their alleged interference with the US election? Apparently, some in the agency want to escalate tensions between the two superpowers even more and possibly do the same thing right back to them.

Fuente: If the US hacks Russia for revenge, that could lead to cyberwar | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian


Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador

“Las noticias sobre mi muerte han sido enormemente exageradas”, escribió Snowden en su cuenta de Twitter, en la que colgó una foto del escritor estadounidense, Mark Twain, al que pertenece la famosa cita.

Fuente: Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador


Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com

The bill, signed by Vladimir Putin, Russian president, last week requires telecoms companies to store all text and voice messages, as well as all images, sound and video, transmitted via Russia on servers in the country for up to six months. They are also required to store metadata — information about when and from where messages were sent — for three years.

Fuente: Russian telecoms groups mount fight against anti-terror law – FT.com


Russia’s chief internet censor enlists China’s know-how — FT.com

For an authoritarian government looking to tighten control of an unruly internet, who better to call than the architect of China’s “great firewall”? That was the thinking of Konstantin Malofeev, a multimillionaire with close links to the Kremlin and Russian Orthodox Church, who has become a key player in Moscow’s drive to tame the web and limit America’s digital influence.

Fuente: Russia’s chief internet censor enlists China’s know-how — FT.com


Russian hackers read unclassified Obama emails – report | US news | The Guardian

Russian hackers read unclassified Obama emails – report | US news | The Guardian.

Obama President Barack Obama is seen through a window of the Oval Office at the White House. Photograph: Jim Lo Scalzo/Corbis

Unclassified emails to and from President Barack Obama were read last year by Russian hackers, the New York Times reported on Saturday.

The White House confirmed the breach earlier this month, saying it took place last year and that it did not affect classified information.

The newspaper, however, said the hack “was far more intrusive and worrisome than has been publicly acknowledged”.

The president’s closely guarded BlackBerry email account was not hacked, the Times said, but communications with other users were swept up.

Quoting “senior American officials briefed on the investigation”, the Times said the hackers penetrated sensitive parts of the White House computer system, as well as the State Department. The hackers are presumed to be linked to the Russian government, if not necessarily working for it.


The "Snowden is Ready to Come Home!" Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept

The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit – The Intercept.

Featured photo - The “Snowden is Ready to Come Home!” Story: a Case Study in Typical Media Deceit

Most sentient people rationally accept that the U.S. media routinely disseminates misleading stories and outright falsehoods in the most authoritative tones. But it’s nonetheless valuable to examine particularly egregious case studies to see how that works. In that spirit, let’s take yesterday’s numerous, breathless reports trumpeting the “BREAKING” news that “Edward Snowden now wants to come home!” and is “now negotiating the terms of his return!”

Ever since Snowden revealed himself to the public 20 months ago, he has repeatedly said the same exact thing when asked about his returning to the U.S.: I would love to come home, and would do so if I could get a fair trial, but right now, I can’t.

His primary rationale for this argument has long been that under the Espionage Act, the 1917 statute under which he has been charged, he would be barred by U.S. courts from even raising his key defense: that the information he revealed to journalists should never have been concealed in the first place and he was thus justified in disclosing it to journalists. In other words, when U.S. political and media figures say Snowden should “man up,” come home and argue to a court that he did nothing wrong, they are deceiving the public, since they have made certain that whistleblowers charged with “espionage” are legally barred from even raising that defense.


Edward Snowden's lawyers 'working' to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden’s lawyers ‘working’ to bring NSA whistleblower back to US | US news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden in Citizenfour. Edward Snowden in the Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Photograph: PR

 

 

A Russian lawyer for Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower, said on Tuesday that new legal efforts were under way to arrange a return for Snowden to the United States, although such efforts could not be independently confirmed.

 

“I won’t keep it secret that he … wants to return back home,” lawyer Anatoly Kucherena told Reuters. “And we are doing everything possible now to solve this issue. There is a group of US lawyers, there is also a group of German lawyers and I’m dealing with it on the Russian side.”

A US legal adviser to Snowden, Ben Wizner, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, declined on Wednesday to comment on Kucherena’s statement.


Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Putin asegura que no aspira al “control total” de Internet en Rusia | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

 

“Depende directamente de la situación internacional”, asegura el presidente ruso

 

 

El presidente ruso habla sobre mejorar la seguridad en internet / Reuters-Live

Los ciberataques contra recursos informativos de Rusia se han multiplicado en los últimos tiempos y “perfeccionan” sus “métodos, medios y táctica”, según afirmó el miércoles el presidente Vladímir Putin, al iniciar una sesión especial del Consejo de Seguridad dedicada a “cuestiones relacionadas con la defensa del espacio informativo de Rusia de las amenazas modernas”. Los temas en cuestión tienen, según dijo, una “importancia excepcional para la capacidad de defensa del país, el desarrollo sostenible de la economía, la esfera social y la defensa de la soberanía de Rusia en el sentido más amplio”.

En la alocución difundida en la página de web del Kremlin, Putin no dio cifras, pero el secretario del Consejo de Seguridad, Nikolái Pátrushev, citado por la agencia Interfax, dijo que desde 2010 han sido registrados y rechazados más de 90 millones de ciberataques contra recursos rusos, de los cuales 57 millones ocurrieron durante la primera mitad de este año y estuvieron relacionados con temas como la Olimpiada de Sochi y la situación en Ucrania. En 2010, se registraron 3,3 millones de ataques.

La intensidad de los ciberataques “depende directamente de la situación internacional”, afirmó Putin, quien instó a tener en cuenta los “riesgos y amenazas” en el campo de la información. “Países aislados intentan utilizar su posición dominante en el espacio informativo global para lograr no solo sus fines económicos, sino militares y políticos”, subrayó el líder ruso, según el cual “desde principios del año pasado se está formando el sistema estatal para detectar, prevenir y liquidar las secuelas de los ataques cibernéticos a los recursos informativos de Rusia”.


Fin del WiFi anónimo: La iniciativa que provoca indignación en Rusia – BioBioChile

Fin del WiFi anónimo: La iniciativa que provoca indignación en Rusia – BioBioChile.

 

Manuel Iglesias (CC) FlickrManuel Iglesias (CC) Flickr

Publicado por Denisse Charpentier | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

El gobierno ruso publicó este viernes un decreto que exige a los rusos proporcionar su número de pasaporte o su identidad cuando se conectan a una red wifi pública, lo que provocó la indignación de los internautas.

Este decreto enmienda en realidad una ley ya existente, que prevé que “el operador permita el acceso a los servicios de comunicación y de intercambio de datos, y a una conexión Internet (…) únicamente tras la identificación del usuario”.

El servidor de acceso a internet deberá recopilar así teóricamente el nombre completo y las informaciones contenidas en el pasaporte del usuario, y almacenar estas informaciones durante seis meses, así como anotar y conservar la duración de la conexión del usuario, según el decreto.

Esta medida provocó la indignación de los internautas. “Un verdadero ‘Gran Hermano’ está naciendo ante nuestros ojos (…) un sistema que conoce quién ha escrito qué, cuándo y dónde”, dijo en su blog Alexei Navalny, el opositor número uno del Kremlin.

Los responsables rusos se esforzaron en justificar este dispositivo. El ayuntamiento de Moscú dijo que esta medida sólo afectaba a la zonas de conexión internet en las oficinas de correos.

Por su parte, el ministerio ruso de Comunicación declaró que esta decisión se inscribía en el marco de la lucha contra el terrorismo y que no afectaba a las redes wifi privadas.


Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian

Russia tightens controls on blogosphere | World news | The Guardian.

Bloggers say new law is attempt to crack down on free expression and criticism of Russian government
Putin

Sites to be regulated under the new law were instrumental in organising protests against president Vladimir Putin. Photograph: Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images

A law that comes into effect in Russia on Friday will place tighter controls on the blogosphere, one of the few remaining places where people can freely criticise the government.

The federal mass media watchdog has said the law is meant to “de-anonymise popular websites”. Prominent bloggers argue it is yet another step to crack down on free expression and will be wielded against critics of the regime.

Popularly known as the “law on bloggers,” the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested. It also holds popular bloggers to the same standards as the mass media, forbidding false information and foul language, although it doesn’t guarantee them the same rights. Violators could incur fines of up to 50,000 rubles (£800) and be blacklisted.

Facebook, Twitter, LiveJournal and other social media sites regulated under the new law played an instrumental role in organising the protests against president Vladimir Putin in 2011-13 and have provided a vital platform for critical voices, since most nationwide television and print media is controlled by the government.

Already, the authorities enjoy sweeping powers under a 2013 law to close down websites for advocating “extremist activities” or “participation in public events held in breach of appropriate procedures.” In March, the media watchdog blocked three opposition news portals and the LiveJournal blog of opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny, who specialises in exposés on the luxurious real estate owned by prominent officials, replete with documents and photographs.

Popular blogger and media entrepreneur Anton Nosik called the law on bloggers unconstitutional and said it was meant to intimidate regime critics.


Cae una red de fraude cibernético infiltrada en ordenadores de 12 países | Internacional | EL PAÍS

Cae una red de fraude cibernético infiltrada en ordenadores de 12 países | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


El departamento de Justicia de EE UU anunció este lunes la operación. / REUTERS

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Una investigación internacional liderada por el FBI ha permitido desmantelar una red de fraude cibernético en 12 países que había robado más de 100 millones de dólares. Las autoridades estadounidenses anunciaron este lunes que se trata del “más sofisticado¨ sistema de infiltración remota de piratas informáticos que el FBI ha desarticulado e identificaron a un ciudadano ruso como el líder de la trama.

Tras esta operación, Evgeniy Bogachev, de 30 años, fue incorporado a la lista del FBI de cibercriminales más buscados. Dado que Rusia no extradita a otros países a sus ciudadanos acusados, es posible que Bogachev nunca llegue a ser detenido. Y con la tensión actual entre Washington y Moscú, a raíz de la crisis ucrania, parece muy improbable cualquier gesto conciliador de Rusia. Consciente de estas limitaciones, el anuncio de su identidad responde a la nueva estrategia de Washington de revelar abiertamente a sus piratas informáticos más buscados, como ya hizo hace dos semanas al acusar a cinco militares chinos de ciberespionaje industrial.

La red conocida como Gameover Zeus logró infectar a entre medio millón y un millón de ordenadores en distintas partes del mundo mediante dos programas con los que robaban credenciales bancarias para posteriormente “vaciar las cuentas” de sus usuarios, y después chantajear a sus propietarios para que pagaran una fianza a cambio de devolverles los datos sustraídos.

El sistema era de tal sofisticación que permitía a los hackers “infiltrarse, espiar e incluso controlar” los ordenadores infectados “desde cualquier lugar”, según la investigación del FBI. “Implementaron el tipo de cibercrímenes que no te creerías si los vieras en una película de ciencia ficción”, dijo el vicefiscal general, Leslie Caldwell, en una rueda de prensa en la sede del departamento de Justicia en Washington.


How Big Is Weibo's Censorship Discount? – Bloomberg View

How Big Is Weibo’s Censorship Discount? – Bloomberg View.

3

The less-than-stellar initial public offering of “China’s Twitter,” Weibo Corp., provides a unique opportunity to quantify the elusive effect of freedom, or lack thereof, on the value of social networks.

Most attempts to explain why Weibo had to settle for the lower end of its IPO price range, $17, valuing itself at a mere $3.46 billion compared with Twitter’s $25.2 billion, mention the Chinese microblog platform’s censorship discount. “The caged bird may not sing,” as Seth Feigerman put it on Mashable.

Weibo’s IPO prospectus says this in the risks section: “Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China may adversely affect our business and subject us to liability for information displayed on our platform.” Weibo goes on to say it “cannot effectively control or restrict” content published by users despite the fact that censors — reportedly, 150 of them, aided by a system of software filters — work around the clock to remove forbidden material. In fact, censorship may be having an adverse effect on Weibo’s user base growth. In January, London’s Telegraph newspaper published the results of a study it commissioned, showing that Weibo usage dropped sharply after a 2013 campaign by the Chinese government to intimidate influential users. One of them, venture capitalist Charles Xue, was arrested and accused of soliciting prostitutes. Others got the message and either stopped using the platform or cut down on posting.


Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama | Edward Snowden | Comment is free | theguardian.com

Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama | Edward Snowden | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

I questioned the Russian president live on TV to get his answer on the record, not to whitewash him

Vladimir Putin during the nationwide phone-in in Moscow.
Vladimir Putin during the nationwide phone-in in Moscow. Photograph: RIA Novosti/Reuters

On Thursday, I questioned Russia’s involvement in mass surveillance on live television. I asked Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, a question that cannot credibly be answered in the negative by any leader who runs a modern, intrusive surveillance program: “Does [your country] intercept, analyse or store millions of individuals’ communications?”

I went on to challenge whether, even if such a mass surveillance program were effective and technically legal, it could ever be morally justified.

The question was intended to mirror the now infamous exchange in US Senate intelligence committee hearings between senator Ron Wyden and the director of national intelligence, James Clapper, about whether the NSA collected records on millions of Americans, and to invite either an important concession or a clear evasion. (See a side-by-side comparison of Wyden’s question and mine here.)

Clapper’s lie – to the Senate and to the public – was a major motivating force behind my decision to go public, and a historic example of the importance of official accountability.

In his response, Putin denied the first part of the question and dodged on the latter. There are serious inconsistencies in his denial – and we’ll get to them soon – but it was not the president’s suspiciously narrow answer that was criticised by many pundits. It was that I had chosen to ask a question at all.

I was surprised that people who witnessed me risk my life to expose the surveillance practices of my own country could not believe that I might also criticise the surveillance policies of Russia, a country to which I have sworn no allegiance, without ulterior motive. I regret that my question could be misinterpreted, and that it enabled many to ignore the substance of the question – and Putin’s evasive response – in order to speculate, wildly and incorrectly, about my motives for asking it.


Snowden asks Putin about Russian surveillance during phone-in – video | World news | theguardian.com

Snowden asks Putin about Russian surveillance during phone-in – video | World news | theguardian.com.

Edward Snowden calls in to ask a question of the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, during a televised phone-in. Putin denies Russia is involved in ‘mass, indiscriminate’ surveillance but says they use modern means to fight terrorism. Whistleblower Edward Snowden was granted asylum in Russia in 2013


House intelligence chair says Edward Snowden backs Russian expansionism | World news | theguardian.com

House intelligence chair says Edward Snowden backs Russian expansionism | World news | theguardian.com.

• Mike Rogers stands by claim that Snowden had Russian help
• Chinese telecoms giant Huawei condemns ‘NSA infiltration’

huawei
A rack server is seen at the Huawei stand at the 2014 CeBIT technology trade fair in Hanover, Germany. Photograph: Nigel Treblin/Getty Images

The chairman of the House of Representatives intelligence committee, Mike Rogers, on Sunday stood by his claim that the former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, who last year provided thousands of secret documents to media outlets including the Guardian,had been helped by Russia.

On Saturday, in the latest disclosure from such documents, the New York Times and the German magazine Der Spiegel reported that the NSA had obtained sensitive data form the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei.

Asked on NBC’s Meet the Press if he had been irresponsible in making such a charge without evidence, Rogers said: “First of all, I see all the evidence and intelligence, from everything in the activities leading up to this event to very suspicious activity during the event. When you talk to the folks leading the investigation they cannot rule it out.

“No counter-terrorism official in the United States does not believe that Mr Snowden … is not under the influence of Russian intelligence services. We believe he is, I certainly believe he is today.

“For the investigators, they need to figure out when did that influence start. Was he interested in co-operating earlier than what the timeline would suggest?”

Rogers also sought to link Snowden’s actions to Russia’s occupation of Crimea and concerns over the massing of Russian troops on Ukraine’s eastern border.

He said: “He [Snowden] is under the influence of Russian intelligence officials today [and] he is actually supporting, in an odd way, the brazen brutality and expansionism of Russia. He needs to understand that and I think Americans need to understand that in its proper context.”

Elsewhere on Sunday, Huawei defended its independence and said it would condemn any infiltration of its servers, if reports of such activities by the NSA were true.

“If the actions in the report are true, Huawei condemns such activities that invaded and infiltrated into our internal corporate network and monitored our communications,” Huawei’s global cyber security officer, John Suffolk, told Reuters.

Defending Huawei’s independence and security record and saying it was very successful in 145 countries, Suffolk added: “Corporate networks are under constant probe and attack from different sources – such is the status quo in today’s digital age.”

In October 2012, Rogers presided over the release of a Houseintelligence committee report which said US firms should avoid doing business with Huawei and another Chinese telecoms company, ZTE, because they posed a national security threat.

At the time, he said in comments broadcast by CBS: “Find another vendor [than Huawei] if you care about your intellectual property; if you care about your consumers’ privacy and you care about the national security of the United States of America.”

The New York Times said one goal of the NSA operation against Huawei, code-named “Shotgiant”, was to uncover any connections between the company and the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. But it also sought to exploit Huawei’s technology and conduct surveillance through computer and telephone networks Huawei sold to other countries.

If ordered by the US president, the NSA also planned to unleash offensive cyber operations, the newspaper said.

The paper said the NSA gained access to servers in Huawei’s sealed headquarters in Shenzhen and got information about the workings of the giant routers and complex digital switches the company says connect a third of the world’s people.


EE UU acusa a Rusia de filtrar una conversación entre dos diplomáticos | Internacional | EL PAÍS

EE UU acusa a Rusia de filtrar una conversación entre dos diplomáticos | Internacional | EL PAÍS.

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Una conversación telefónica sobre Ucrania entre diplomáticos estadounidenses filtrada y publicada en YouTube este jueves ha elevado aún más la tensión en la crisis sobre el futuro del país. En la grabación, Victoria Nuland, secretaria de Estado adjunta para asuntos europeos de EEUU y Geoffrey Pyatt, embajador estadounidense en Kiev, mantienen un esclarecedora conversación en la que se debate la capacidad de algunos líderes de la oposición para participar en un futuro gobierno ucranio; se discute de cómo facilitar que la protesta contra el actual Gobierno cuaje; y se hace una referencia displicente a la Unión Europea.

La Casa Blanca responsabilizó al gobierno ruso de estar detrás de la filtración. Victoria Nuland, secretaria de Estado adjunta para asuntos europeos, se ha disculpado por sus declaraciones, según informó el Departamento de Estado. El Gobierno ruso sostuvo que la conversación demuestra que Washington maniobra para que tome cuerpo un golpe contra el gobierno ucraniano.

La grabación, publicada en YouTube, contiene un diálogo de poco más de cuatro minutos entre Nuland y Pyatt.


Diputados brasileños negocian viaje para reunirse con Snowden y verificar espionaje de EEUU a Brasil – BioBioChile

Diputados brasileños negocian viaje para reunirse con Snowden y verificar espionaje de EEUU a Brasil – BioBioChile.

Publicado por Alejandra Tillería | La Información es de Agencia AFPM.J.Ambriola en Flickr (cc)

M.J.Ambriola en Flickr (cc)

Legisladores brasileños negocian un viaje a Rusia para reunirse con el exconsultor de inteligencia estadounidense Edward Snowden, a quien se atribuye la divulgación de documentos que comprobarían que Estados Unidos espió a Brasil, según la comisión de Relaciones Exteriores y Defensa.

Los miembros de esa comisión se reunirán el martes con el embajador de Rusia en Brasil, Sergey Pogóssovith Akopov, para acordar las condiciones en que una misión parlamentaria brasileña pueda reunirse con Snowden, asilado en Moscú y requerido por la justicia de Estados Unidos, informó la comisión en un comunicado.

“Nuestra obligación es saber las reales dimensiones de esos programas” de espionaje de Estados Unidos, dijo el presidente de la comisión, Nelson Pellegrino.


Justicia rusa limita acceso a vídeos de Pussy Riot por “extremistas”

http://www.biobiochile.cl/2012/11/29/justicia-rusa-limita-acceso-a-videos-de-pussy-riot-por-extremistas.shtml

Alberto Gonzalez| La Información es deAgencia AFP

Jueves 29 noviembre 2012 | 10:17

La justicia rusa limitó este jueves el acceso en internet a los vídeos del grupo musical Pussy Riot, al considerar que son “extremistas”, según las agencias rusas.

El tribunal Zamoskvoretski de Moscú considera que los vídeos del grupo, en particular la “oración punk” contra el presidente Vladimir Putin son “extremistas” y ha ordenado “restringir el acceso” a estos documentos.