Jail for a joke: student’s case puts free speech under spotlight in Spain | World news | The Guardian

Cassandra Vera got suspended sentence for tweets about Franco-era killing in ruling her supporters say will have chilling effect

Fuente: Jail for a joke: student’s case puts free speech under spotlight in Spain | World news | The Guardian


Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian

The intelligence report’s lack of even hints at the kind of evidence collected make it difficult to assess the claims, and its weakness gave Russian officials ample opportunity to poke fun.The foreign ministry spokeswoman, Maria Zakharova, wrote on Facebook on Monday: “If ‘Russian hackers’ managed to hack anything in America, it’s two things: Obama’s brain and, of course, the report itself.”

Fuente: Russia slates ‘baseless, amateurish’ US election hacking report | World news | The Guardian


Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador

“Las noticias sobre mi muerte han sido enormemente exageradas”, escribió Snowden en su cuenta de Twitter, en la que colgó una foto del escritor estadounidense, Mark Twain, al que pertenece la famosa cita.

Fuente: Snowden desmiente su muerte en Twitter con una cita de Mark Twain – El Mostrador


Los polémicos duelos que trae la tercera versión de los “#ElectoralDeathMatch” – El Mostrador

Este juego, realizado vía Twitter, tiene por objeto indagar en las preferencias presidenciales de los usuarios de redes sociales, específicamente en Twitter.

Fuente: Los polémicos duelos que trae la tercera versión de los “#ElectoralDeathMatch” – El Mostrador


Gone bananas: China bans ‘erotic’ eating of the fruit on live streams | World news | The Guardian

China has reportedly outlawed the “erotic” online consumption of bananas after the president, Xi Jinping, called for steps to “rehabilitate” his country’s “cyber-ecology”.Speaking at a Communist party summit last year, Xi said action was needed to promote “civilised behaviour” on China’s already heavily controlled internet.

Fuente: Gone bananas: China bans ‘erotic’ eating of the fruit on live streams | World news | The Guardian


Reglamento de Subtel desata polémica en redes sociales – El Mostrador

Reglamento de Subtel desata polémica en redes sociales – El Mostrador.

El reglamento que regula la puesta en marcha de la televisión digital, cuyo texto se encuentra sometido a consulta pública en el sitio de Subtel hasta el 10 de agosto, ha despertado diversas reacciones entre ONGs y asociaciones de consumidores. Pero a las críticas de Fucatel y Conadecus, entre otros, se ha sumado ahora una profusión de tuiteros y usuarios de redes sociales que difunden caricaturas alusivas a uno de los aspectos más polémicos del texto: la forma de medir la cobertura a la que se obliga a los canales abiertos.

http://www.elmostrador.cl/media/2014/08/117.jpg


Prohíben en Tailandia videojuego que simula una dictadura – BioBioChile

Prohíben en Tailandia videojuego que simula una dictadura – BioBioChile.

Tropico 5Tropico 5

Publicado por Gabriela Ulloa | La Información es de Agencia AFP
 

La junta tailandesa prohibió un videojuego que permite entre otros crear una dictadura militar en una isla paradisíaca ficticia en la que coexisten “playas soleadas y corrupción política”, indicaron el martes las autoridades.

El juego de simulación Tropico 5 propone a los jugadores construir su propia forma de gobierno en esta isla, ya sea una “utopía socialista en la que cada ciudadano cuenta” o un sistema tiránico que convierta a la Nación en una mina de ingresos para una cuenta bancaria en Suiza.

“Tropico 5 ha sido prohibido pero no quiero indicar los motivos sin la autorización de nuestro director general”, indicó simplemente el lunes a la AFP un responsable de la oficina de vídeos y de películas del Ministerio de Cultura.


Germany 'may revert to typewriters' to counter hi-tech espionage | World news | The Guardian

Germany ‘may revert to typewriters’ to counter hi-tech espionage | World news | The Guardian.

NSA inquiry head Patrick Sensburg claims communications technology mistrusted in wake of US spying allegations

 

 

Typewriter on bench

The ultimate counter-espionage tool? Photograph: Corbis

 

German politicians are considering a return to using manual typewriters for sensitive documents in the wake of the US surveillance scandal.

The head of the Bundestag’s parliamentary inquiry into NSA activity in Germany said in an interview with the Morgenmagazin TV programme that he and his colleagues were seriously thinking of ditching email completely.

Asked “Are you considering typewriters” by the interviewer on Monday night, the Christian Democrat politican Patrick Sensburg said: “As a matter of fact, we have – and not electronic models either”. “Really?” the surprised interviewer checked. “Yes, no joke,” Sensburg responded.

“Unlike other inquiry committees, we are investigating an ongoing situation. Intelligence activities are still going on, they are happening,” said Sensburg.

Last week, Merkel’s government asked the CIA‘s station officer in Germany to leave the country after an employee of the German intelligence agency BND confessed to passing confidential documents to the US secret service. The ongoing investigation prompted speculation that the CIA may have actively targeted the Bundestag’s NSA inquiry committee.

Last year, the Russian government reportedly took similar measures after the extent of US electronic surveillance was revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The federal guard service, a powerful body tasked with protecting Russia’s highest-ranking officials, put in an order for 20 Triumph Adler typewriters, which create unique “handwriting”, that allows the source of any documents created on them to be traced.

But judging by the reaction to Sensburg’s comments, manual typewriters are unlikely to be widely adopted in German political circles.

“Before I start using typewriters and burning notes after reading, I’d rather abolish the secret services,” tweeted Martina Renner, an opposition member of the parliamentary committee investigating the activities of US and other intelligence agencies in Germany. Sahra Wagenknecht, Die Linke party’s deputy chair, described the suggestion as grotesque.

Christian Flisek, the SPD’s representative on the committee, told Spiegel Online: “This call for mechanical typewriters is making our work sound ridiculous. We live in the 21st century, where many people communicate predominantly by digital means. Effective counter-espionage works digitally too. The idea that we can protect people from surveillance by dragging them back to the typewriter is absurd.”


CIA sends out first tweet – and shows it has a sense of humour | World news | theguardian.com

CIA sends out first tweet – and shows it has a sense of humour | World news | theguardian.com.

Agency says ‘we can neither confirm nor deny that this our first tweet’ as it officially joins Twitter and Facebook

CIA central intelligence agency.
CIA central intelligence agency. Photograph: Larry Downing/Reuters

The US Central Intelligence Agency on Friday did something anathema to its usually secretive mission: it joined Twitter.

And the agency’s first tweet was, well, snarky.

We can neither confirm nor deny that this is our first tweet.

“This week, the CIA moved deeper into the world of social media with the launch of official social media accounts on Twitter and Facebook,” the intelligence agency said in a statement.

Are you a woman who wants a payrise? There's an app for that | Life and style | theguardian.com

Are you a woman who wants a payrise? There’s an app for that | Life and style | theguardian.com.

The French government has launched an app to teach leadership skills to women. Sounds very empowering, but can a phone really teach you confidence in the workplace?

 

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem

French minister for women’s rights Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. What’s on her smartphone? Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

 

You’re a woman in a French workplace and you think you deserve a payrise, but how do you go about getting one?

A) Ask for one.
B) Ask for one and cry if you don’t get it.
C) Don’t ask for one but expect the boss to know you want one.
D) Don’t ask for one, then moan when the alpha male sitting next to you, who insists on calling you “chérie”, asks and gets one.

OK, it’s a madeup dilemma, but not an entirely alien one for many French women, who are notoriously shy about asking for more money.

Now the French Ministry for Women’s Rights has published a helpful smartphone and tablet app to cover workplace conundrums for women and help them climb their chosen career ladder.

The “Leadership Pour Elles” application, launched on Monday, France’s “Equal Salary Day”, is described as an “unusual, practical and free tool to help women progress in their careers” by offering them “simple, efficient, detailed advice”.


The NSA Has An Advice Columnist. Seriously. – The Intercept

The NSA Has An Advice Columnist. Seriously. – The Intercept.

By 433
Featured photo - The NSA Has An Advice Columnist. Seriously.

What if the National Security Agency had its own advice columnist? What would the eavesdroppers ask about?

You don’t need to guess. An NSA official, writing under the pen name “Zelda,” has actually served at the agency as a Dear Abby for spies. Her “Ask Zelda!” columns, distributed on the agency’s intranet and accessible only to those with the proper security clearance, are among the documents leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. The columns are often amusing – topics include co-workers falling asleep on the job, sodas being stolen from shared fridges, supervisors not responding to emails, and office-mates who smell bad. But one of the most intriguing involves a letter from an NSA staffer who complains that his (or her) boss is spying on employees.

In the letter, which Zelda published in a column on September 9, 2011, the employee calls himself “Silenced in SID” – referring to the Signals Intelligence Directorate, the heart of the NSA’s surveillance operations. Zelda’s column, headlined “Watching Every Word in Snitch City,” offers an ironic insight into a spy agency where the spies apparently resent being spied upon.

“Dear Zelda,” the letter of complaint begins:

Here’s the scenario: when the boss sees co-workers having a quiet conversation, he wants to know what is being said (it’s mostly work related). He has his designated “snitches” and expects them to keep him apprised of all the office gossip – even calling them at home and expecting a run-down! This puts the “designees” in a really awkward position; plus, we’re all afraid any offhand comment or anything said in confidence might be either repeated or misrepresented.

Needless to say, this creates a certain amount of tension between team members who normally would get along well, and adds stress in an already stressful atmosphere. There is also an unspoken belief that he will move people to different desks to break up what he perceives as people becoming too “chummy.” (It’s been done under the guise of “creating teams.”)

Surveillance tends to sow suspicion and unease among the people who are being surveilled. Is anyone listening? Who might be the spy among us? What trouble might I get into with the things I say? These questions can eat away at the core of human relations – trust. And this is true even at the agency that is conducting the surveillance.

The letter continues:

We used to be able to joke around a little or talk about our favorite “Idol” contestant to break the tension, but now we’re getting more and more skittish about even the most mundane general conversations (“Did you have a good weekend?”). This was once a very open, cooperative group who worked well together. Now we’re more suspicious of each other and teamwork is becoming harder. Do you think this was the goal?

Silenced in SID

Zelda is shocked.

Dear Silenced,

Wow, that takes “intelligence collection” in a whole new – and inappropriate – direction. …. We work in an Agency of secrets, but this kind of secrecy begets more secrecy and it becomes a downward spiral that destroys teamwork. What if you put an end to all the secrecy by bringing it out in the open?


EEUU se jacta de espiar al mundo con caricaturesco logo: “Nada está fuera de nuestro alcance” – BioBioChile

EEUU se jacta de espiar al mundo con caricaturesco logo: “Nada está fuera de nuestro alcance” – BioBioChile.

Publicado por Christian Lealtwitter.com/ODNIgov

twitter.com/ODNIgov

Da la impresión de que, tras las revelaciones de WikiLeaks y de Edward Snowden, Estados Unidos está cambiando de estrategia sobre su programa de espionaje a nivel mundial. Ahora ya no trata de ocultarlo ni de disculparse por él, sino que lo admite y más aún: fanfarronea sobre sus intenciones.

Así quedó claro tras el lanzamiento el jueves pasado de un cohete con un grupo de satélites de vigilancia de la NSA (Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de EEUU), que de secreto tuvo muy poco, ya que la misma agencia se encargó de difundir en vivo a través de Twitter la operación.

“¿Listos para el lanzamiento? Un (cohete) Atlas 5 despegará pasadas las 23 horas llevando una carga confidencial de la NRO (Oficina Nacional de Reconocimiento) además de una docena de satélites”, afirmó el director de la Oficina Nacional de Inteligencia, James Clapper, mediante su cuenta oficial en Twitter, compartiendo incluso fotografías del evento.

Sin embargo lo que realmente sorprendió tanto a los usuarios como a los medios, fue que el tradicional logo con que se acompaña cada misión espacial parecía sacado de una comedia de espías: un pulpo con sus tentáculos envolviendo al mundo, bajo la amenazante frase “Nada está fuera de nuestro alcance”.


Jefe de espionaje gringo modeló su cuarto de guerra a partir del Enterprise de Star Trek » The Clinic Online

Jefe de espionaje gringo modeló su cuarto de guerra a partir del Enterprise de Star Trek » The Clinic Online.

Vía Yorokobu

El general Keithn Alexander, posiblemente el hombre más poderoso del mundo (ciertamente el que más información tiene disponible), parece estar jugando un juego de poder que borra las fronteras entre la ficción y la realidad, materializando en más de una forma ideas que pertenecían a la ciencia ficción.

Según revela un nuevo artículo de Foreign Policy, una de las formas en las que Alexander logró convencer a los legisladores para lanzar su masivo sistema de vigilancia digital PRISM, y para obtener fondos para igualmente masivos centros de espionaje, fue “hacerlos sentir que eran Jean-Luc Picard, capitán de la naves espacial USS Enterprise de la serie “Star Trek: Next Generation”.