Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy

The termination of the Swedish investigation is, in one sense, good news for Assange. But it is unlikely to change his inability to leave the embassy any time soon. If anything, given the apparent determination of the Trump administration to put him in a U.S. prison cell for the “crime” of publishing documents, his freedom appears further away than it has since 2010, when the Swedish case began.

Fuente: Sweden Withdraws Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, but He Still Faces Serious Legal Jeopardy


Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian

Five hundred prominent names, including Ai Weiwei and Mairead Maguire, accuse countries of undermining UN human rights covenants

Fuente: Assange supporters condemn UK and Sweden in open letter | Media | The Guardian


The Pirate Bay set to return on 1 February | Technology | The Guardian

The Pirate Bay set to return on 1 February | Technology | The Guardian.

Pirate Bay phoenix
 The Pirate Bay appears set to sail again on 1 February like a phoenix from the ashes of a police raid. Photograph: Screengrab

Pirate Bay’s revival seems certain after the torrent site has started to display a logo of phoenix with a timer counting down to 1 February.

The timer was unveiled last week along with a revived but non-functioning site. Now the phoenix, a symbol of rebirth used by the Pirate Bay in previous relaunches of the site, has replaced the iconic battleship logo and the animated waving pirate flag.

On the homepage, the Pirate Bay battleship travels towards a cartoon of an island harbour named “welcome home”, now positioned overlapping the island.


Pirate Bay 'Copycats' Flourish After Raid | TorrentFreak

Pirate Bay ‘Copycats’ Flourish After Raid | TorrentFreak.

More than three days have passed since The Pirate Bay went down after a raid on a Swedish datacenter. While there is still no sign that TPB is preparing a comeback, several copies of the popular torrent site are drawing in hundreds of thousands of visitors.

pirate bayThe torrent community is still shaken up by the abruptraid on the Pirate Bay this week.

With millions of visitors a day TPB was one of the largest websites on the Internet and despite the police action its users remain hungry for fresh content.

We previously reported that other large torrent sites have noticed a significant uptick in traffic in recent days. However, many of TPB’s users are eagerly waiting for the original site to return.

Thus far it’s still unclear whether the site will return in the near future, if at all. Our queries to find out more remain unanswered for now.

Meanwhile there’s a ‘worrying’ development that Pirate Bay “copies” are gaining a lot of momentum. While none of these sites are associated with The Pirate Bay they are happy to welcome the extra visitors.

First a word of caution. None of the sites below are related to the “official” site and visitors should beware of scams and malware.


Swedish police raid sinks The Pirate Bay | Technology | The Guardian

Swedish police raid sinks The Pirate Bay | Technology | The Guardian.

the pirate bay logo

 The Pirate Bay has been taken offline by police raids in Sweden. Photograph: The Pirate Bay

Swedish police have raided and seized computer and server equipment in Stockholm, taking the notorious piracy site the Pirate Bay offline.

The site, which has survived the arrest and jailing of its founders, several attempts to remove it from the internet and blockade by internet service providers (ISPs) in the UK and internationally, has been unavailable for more than 24 hours.

“We had a crackdown on a server room in greater Stockholm because of a copyright infringement, and yes it was Pirate Bay,” said Paul Pinter, national co-ordinator for intellectual property crime at Stockholm County Police.

He said that Rights Alliance, a Swedish anti-piracy group, had made the complaint. Sara Lindback, its head, said that Pirate Bay was “an illegal commercial service” making “considerable earnings by infringing the works of others”.

Servers and computers seized

Sources quoted by BitTorrent news site TorrentFreak have confirmed that the servers seized in the raid belonged to the Pirate Bay. Despite several sites appearing to be the piracy site briefly coming back online, it has not yet been resurrected.

Several sites affiliated with the Pirate Bay, including EZTV, Zoink, Torrage, Istole, bayimg.com, pastebay.net and Pirate Bay’s internet forum suprbay.org, have also been taken offline.

Fredrik Ingblad, a Swedish intellectual property crime prosecutor, said: “There were a number of police officers and digital forensics experts there. This took place during the morning and continued until this afternoon. Several servers and computers were seized, but I cannot say exactly how many.”

It is not known whether Swedish authorities also seized the Pirate Bay domain names as part of their action against the piracy site.

The Pirate Bay has been blocked at the ISP level in the UK since 2012. Users of the site have been able to circumvent the court-ordered block by accessing proxy sites, which replicate the Pirate Bay services and pull data from the main site when a user accesses them operating as a relay.

Many of these proxy sites are still operating despite the primary Pirate Bay site being taken offline, but they have no data of their own and are essentially crippled by the removal of the Pirate Bay from the internet.


Pirate Bay founder arrested after two years on the run | Technology | theguardian.com

Pirate Bay founder arrested after two years on the run | Technology | theguardian.com.

Peter Sunde had been wanted by Interpol over an outstanding sentence for copyright violations Reuters in Stockholm
sunde

Peter Sunde has been arrested after being on the run for two years, and wanted by Interpol. Photograph: Richard Saker for the Guardian

One of the founders of file-sharing website Pirate Bay has been arrested in southern Sweden to serve an outstanding sentence for copyright violations after being on the run for nearly two years, Swedish police have said.

Peter Sunde had been wanted by Interpol since 2012 after being sentenced in Sweden to prison and fined for breaching copyright laws.

“We have been looking for him since 2012,” said Carolina Ekeus, spokeswoman at the Swedish national police board. “He was given eight months in jail so he has to serve his sentence.”

Ekeus said Sunde had been arrested on Saturday in the southern Swedish county of Skane but she was not able to provide further details.

Four men linked to Pirate Bay were originally sentenced to one year in prison and a fine of £2.85m. An appeals court later reduced the prison sentences by varying amounts, but raised the fine to £4.1m.

In September, 2012, Cambodia arrested and deported another Pirate Bay co-founder at Sweden’s request.

Swedish media reported on Saturday that Sunde may have been living in Germany in recent years and that Sweden’s supreme court had as recently as May rejected an appeal from him.

“He is extremely talented and I still think that the judgment was wrong,” Peter Althin, who defended Sunde during the trial, was quoted as saying by Swedish news service TT.

“It’s about being on the cutting edge if one is going to be successful … But if one is too far ahead it is not always about success. Peter fought for file-sharing and in 10 years I think it goes without saying that file-sharing for one’s own needs will be allowed.”

Pirate Bay, launched in 2003, provided links to music and movie files that were stored on other users’ computers. Swedish subsidiaries of prominent music and film companies had taken the company to court claiming damages for lost revenue.

Despite the Swedish court case, the website is still functioning. On its website, Pirate Bay says it is now run by a different organisation and is registered in the Seychelles.


Snowden, Greenwald, Appelbaum, WikiLeaks 'blacklisted' from Stockholm Internet Forum — RT News

Snowden, Greenwald, Appelbaum, WikiLeaks ‘blacklisted’ from Stockholm Internet Forum — RT News.

Published time: May 27, 2014 16:36

Image from David Michael Miranda's facebook page

Image from David Michael Miranda’s facebook page

Key digital rights activists – including Edward Snowden and hacker Jacob Appelbaum – have been blacklisted from the Stockholm Internet Forum (SIF) on internet openness and freedom. The move has caused a stir at the gathering and outraged Twitter users.

The third annual European meeting of internet activists kicked off in Sweden on May 26, with its main theme being “Internet– privacy, transparency, surveillance and control.”

But strangely enough, those whose names immediately spring to mind when it comes to the issue of surveillance were not allowed to attend the event.

Former CIA employee Edward Snowden, who revealed the NSA’s mass spying program, was not invited. Neither was journalist Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story.

Hacker Jacob Appelbaum, who found German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s mobile phone number in Snowden’s database, didn’t receive an invitation either.

The conference also failed to invite representatives of WikiLeaks, which repeatedly made headlines worldwide by leaking diplomatic cables.

According to German magazine Cicero Online, the only non-governmental organization among the hosts of the conference – .SE – had made a list of possible candidates and sent it to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for approval.The ministry vetoed the activists from attending the SIF – the brainchild of Foreign Minister Carl Bildt. Snowden’s name was marked red, the magazine wrote, suggesting that could be code for “do not invite.”