Para acabar con trolls, web noruega obliga a leer antes de comentar

Desde mediados de febrero, NRKbeta, filial de la radiotelevisión pública NRK especializada en medios y tecnologías, impone de forma experimental responder a tres preguntas inspiradas en el texto antes de poder comentar ciertos artículos.

Fuente: Para acabar con trolls, web noruega obliga a leer antes de comentar


Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian

Norway’s foreign ministry, army and other institutions have been targeted in a cyber-attack by a group suspected of having links to Russian authorities, according to Norwegian intelligence, which was one of the targets.

Fuente: Norway accuses group linked to Russia of carrying out cyber-attack | World news | The Guardian


¿Tiene Noruega la fórmula para solucionar el grave problema global de la evasión de impuestos? – El Mostrador

En Oslo, o cualquier ciudad noruega, si tenías alguna duda sobre tus finanzas o las de cualquier compatriota antes de la era digital, sólo tenías que ir al ayuntamiento o municipalidad y buscar los detalles. Hoy en día, quien quiera saber cuánto ganan sus colegas, el jefe o la vecina puede encontrar la respuesta en internet.

Fuente: ¿Tiene Noruega la fórmula para solucionar el grave problema global de la evasión de impuestos? – El Mostrador


Edward Snowden wins Guardian readers' Nobel peace prize poll, ahead of Malala Yousafzai | World news | The Guardian

Edward Snowden wins Guardian readers’ Nobel peace prize poll, ahead of Malala Yousafzai | World news | The Guardian.

Edward Snowden won the majority of Guardian readers’ votes in our online poll, with Malala Yousafzai, joint official winner, in second place

Edward Snowden speaks during a presentation ceremony for the Sam Adams Award in Moscow, Russia.
Edward Snowden. Photograph: Uncredited/AP

Edward Snowden should have won the 2014 Nobel peace prize, according to Guardian readers who put the NSA whistleblower ahead of official winners Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi.

Snowden, who leaked documents revealing global surveillance by the US and UK to the Guardian and others last year, received 47% of reader votes, with educational campaigner Malala gaining 36% and Snowden’s fellow American whistleblower Chelsea Manning at 15%.

Snowden.
He lost the right to live in the country he loves (his words), to be close to his family, his girlfriend, he lost his anonymity and a nice salary in one of the rare companies that could challenge him technically (given his talent there’s not a lot of places where he can grow) and that’s because he’s been lucky not to be in the situation of Chelsea Manning (a fate he had accepted for himself) where he would have lost a lot more.
And he did it just to raise awareness about automatized criminal activities by our own governments and give a chance to the public to decide for itself what to do about it.
He controlled every steps from the moment he started collecting data to the moment the first articles appeared, unlike Chelsea who just sent everything to wikileaks and hoped for the best (that’s why he has my vote more than Chelsea, that and the fact that the data he unveiled are a lot more explosives and forced the whole world to react to it)

Guardian reader Norbert Schuff explained the reasoning behind his vote:

Snowden is the only one on this list who deserves the peace price. His revelations of the broad government surveillance of digital communications not only had the most global impact but will also shape actions for freedom of expression and right of privacy for years to come.

Readers’ hopes were dashed when the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the prestigious and often controversial prize to Malala and Satyarthi for “their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education”.

The committee prides itself on its independence, but, headed by Norway’s former prime minister Thorbjørn Jagland and chosen by Norway’s parliament, its members are keenly aware of the political ramifications of their decisions.

“Giving it to Snowden would run against all political instincts. He is, after all, considered a traitor to one of Norway’s closest allies,” Kristian Harpviken, director at the Peace Research Institute in Oslo, told the Christian Science Monitor.