“La palabra ‘pirata’ pareciera haberse convertido en una especie de fetiche” – El Mostrador

La reproducción y distribución ilegal de copias de obras protegidas por el derecho de autor generan -sólo en Chile- pérdidas superiores a los US$4 mil millones. Cómo frenar la circulación de material apócrifo y desincentivar el consumo de productos culturales falsos, es el desafío que se han impuesto la PDI y Editorial Santillana.

Fuente: “La palabra ‘pirata’ pareciera haberse convertido en una especie de fetiche” – El Mostrador


Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders

A number of recent cases in the media have revealed instances of U.S. citizens and others being compelled by CBP agents to unlock their devices for search. In some instances, people have claimed to have been physically coerced into complying, including one American citizen who said that CBP agents grabbed him by the neck in order to take his cellphone out of his possession.

Fuente: Lawsuit Seeks Transparency as Searches of Cellphones and Laptops Skyrocket at Borders


Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers

For example, the bureau’s agents can decide that a campus organization is not “legitimate” and therefore not entitled to robust protections for free speech; dig for derogatory information on potential informants without any basis for believing they are implicated in unlawful activity; use a person’s immigration status to pressure them to collaborate and then help deport them when they are no longer useful; conduct invasive “assessments” without any reason for suspecting the targets of wrongdoing; demand that companies provide the bureau with personal data about their users in broadly worded national security letters without actual legal authority to do so; fan out across the internet along with a vast army of informants, infiltrating countless online chat rooms; peer through the walls of private homes; and more. The FBI offered various justifications of these tactics to our reporters. But the documents and our reporting on them ultimately reveal a bureaucracy in dire need of greater transparency and accountability.

Fuente: Secret Docs Reveal: President Trump Has Inherited an FBI With Vast Hidden Powers


Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.

He’ll control an unaccountable drone program, and the prison at Guantanamo Bay. His FBI, including a network of 15,000 paid informants, already has a record of spying on mosques and activists, and his NSA’s surveillance empire is ubiquitous and governed by arcane rules, most of which remain secret. He will inherit bombing campaigns in seven Muslim countries, the de facto ability to declare war unilaterally, and a massive nuclear arsenal — much of which is on hair-trigger alert.

Fuente: Commander-In-Chief Donald Trump Will Have Terrifying Powers. Thanks, Obama.


Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian

Privacy activists, human rights campaigners and former US security officials have expressed fears over the prospect of Donald Trump gaining access to the vast global US and UK surveillance network.

Fuente: Privacy experts fear Donald Trump accessing global surveillance network | World news | The Guardian


Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian

A party that favours direct democracy, complete government transparency, decriminalising drugs and offering asylum to Edward Snowden could form the next government in Iceland after the country goes to the polls on Saturday.

Fuente: Iceland election could propel radical Pirate party into power | World news | The Guardian


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian

New concerns have been raised about the political influence of Google after research found at least 80 “revolving door” moves in the past decade – instances where the online giant took on government employees and European governments employed Google staff.

Fuente: Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian


Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian

Over 81,000 reports have been made to I Paid a Bribe, a special website for whistleblowers in India. Not in My Country guides students in Uganda and Kenya through the complaint process for reporting lecturers for corruption, and €5m of corruption involving Greek civil servants has been uncovered through the website EdosaFakelaki.

Fuente: Live Q&A: What role can technology play in fighting corruption? | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian


Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian

The last time the mayor of Cupertino walked into Apple – the largest company in his small Californian town and, it so happens, the most valuable company in the world – he hoped to have a meeting to talk about traffic congestion.Barry Chang barely made it into the lobby when Apple’s security team surrounded and escorted him off the property.

Fuente: Cupertino’s mayor: Apple ‘abuses us’ by not paying taxes | Technology | The Guardian


Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador

“Si se dice que la privacidad me da igual porque no tengo nada que ocultar, entonces sería como decir que te da igual la libertad de expresión porque no tienes nada que decir”, explicó el ex analista de inteligencia estadounidense.

Fuente: Snowden insiste en defender la protección de la privacidad en la red – El Mostrador


Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador

El empresario preguntó a sus asesores y fue advertido de los riesgos que traería publicar un video de YouTube en el cual daba explicaciones: los memes y una visibilidad que nunca había tenido el representante de la fortuna más grande de Chile. Pero la decisión ya estaba tomada. incluida la que permitió a Yerko Puchento subirlo al columpio en su propio canal. “Lo que quise hacer fue algo nuevo, distinto y absolutamente abierto, para que todo el mundo tenga la posibilidad, corriendo el riesgo de ser atacado, mofado, todo lo que ustedes han visto. El tiempo dirá si fue una buena o mala decisión”, dijo Luksic.

Fuente: Luz, cámara, Andrónico: La semana más mediática de Luksic – El Mostrador


¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales

La agenda corta antidelincuencia en tramitación incorpora una norma que permitirá ampliar el secreto de las investigaciones judiciales, sancionando a cualquiera que lo viole con la privación de libertad hasta por 540 días. Nuevamente nos encontramos frente a una norma inserta en un proyecto que ignora la evolución e impacto propios del periodismo de investigación que actualmente tiene lugar en la red.

Fuente: ¿Vuelve el secreto de sumario a Chile? – Derechos Digitales


Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador

La Fronda pretende encerrar el debate en los marcos legales, arrinconar al SII y deslegitimar a la Fiscalía, todo eso para escapar de lo que parece una tormenta perfecta. La norma que se propone no pretende, solamente, reducir el espacio de acción de la prensa, sino también pretende privar a la opinión pública de información fundamental para decidir por quién votar y por quién no votar. Esto explica por qué la Fronda se siente tan amenazada por la nueva lógica de los medios digitales y las redes: ya no puede controlar los contenidos, ya no puede censurar en las cortes. La Fronda busca protegerse de forma impúdica, aterrada ante la disolución del principio de autoridad que había guiado la transición.

Fuente: Fronda y censura: la mordaza de la Transición – El Mostrador


The political storm over the Googleplex – FT.com

The political storm over the Googleplex – FT.com.

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Concern about government snooping is mixed with anxiety about commercial use of data
Ingram Pinn illustration©Ingram Pinn

Google regularly tops the list of companies that students want to work for and, visiting its Silicon Valley campus last week, I could see why. The skies were blue, the temperature was perfect. A group of employees was playing volleyball, while out in the car-park somebody was demonstrating a prototype of a self-driving Google car.

Amid all the fun, Google has emerged as one of the five largest companies in the world, measured by market capitalisation. The largest, Apple, is about 20 minutes drive down the road. Facebook, another giant, is in a nearby suburb.

Yet the Silicon Valley idyll is increasingly being disturbed by political storms blowing in from foreign lands. The world’s students may aspire to work for Google. But the world’s politicians seem to want to bring the company to heel.

This month saw the announcement that the European Commission in Brussels is charging Google with violations of competition law. Potentially, the charges threaten the company with a choice between massive fines or costly modifications to its business model.

Europe is not the only source of trouble. Most western multinationals see the Chinese market as crucial to their futures. But Google, along with Facebook and Twitter, is effectively shut out by the country’s “Great Firewall” that blocks internet access.

Meanwhile, Silicon Valley’s close relations with the Obama administration have got a lot tenser since Edward Snowden’s revelations about the extent of US government snooping on the internet.

The Snowden affair seems to have galvanised those who believe there is something sinister about the power of Silicon Valley. French critics came up with the acronym, “Gafa” (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon), to encapsulate America’s evil internet empire. As the acronym suggests, it is often Google that is placed first in the firing line. Company executives were aghast when the British government decided to crack down on alleged tax avoidance by multinationals and the new measures were dubbed the “Google tax”.

One theory is that Google has attracted particular attention simply because it is the most ubiquitous name in Silicon Valley. (Not everybody can afford an iPhone, but Google is free to anyone with internet access). Another argument is that the breadth of Google’s activities means it is upsetting incumbents all over the world — whether it is newspapers angered by Google News; media companies threatened by YouTube (owned by Google); publishers that hate Google books; or car manufacturers who see driverless cars on the roads and worry that even their industry is vulnerable to the Valley.

Some European politicians have been explicit in their concerns that the success of the US internet giants poses a direct threat to Europe. Sigmar Gabriel, Germany’s vice-chancellor, worried aloud last year that “this (digital) infrastructure will be controlled by a handful of American internet concerns, which could dominate the economic life of the 21st century.”

One of the most vociferous corporate critics of Google is the Axel Springer publishing group in Germany, a powerful voice in Berlin and Brussels, and which provided crucial support for the election of Jean-Claude Juncker as the head of the European Commission.

President Obama seemed to buy the idea that US internet companies are the victims of European protectionism, when he argued recently that — “We (America) have owned the internet. Our companies have created it, expanded it, perfected it, in ways they can’t compete.” What Mr Obama did not add is that the US government itself has done much to damage Silicon Valley. The Snowden affair has firmly established the idea that any internet search, email or post is open to surveillance, either by the government or by the likes of Google and Facebook.

Google and other internet giants vehemently deny that they ever gave governments the keys to a secret back door into their data. Indeed, they complain that they were themselves the
victims of snooping. In an effort to regain consumer trust, the Silicon Valley firms are emphasising their new encryption technologies and privacy safeguards. But the damage is done. Concern about government snooping has become intertwined with anxiety about the commercial use of data by firms such as Google. That, in turn, has fed the appetite for the regulation of the internet.

 


Google 'illegally took content from Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor,' report finds | Technology | The Guardian

Google ‘illegally took content from Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor,’ report finds | Technology | The Guardian.

 Google has been a leading silicon valley supporter of the Obama administration. Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Google sign at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California

Google manipulated its search results to promote its own services over those of rival websites in ways that led to “real harm to consumers”, a previously unpublished report by American regulators has concluded.

The revelations were seized on by those calling for Brussels to challenge Google’s monopoly over search in Europe, and have sparked new claims that the search giant’s financing of Barack Obama’s re-election campaign swayed US regulators.

America’s Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted unanimously to end its investigation into Google in early 2013 after extracting concessions from the silicon valley company.

But documents accidentally handed to the Wall Street Journal show the FTC’s own investigators claim Google’s “conduct has resulted – and will result – in real harm to consumers and to innovation in the online search and advertising markets”.

The findings, contained in a report produced in 2012 by FTC staff to advise commissioners before their final decision on the case, claim Google also caused “harm to many vertical competitors”.


A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian

A digital public space is Britain’s missing national institution | Technology | The Guardian.

David BowieA costume from a David Bowie exhibition at the Victoria and Albert museum in central London. The V&A is under-represented in the digital world. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

A cynic might say that we have the internet we deserve. We were promised a democratic platform for change, for equality, for collaboration, yet are faced with a reality of weary cynicism, as author Charles Leadbeater wrote last summer, and an assumption that we cannot trust any organisation with our personal data.

We were told of flourishing startups and opportunities for all, yet the internet has amplified global inequalities, says Andrew Keen, a writer on the internet revolution, using the parlance of openness and opportunity to create an industry of disproportionately wealthy entrepreneurs.

And as the meaningful engagement of governments in the lives of citizens diminishes, we stare into a dystopian future described by Evgeny Morozov: Silicon Valley is heading towards a “digital socialism”, where benevolent corporations provide all the health, education, travel and housing employees could ever desire, negating the need for state provision. Ice that cake with the unpalatable truth about the reach of our government’s surveillance services and we might think our internet is already beyond help.

Commercial interests have shaped the internet, and have created such powerful organisations that governments now struggle to keep up – out-funded, out-lobbied and outwitted. Rather than reflecting the real world, the internet absorbs and amplifies it, re-presenting a version of our lives, our work and our culture, from the gross disproportion of privilege and access afforded to those even able to access the internet to the misogyny that cripples meaningful debate. Even acknowledging its infancy, the internet does not represent a version of ourselves of which we can be proud. From privacy and surveillance to our collective cultural record, where is the internet we are truly capable of? Quietly, excitedly, and in a modestly British way, there is an alternative emerging. Rather than the internet as shopping mall – defined and dominated by commercial interests – how could we build the public park of the internet?


Apple gana el juicio por monopolio en la reproducción de música en el iPod | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Apple gana el juicio por monopolio en la reproducción de música en el iPod | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.


Steve Jobs durante la presentación de iTunes en Japón en 2005. / SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI (AP)

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Un jurado de Oakland (California) falló este martes a favor de la empresa tecnológica Apple en el juicio que se libraba en su contra por presunta violación de las leyes antimonopolio al impedir reproducir en los viejosiPod música procedente de plataformas que no fueran iTunes, su propia tienda de contenidos multimedia. La demanda colectiva de una coalición de consumidores le reclamaba 350 millones de dólares. Durante el juicio, los abogados de los demandantes no dudaron en recurrir a correos enviados por el fallecido Steve Jobs, entonces en uno de los momentos más dulces de su vida, mostrando su reacción ante la posible competencia.


What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept

What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know. – The Intercept.Featured photo - What Bad, Shameful, Dirty Behavior is U.S. Judge Richard Posner Hiding? Demand to Know.

 


(updated below)

Richard Posner has been a federal appellate judge for 34 years, having been nominated by President Reagan in 1981. At a conference last week in Washington, Posner said the NSA should have the unlimited ability to collect whatever communications and other information it wants: “If the NSA wants to vacuum all the trillions of bits of information that are crawling through the electronic worldwide networks, I think that’s fine.” The NSA should have “carte blanche” to collect what it wants because “privacy interests should really have very little weight when you’re talking about national security.”

His rationale? “I think privacy is actually overvalued,” the distinguished jurist pronounced. Privacy, he explained, is something people crave in order to prevent others from learning about the shameful and filthy things they do:

Much of what passes for the name of privacy is really just trying to conceal the disreputable parts of your conduct. Privacy is mainly about trying to improve your social and business opportunities by concealing the sorts of bad activities that would cause other people not to want to deal with you. 

Unlike you and your need to hide your bad and dirty acts, Judge Posner has no need for privacy – or so he claims: “If someone drained my cell phone, they would find a picture of my cat, some phone numbers, some email addresses, some email text,” he said. “What’s the big deal?” He added: “Other people must have really exciting stuff. Do they narrate their adulteries, or something like that?”

I would like to propose a campaign inspired by Judge Posner’s claims (just by the way, one of his duties as a federal judge is to uphold the Fourth Amendment). In doing so, I’ll make the following observations:


Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”

Entrevista a Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks: “Google nos espía e informa al Gobierno de Estados Unidos”.

Escrito por Ignacio Ramonet / Le Monde Diplomatique
Lunes, 01 de Diciembre de 2014 11:59

Desde hace treinta meses, Julian Assange, paladín de la lucha por una información libre, vive en Londres, refugiado en las oficinas de la Embajada de Ecuador. Este país latinoamericano tuvo el coraje de brindarle asilo diplomático cuando el fundador de WikiLeaks se hallaba perseguido y acosado por el Gobierno de Estados Unidos y varios de sus aliados (el Reino Unido, Suecia). El único crimen de Julian Assange es haber dicho la verdad y haber difundido, vía WikiLeaks, entre otras revelaciones, las siniestras realidades ocultas de las guerras de Irak y de Afganistán, y los tejemanejes e intrigas de la diplomacia estadounidense.

Como Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning y Glenn Greenwald, Julian Assange forma parte de un nuevo grupo de disidentes que, por descubrir la verdad, son ahora rastreados, perseguidos y hostigados no por regímenes autoritarios sino por Estados que pretenden ser “democracias ejemplares”…

En su nuevo libro, Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks (Clave Intelectual, Madrid, 2014), cuya versión en español está en librerías desde el 1 de diciembre, Julian Assange va más lejos en sus revelaciones, estupendamente documentadas, como siempre. Todo parte de una larga conversación que Assange sostuvo, en junio de 2011, con Eric Schmidt, presidente ejecutivo de Google. Este vino a entrevistar al creador de WikiLeaks para un ensayo que estaba preparando sobre el futuro de la era digital. Cuando se publicó el libro, titulado The New Digital Era (2013), Assange constató que sus declaraciones habían sido tergiversadas y que las tesis defendidas por Schmidt eran considerablemente delirantes y megalomaníacas. El nuevo libro del fundador de WikiLeaks es su respuesta a esas elucubraciones del presidente de Google. Entre muchas otras cosas, Assange revela cómo Google –y Facebook, y Amazon, etc.– nos espía y nos vigila; y cómo transmite esa información a las agencias de inteligencia de Estados Unidos. Y cómo la empresa líder en tecnologías digitales tiene una estrecha relación, casi estructural, con el Departamento de Estado. Afirma también Assange, que hoy, las grandes empresas de la galaxia digital nos vigilan y nos controlan más que los propios Estados.

Cuando Google encontró a WikiLeaks es una obra inteligente, estimulante y necesaria. Una fiesta para el espíritu. Nos abre los ojos sobre nuestras propias prácticas de comunicación cotidianas cuando usamos un smartphone, una tablet, un ordenador o cuando navegamos simplemente por Internet con la candidez de quien se cree más libre que nunca. ¡Ojo! Nos explica Assange, como Pulgarcito, vas sembrando rastros de ti mismo y de tu vida privada que algunas empresas, como Google, recogen con sumo cuidado y archivan secretamente. Un día, las utilizarán contra ti…

Para conversar de todo esto y de algunas cosas más, nos encontramos con un Julian Assange entusiasta y fatigado, en Londres, el pasado 24 de octubre, en una pequeña sala acogedora de la Embajada de Ecuador. Llega sonriente y pálido, con una barba rubia de varios días, con su cabeza de ángel prerrafaelista, cabellos largos, rasgos finos, ojos claros… Es alto y delgado. Habla con voz muy baja y lenta. Lo que dice es profundo y pensado, le sale de muy adentro. Tiene un algo de gurú… Habíamos previsto charlar no más de media hora, para no cansarlo, pero con el paso del tiempo la conversación se fue poniendo interesante. Y finalmente hablamos más de dos horas y media…


Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica

Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica.

Todo este asunto de la vigilancia en Internet puede resumirse así: los gobiernos quieren más control sobre los gobernados.

Quizás pienses que tu información personal no vale nada, que no sirve de nada. Dónde estuviste ayer, por probablemente un montón de gente te vió y sabe dónde estuviste ayer.
Pero no es lo mismo la información de una persona que la de muchas personas.

Imagina que esa información personal acerca de tí es el gas dentro de un mechero/encendedor. Puede ocasionar una llama, pero no es gran cosa. Cualquiera puede tener uno de éstos.

Si ahora piensas en un cilindro/bombona de gas, que en esta analogía podría ser la información de miles de personas, hay algunas reglas, un grosor mínimo del metal, unos estándares.

Pero si quieres 12 metros cúbicos de gas butano en tu patio, o la información personal de cientos de miles de personas, hay bastante papeleo que hacer. A nadie le conviene que se acumule tanto en un lugar sin que existan los resguardos necesarios.

Y para un gasómetro o gran contenedor de gas, que sería la información personal de millones de personas, algo que puede ser tremendamente destructivo, es en el interés de todos que no te permitan hacerlo sin una cuidadosa inspección y los permisos adecuados.


Court Secretly Loosens Surveillance Rules and Expands NSA Power

 

Court Secretly Loosens Surveillance Rules and Expands NSA Power

|Jul. 8, 2013 9:52 am

 

ApprovedPublic DomainI have, oh-so-cynically, referred to the court set up under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act as a “phony baloney” court that grants rubber-stamp approval to virtually every snooping request that comes its way. Of course, I base that subjective assessment on the fact that, in 11 years, the court has denied only 10 applications, and modified a few dozen, and approved more than 15,000. The president says if people share my jaded take on such judicial review, then “we’re going to have some problems here.” But, as noted at Reason 24/7, we already have a problem, in that this rubber-stamp body is secretly transforming the laws governing surveillance, and enormously expanding the powers available to the National Security Agency,


Redes sociales y derecho a la comunicación

 

http://sitiocero.net/2013/redes-sociales-y-derecho-a-la-comunicacion/

Mauricio Tolosa Publicado: 28 abril, 2013

 

El fenómeno de los medios sociales en Internet está transformando la convivencia de las personas y comunidades en todos los ámbitos y niveles.

Hasta antes de los medios sociales, las tecnologías de la comunicación e información eran un aliado que abría posibilidades, que se insertaban bien en la lógica de las empresas y los Estados, que generaba nuevas posibilidades de expansión al modelo de desarrollo posterior a la Guerra Fría. El e-government, el e-business, el e-learning, el e-commerce, eran parte de una agenda digital que sólo traía beneficios y oportunidades de negocios y mejores servicios. Visto desde el poder, Internet tenía un efecto positivo, activador de negocios a distancia, permitía eliminar y ahorrar recursos humanos –“estos molestos seres humanos”- evitaba intermediarios, posibilitaba la publicidad a muy bajo costo. Pero súbitamente se terminó la luna de miel entre el gobierno y las tecnologías de la comunicación e información. Explosivamente aparecieron y se expandieron las redes sociales, particularmente lo que yo llamo el Tridente Facebook – Twitter – Youtube. Los ciudadanos se los apropiaron y empezaron a utilizarlos para transformar el mundo que los medios y lógicas dominantes habían construido como verdades inamovibles.