Relator especial de la ONU pide que la privacidad sea una prioridad para los gobiernos del mundo | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales

“Hay poca o ninguna evidencia para persuadirme de la eficacia o la proporcionalidad de algunas medidas extremadamente intrusivas presentes en las nuevas leyes de privacidad de Francia, Alemania, el Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos”, asegura Cannataci, en un comunicado de la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de Derechos Humanos de la ONU.

Fuente: Relator especial de la ONU pide que la privacidad sea una prioridad para los gobiernos del mundo | R3D: Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales


| ¿Cuál es el rol del sector privado sobre la libertad de expresión en internet?

En su más reciente informe, el Relator Especial para la Libertad de Expresión de Naciones Unidas centra su atención en la acción del sector privado. ¿Dónde está Latinoamérica en el panorama mundial de las grandes empresas de internet?

Fuente: | ¿Cuál es el rol del sector privado sobre la libertad de expresión en internet?


Living Under Digital Surveillance: Human Rights Defender Perceptions and Experiences | Front Line Defenders

In November 2015, at the Eighth Dublin Platform for Human Rights Defenders, Front Line Defenders (FLD) asked human rights defenders (HRDs) from across Asia, Africa, Americas, Europe and the Middle East/North Africa to share experiences of living under digital surveillance and the perceived impact this has on their work and lives.

Fuente: Living Under Digital Surveillance: Human Rights Defender Perceptions and Experiences | Front Line Defenders


Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian

Five hundred prominent names, including Ai Weiwei and Mairead Maguire, accuse countries of undermining UN human rights covenants

Fuente: Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian


Data privacy: the tide is turning in Europe – but is it too little, too late? | Technology | The Guardian

Data privacy: the tide is turning in Europe – but is it too little, too late? | Technology | The Guardian.

Simultaneous legal cases suggest that the need to assert the digital rights of citizens over corporations and governments is finally being addressed

Max Schrems
Cases such as Max Schrems’ lawsuit against Facebook are asserting fundamental rights of privacy and data protection. Photograph: Max Schrems/Europe-V-Facebook.or/PA

Amazon Dash – the company’s single purpose internet-connected ordering button – may soon be blackening our skies with drones delivering loo rolls and detergent. And so, the relentless march of technology – not to mention cheap labour, unthinking consumerism and scandalous environmental devastation – goes on.

But while more convenient ordering of washing powder might have captured the headlines of late, Europe has been in the midst of a technological step change; a pivot in the world of data privacy.

Several notable events at the end of March, in Luxembourg, London and Geneva, show a glimmer of hope that those frail, beaten rights – privacy and data protection – might yet see their true worth in the digital age.

A moment, first, in defence of privacy – reports of whose death are, I hope, greatly exaggerated.

Privacy is a right for all – not just the filthy rich

Many fall into the trap of seeing privacy in an overly atomistic, individualistic, selfish way; the preserve of the filthy rich. And it is, if we see it as separable from collective freedom, or as absolute over other rights – of freedom of expression, opinion and association; freedom to protest; freedom to resist. But this is not privacy’s ask.

Privacy is about having decisional power, control, over which acts and events of our lives are disclosed and to whom, free from the prying eyes of states, corporations and neighbours. Privacy affords us the freedom to develop ourselves in the world.

The crux of the issue with digital technology is that our ability to make decisions and to control our personal information – the links and traces of our lives – is all but lost. Mostly without our knowledge, and certainly without informed consent, nation states sweep our data alleging ‘national security’ interests, whether legitimate or not. Corporations sweep our data, because they have powerful economic incentives to do so – and, with the capitalist lurch, no reason not to.

So what can be done to reclaim this systematic erosion; to reinstate rights over the long echo of our digital whispers and wanderings? In Europe, there are some rumblings of resistance. They are the rumblings of citizens, of regulators, of courts. And they are starting to find their voice.


G1 – Dilma vai defender na ONU normas internacionais contra espionagem – notícias em Mundo

G1 – Dilma vai defender na ONU normas internacionais contra espionagem – notícias em Mundo.

Presidente viaja neste domingo (22) a NY e participa de Assembleia-Geral.
Figueiredo terá reunião bilateral com John Kerry para tratar de espionagem.

Nathalia Passarinho

As ações de espionagem dos Estados Unidos a correspondências do governo brasileiro serão um dos principais temas do discurso da presidente Dilma Rousseff na abertura da Assembleia-Geral das Nações Unidas, na próxima terça-feira (24). Ela embarca na noite deste domingo (22) para Nova York, onde fica a sede da ONU.

Primeira chefe de Estado a discursar, a presidente deverá pedir que as ações de inteligência entre nações sejam regulamentadas pelas Nações Unidas. Dilma quer que o organismo internacional crie normas específicas e limites a ações de espionagem para coibir excessos. A presidente deverá ainda fazer uma defesa do respeito à soberania dos países e à privacidade de correspondências na internet.

A fala antecede o discurso do presidente norte-americano, Barack Obama, que subirá à tribuna da Assembleia das Nações Unidas logo após Dilma. Na última terça-feira (17), a presidente anunciou o adiamento da viagem que faria em outubro a Washington, nos Estados Unidos.
A decisão foi motivada pelas denúncias de que a NSA, agencia de segurança norte-americana, espionou Dilma, seus assessores e também a Petrobras, segundo revelou o programaFantástico.