The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian

If world leaders can deceive voters about the greatest foreign policy debacle in a generation, why should a president today worry about casually lying about the crowds at his inauguration?

Fuente: The stench of the Iraq war lingers behind today’s preoccupation with fake news | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian


With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian

The rise of the internet may have created our current predicament, but the people who populate the internet can help us get out of it. Next time you go back and forth with someone over a controversial issue online, stick to facts with good sources, and engage in open dialogue. Most importantly, be nice. You may end up being a small part of the process whereby information chaos becomes knowledge.

Fuente: With the power of online transparency, together we can beat fake news | Jimmy Wales | Opinion | The Guardian


A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs

The phrase “Fake News” has exploded in usage since the election, but the term is similar to other malleable political labels such as “terrorism” and “hate speech”; because the phrase lacks any clear definition, it is essentially useless except as an instrument of propaganda and censorship. The most important fact to realize about this new term: Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Fuente: A Clinton Fan Manufactured Fake News That MSNBC Personalities Spread to Discredit WikiLeaks Docs


Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data

“DeepMind/Google are getting a free pass for swift and broad access into the NHS, on the back of persuasive but unproven promises of efficiency and innovation,” said Ms Powles. “We do not know——and have no power to find out——what Google and DeepMind are really doing with NHS patient data, nor the extent of Royal Free’s meaningful control over what DeepMind is doing.”

Fuente: Fears raised over Google’s DeepMind deal to use NHS medical data


WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen

WikiLeaks, definida por su fundador, Julian Assange como “una gran biblioteca de la rebelión”, lleva diez años publicando más información secreta que todos los demás medios de prensa combinados. Las revelaciones informaron al público sobre tratados secretos, vigilancia masiva, ataques contra civiles, torturas y asesinatos cometido por los gobiernos de EE.UU. y otros países.

Fuente: WikiLeaks: Diez años por la transparencia informativa | Resumen


A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian

The study found that over the last three months of the election campaign, 20 top-performing false election stories from hoax sites and hyper-partisan blogs generated 8,711,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook, whereas the 20 best-performing election stories from 19 major news websites generated a total of 7,367,000 shares, reactions and comments. In other words, if you run a social networking site, fake news is good for business, even if it’s bad for democracy.

Fuente: A moment of truth for Mark Zuckerberg | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian


Facebook announces new push against fake news after Obama comments | Technology | The Guardian

Facebook has “reached out” to “respected fact-checking organizations” for third-party verification, Zuckerberg said, though he did not provide specifics. He said the company also planned to make reporting false stories easier and to create “better technical systems to detect what people will flag as false before they do it themselves”.

Fuente: Facebook announces new push against fake news after Obama comments | Technology | The Guardian


In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever

One of the very few remaining avenues for learning what the U.S. government is doing — beyond the propaganda that it wants Americans to ingest and thus deliberately disseminates through media outlets — is leaking and whistleblowing. Among the leading U.S. heroes in the war on terror have been the men and women inside various agencies of the U.S. government who discovered serious wrongdoing being carried out in secret, and then risked their own personal welfare to ensure that the public learned of what never should have been hidden in the first place.

Fuente: In the Trump Era, Leaking and Whistleblowing Are More Urgent, and More Noble, Than Ever


In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots

To see how extreme and damaging this behavior has become, let’s just quickly examine two utterly false claims that Democrats over the past four days — led by party-loyal journalists — have disseminated and induced thousands of people, if not more, to believe.

Fuente: In the Democratic Echo Chamber, Inconvenient Truths Are Recast as Putin Plots


NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees

Booz Allen Hamilton, the defense contracting giant whose employee was charged Wednesday in connection with the theft of hacking codes used by the National Security Agency, provides a fairly ironic service to the government: spotting rogue employees.

Fuente: NSA Theft Suspect Worked For Contractor That Sells the Government Tech for Spotting Rogue Employees


NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian

Shares183Save for laterThe FBI has arrested a National Security Agency contractor on suspicion of the theft of top secret classified data and documents in an alleged security breach at the same intelligence agency whose spy secrets were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Fuente: NSA contractor arrested for alleged theft of top secret classified information | US news | The Guardian


Privacy Scandal Haunts Pokemon Go’s CEO

The suddenly vast scale of Pokemon Go adoption is matched by the game’s aggressive use of personal information. Unlike, say, Twitter, Facebook, or Netflix, the app requires uninterrupted use of your location and camera — a “trove of sensitive user data,” as one privacy watchdog put it in a concerned letter to federal regulators.All the more alarming, then, that Pokemon Go is run by a man whose team literally drove one of the greatest privacy debacles of the internet era, in which Google vehicles, in the course of photographing neighborhoods for the Street View feature of the company’s online maps, secretly copied digital traffic from home networks, scooping up passwords, email messages, medical records, financial information, and audio and video files.

Fuente: Privacy Scandal Haunts Pokemon Go’s CEO


¿Cuáles son las responsabilidades que conlleva una filtración? | Derechos Digitales

Cada cierto tiempo surgen nuevas noticias que dan cuenta de cómo hackers y whistleblowers develan información de interés público, usualmente política. Incluso en algunos países latinoamericanos se han creado plataformas que permiten hacer denuncias anónimas, siguiendo la misma tendencia. Esta actividad ha venido a suplir la falta de canales formales de acceso a la información pública, pero pueden presentar algunos problemas.

Fuente: ¿Cuáles son las responsabilidades que conlleva una filtración? | Derechos Digitales


¿Para qué necesitamos anonimato y por qué es importante defenderlo? | Derechos Digitales

En la medida en que nuestras vidas transcurren en internet de forma creciente e interactuamos cada vez más con tecnologías digitales, también se vuelve más sencillo identificarnos y recolectar información sobre nuestros hábitos, gustos, opiniones e incluso sobre nuestros cuerpos.

Fuente: ¿Para qué necesitamos anonimato y por qué es importante defenderlo? | Derechos Digitales


The Princeton Web Census: a 1-million-site measurement and analysis of web privacy

Today I’m pleased to release initial analysis results from our monthly, 1-million-site measurement. This is the largest and most detailed measurement of online tracking to date, including measurements for stateful (cookie-based) and stateless (fingerprinting-based) tracking, the effect of browser privacy tools, and “cookie syncing”. These results represent a snapshot of web tracking, but the analysis is part of an effort to collect data on a monthly basis and analyze the evolution of web tracking and privacy over time.

Fuente: The Princeton Web Census: a 1-million-site measurement and analysis of web privacy


Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital

Una de las actividades más importantes que realizan las personas en el entorno digital es la manifestación de sus opiniones y la búsqueda y difusión de información sobre diferentes temáticas. De esta manera, Internet se ha vuelto uno de los ámbitos más importantes para que las personas ejerzan el derecho a la libertad de expresión.

Fuente: Libertad de expresión en el ámbito digital • ADC Digital


¿Cómo se verifica que yo soy yo en Internet? Una mirada a los proyectos de identificación electrónica en la región « Digital Rights

A medida que aumenta la penetración de Internet y se incrementan los trámites que el gobierno nos ofrece por este medio, aumenta el problema para definir cuáles son los procesos válidos para la autenticación electrónica de usuarios, su identificación y las firmas electrónicas de documentos que se requieren en los diferentes trámites. Sobre todo porque en el mundo crece la suplantación y el robo de identidad asociados a fraudes.

Fuente: ¿Cómo se verifica que yo soy yo en Internet? Una mirada a los proyectos de identificación electrónica en la región « Digital Rights


El “derecho al olvido” y los derechos humanos en América Latina y el Caribe: imprecisiones conceptuales, imprecisiones históricas « Digital Rights

En agosto de 2015, la Ciudad de México fue sede de la 8va reunión preparatoria para el Foro de Gobernanza de Internet (LACIGF8). Allí, representantes de todos los sectores involucrados en el tema, venidos de América Latina y el Caribe, se reunieron para intercambiar experiencias y discutir los desafíos para la construcción de un Internet libre y de acceso universal. En la última década la región ha experimentado avances increíbles, sin embargo, los viejos problemas, como la concentración de acceso –a raíz de la concentración del ingreso– o la calidad de las redes, permanecen. Además, surgen nuevas preguntas, como los límites de acción del Estado en la lucha contra la delincuencia informática y las fronteras entre la libertad de expresión y el discurso de odio.

Fuente: El “derecho al olvido” y los derechos humanos en América Latina y el Caribe: imprecisiones conceptuales, imprecisiones históricas « Digital Rights


Uber proporcionó datos de 14 millones de usuarios a agencias reguladoras de Estados Unidos – 20minutos.es

La plataforma informó sobre 12,2 millones de usuarios de julio a diciembre. California, con más de 5,7 millones de datos y Nueva York, con más de 3, fueron las zonas en las que Uber dio más información a las autoridades. El estudio divide la entrega de información en función de si se trata de requerimientos legales ordinario o está relacionado con investigaciones criminales.

Fuente: Uber proporcionó datos de 14 millones de usuarios a agencias reguladoras de Estados Unidos – 20minutos.es


Google handed €100,000 fine by French data regulator – FT.com

Google has been handed a €100,000 fine by France’s privacy watchdog over allegations that it has not properly applied Europe’s “right to be forgotten” across the world, despite recent concessions made by the internet company to satisfy regulators

Fuente: Google handed €100,000 fine by French data regulator – FT.com


Projeto dá mais poder à polícia e ao Ministério Público para investigar crimes na internet — Senado Federal – Portal de Notícias

As autoridades encarregadas de investigar crimes praticados pela internet poderão ter seus poderes ampliados. O Projeto de Lei do Senado (PLS) 730/2015, do senador Otto Alencar (PSD-BA), permite que delegado de polícia ou membro do Ministério Público requisitem informações a provedor de internet, em caso de suspeita de atos ilícitos na rede mundial de computadores.

Fuente: Projeto dá mais poder à polícia e ao Ministério Público para investigar crimes na internet — Senado Federal – Portal de Notícias


Google confirms it will extend E.U. right-to-be-forgotten to all Google Search domains from next week | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers

Google has confirmed previous reports that it is to comply with European regulators requesting that the Internet giant extend the scope of the so-called “right-to-be-forgotten” legislation beyond that of European search engines.

Fuente: Google confirms it will extend E.U. right-to-be-forgotten to all Google Search domains from next week | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers


Technology comes to the rescue in migrant crisis – FT.com

Funzi.mobi informs migrants about Finnish rules and attitudes towards sexuality, Refugeesonrails.org distributes donated laptops and teaches migrants programming so they can land a dream job, and Refugees-Welcome.net is a kind of Airbnb for migrants,

Fuente: Technology comes to the rescue in migrant crisis – FT.com


Facebook: Términos de privacidad: ¿de verdad estuviste de acuerdo con eso? | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Un estudio de Harvard examina la evolución de la política de privacidad de Facebook y concluye que, en diez años, ha empeorado

Fuente: Facebook: Términos de privacidad: ¿de verdad estuviste de acuerdo con eso? | Tecnología | EL PAÍS


¿Quién combate en la guerrilla por el acceso abierto? | Manzana Mecánica

¿Quién combate en la guerrilla por el acceso abierto? | Manzana Mecánica.

La información es poder (decía Aaron Swartz en el manifiesto por la guerrilla del acceso abierto) y como todo poder concentrado en pocas personas o instituciones, hay que combatirlo. El conocimiento científico ha estado por años secuestrado por leyes y personas, lo cual significa, en términos simples, que muchos debemos privarnos del conocimiento científico adquirido por nuestros antepasados o personas de nuestra misma generación o más jóvenes. Editoriales como Elsevier, Springer o Wiley (que sería como decir Coca-Cola o Pepsi) tienen el negocio perfecto al secuestrar el conocimiento en sus manos, sacando provecho económico y moral de ello. Afortunadamente, existen algunas iniciativas de individuos y agrupaciones que luchan contra estas editoriales e incluso contra las mismas personas que desarrollan conocimiento y solo “comparten” sus conocimientos con una editorial. En esta ocasión, trataré de dar un panorama general sobre quiénes están involucrados en esta guerrilla, cómo lo hacen y cómo puedes beneficiarte, tú y a tu comunidad, usando el material disponible.

¿Cómo funciona la guerrilla?

Primero, es necesario tener en cuenta que la guerrilla del acceso abierto es muy dispersa. Esto sucede al tener distintas personas trabajando con una idea en común, pero no en un trabajo coordinado necesariamente, por lo que tú misma(o) podrías ser parte importante, sin que nosotros sepamos. Dicho esto, también es cierto que existen algunos proyectos notables, que han logrado formar grandes bases de datos de documentos del conocimiento universal (ese mismo que nos pertenece a todos) y que por ende, son los que atraen más luces al ser expuestos. Todos los proyectos que se mencionarán aquí nacen, viven y mueren en internet. Fuera de esta red es difícil la difusión del material, debido a la limitancia de obtener el material a gran escala, por lo que es importante considerar que son vulnerables a cualquier ataque gubernamental o corporativo (como el caso de library.nu o más conocido, The Pirate Bay).

En la batalla por el acceso al conocimiento, la guerrilla busca expropiar el conocimiento de las manos de quienes limitan su acceso a la mayoría de la población. A diferencia de lo que ocurre con objetos materiales, la expropiación del conocimiento ocurre en el terreno inmaterial de lo digital

Uno de los conceptos fundamentales de la “guerrilla del acceso abierto” es “expropiar” aquellas publicaciones que están en manos de las editoriales que continuamente publican material creado por científicos del mundo (generalmente del primer mundo, dicho sea de paso). Esto significa quitar el poder de la editorial (universidad, organización, o lo que sea) de contar con la distribución exclusiva de conocimiento que se ha hecho gracias al desarrollo de la humanidad. Al contrario de una expropiación de un objeto material, la expropiación del conocimiento ocurre principalmente en términos digitales. Por lo tanto, su distribución y copia es mucho más fácil que tener que transcribir, fotocopiar, copiar disquetes, CDs, o lo que sea en un futuro. Sumado a esto, cuando uno está en medio de un problema que requiere conocimiento científico (puede ser incluso un problema de salud de algún familiar o de ti mismo, de algún problema de ingeniería al cual se necesite palear o lo que se te ocurra) por lo general requiere verificar información muy particular, haciendo que sea necesario contar con algunas publicaciones muy específicas. Si la publicación que requieres no está, simplemente no funcionará para ti y posiblemente lo desecharás. Es por esto que para generar un proyecto comunitario o personal es necesario poder acceder a grandes cantidades de datos y, por supuesto, distribuirlos.


¿Reemplazar Gmail y Dropbox por una alternativa segura? Nadim Kobeissi (@kaepora) muestra que es posible | Manzana Mecánica

¿Reemplazar Gmail y Dropbox por una alternativa segura? Nadim Kobeissi (@kaepora) muestra que es posible | Manzana Mecánica.

Peerio es un innovador sistema de mensajería y almacenamiento con énfasis en ser fácil de usar, permitir comunicaciones seguras y la posibilidad de compartir grandes archivos. Utiliza encriptación punto-a-punto, lo que significa que la gente que opera Peerio intencionalmente excluye la posibilidad de tener acceso a tus mensajes o tus archivos.

Para registrarse en Peerio, hay que descargar alguno de los programas disponibles: hay versiones para Google Chrome (multi-platforma), Windows y Mac, y versiones para Android e iOS están en desarrollo. Es necesario descargar el programa porque la encriptación ocurre localmente, algo que no es posible hacer de forma completamente segura cuando uno utiliza un sitio web, a menos que uno confíe ciegamente en los desarrolladores de tal sitio (que en general no es buena idea).


Memoria digital, a gusto del consumidor – 28.08.2014 – lanacion.com  

Memoria digital, a gusto del consumidor – 28.08.2014 – lanacion.com  .

Por   | Para LA NACION

Esas palabras de Friedrich Nietzsche resuenan en los reclamos que hoy se alzan contra los motores de búsqueda como Google o Yahoo y reivindican el “derecho al olvido” en Internet. Es decir, el derecho a que se borren de la Web datos personales que, más allá de que hayan sido ciertos, en la actualidad perjudican de algún modo al demandante.

Amparados en la insólita decisión de la Unión Europea, que en mayo de este año resolvió que Google debe atender las peticiones de los usuarios cuando soliciten el borrado de contenidos que los afectan negativamente, han proliferado los procesos judiciales que buscan limitar la información disponible.

Ese reconocimiento tan reciente del “derecho al olvido” remueve algunos cimientos de nuestra tradición filosófica y hace surgir la duda: ¿estaría consumándose, por fin, en pleno siglo XXI, aquel feliz desprendimiento de las garras de la memoria, defendido por el filósofo alemán en 1873? Quizás sí, aunque no exactamente. Porque lo que entendemos por memoria y olvido, incluso por “ser alguien” y la relación que eso implica con los propios recuerdos, todo eso suele cambiar con los vaivenes de la historia. Y tal vez se haya reconfigurado de modos inesperados en los últimos tiempos.


Wikipedia swears to fight 'censorship' of 'right to be forgotten' ruling | Technology | theguardian.com

Wikipedia swears to fight ‘censorship’ of ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling | Technology | theguardian.com.

Announcing its first transparency report, Wikipedia reveals that Google has received five requests remove links to its pages

 

 

(L-R) General Counsel or the Wikimedia Foundation, Geoff Brigham; Wikimedia Foundation Chief Executive, Lila Tretikov and Wikipedia co-founder, Jimmy Wales, attend a press conference in central London on August 6, 2014 ahead of the Wikimania conference.
(L-R) General Counsel or the Wikimedia Foundation, Geoff Brigham; Wikimedia Foundation Chief Executive, Lila Tretikov and Wikipedia co-founder, Jimmy Wales, attend a press conference in central London on August 6, 2014 ahead of the Wikimania conference. Photograph: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images

 

Wikipedia’s founder Jimmy Wales has revealed new details about what he describes as the site’s “censorship” under the EU’s “right to be forgotten” laws.

Wales revealed that Google has been asked to remove five links to Wikipedia in the last week. Now the Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit group which runs the collaboratively edited encyclopaedia, has posted the notices of removal from Google online.

Among the articles removed from search results are an image of a young man playing a guitar, a page about the former criminal Gerry Hutch, and a page about the Italian gangster Renato Vallanzasca.

Speaking at the launch of Wikimedia’s transparency report, Wales attacked people who would use the “right to be forgotten” ruling to remove links to Wikipedia.

“History is a human right and one of the worst things that a person can do is attempt to use force to silence another,” he said. “I’ve been in the public eye for quite some time. Some people say good things, some people say bad things … that’s history, and I would never use any kind of legal process like to try to suppress it.”

Wales, who founded Wikipedia in 2001, has been outspoken against the right to be forgotten, frequently describing it as “censorship” and “tyrannical”.

He argued that Google’s decision over what to index should be seen as “editorial judgement”, the same as a newspaper’s decision about what goes on its front page, and that the state interfering in that decision is censorious.

Google has always argued that it does not want to impose editorial judgment over its search results, and emphasises the “neutrality” of machine-determined results.

Geoff Brigham, Wikipedia’s general counsel, said that many more links may have been removed without Wikimedia’s knowledge.

“We only know about these removals because the involved search engine company chose to send notices to the Wikimedia Foundation,” he said. “Search engines have no legal obligation to send such notices. Indeed, their ability to continue to do so may be in jeopardy.

“Since search engines are not required to provide affected sites with notice, other search engines may have removed additional links from their results without our knowledge. This lack of transparent policies and procedures is only one of the many flaws in the European decision.”


Ann Cavoukian and Christopher Wolf: Sorry, but there’s no online ‘right to be forgotten’

Ann Cavoukian and Christopher Wolf: Sorry, but there’s no online ‘right to be forgotten’.

Ann Cavoukian and Christopher Wolf, National Post
Wednesday, Jun. 25, 2014

Damian Dovarganes/The Associated Press files

In a week-long series, National Post contributors reflect on a recent European Court of Justice judgment requiring Internet search providers to remove links to embarrassing information. Should Canadian citizens have a ‘right to be forgotten’?

A man walks into a library. He asks to see the librarian. He tells the librarian there is a book on the shelves of the library that contains truthful, historical information about his past conduct, but he says he is a changed man now and the book is no longer relevant. He insists that any reference in the library’s card catalog and electronic indexing system associating him with the book be removed, or he will go to the authorities.

The librarian refuses, explaining that the library does not make judgments on people, but simply offers information to readers to direct them to materials from which they can make their own judgment in the so-called “marketplace of ideas.” The librarian goes on to explain that if the library had to respond to such requests, it would become a censorship body — essentially the arbiter of what information should remain accessible to the public. Moreover, if it had to respond to every such request, the burden would be enormous and there would be no easy way to determine whether a request was legitimate or not. The indexing system would become swiss cheese, with gaps and holes. And, most importantly, readers would be deprived of access to historical information that would allow them to reach their own conclusions about people and events.

The librarian gives this example: What if someone is running for office but wants to hide something from his unsavory past by blocking access to the easiest way for voters to uncover those facts? Voters would be denied relevant information, and democracy would be impaired.

The man is not convinced, and calls a government agent. The government agent threatens to fine or jail the librarian if he does not comply with the man’s request to remove the reference to the unflattering book in the library’s indexing system.

Is this a scenario out of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four? No, this is the logical extension of a recent ruling from Europe’s highest court, which ordered Google to remove a link to truthful information about a person, because that person found the information unflattering and out of date. (The scale of online indexing would of course be dramatically more comprehensive than a library indexing system.)


Only the powerful will benefit from the 'right to be forgotten' | Mark Stephens | Comment is free | The Guardian

Only the powerful will benefit from the ‘right to be forgotten’ | Mark Stephens | Comment is free | The Guardian.


The European search engine ruling weakens our democratic foundations and could lead to our history being rewritten
'Those with the resources to pursue complaints are likely to be political and business elites.'

‘Those with the resources to pursue complaints are likely to be political and business elites about whom the public should demand unfettered search results.’ Photograph: Datacraft/Getty Images/Sozaijiten

Last week’s judgment by the European court of justice allowing anyone to demand that a search engine should remove unwanted information from its index – even if it is accurate, lawful, and publicly available elsewhere – is a dangerous step in the wrong direction.

Since the ruling an ex-politician seeking re-election, a man convicted of possessing child abuse images and a doctor seeking to remove negative reviews from patients, are reported to be among the first to send takedown notices to Google. Privacy is a universal right that must be protected, but this overreaching judgment is far more likely to aid the powerful in attempts to rewrite history, than afford individuals more influence over their online identities.

Last June the EU’s advocate general argued that search engine suppression of legitimate public domain information “would amount to censorship”. The ruling, in a case brought by a Spanish citizen about links to the auctioning of his home that appeared in search results, allows individuals to petition search engine operators – a term that, as well as Google, could also include Facebook, Microsoft, Baidu, Yandex, DuckDuckGo and more – to remove content they consider “inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant”.

What’s more, it puts companies in the nearly impossible position of deciding what information meets this vague threshold. Holding intermediaries responsible for determining what information is in the public interest is dangerous and unworkable: more than 100 billion searches occur each month on Google alone, which could in theory be subject to review-on-demand for adequacy and relevance, rather than accuracy or lawfulness.

The unprecedented burden the court seeks to place on online intermediaries would damage the internet for all users, especially those in Europe. Online innovation stemming from the internet, from search engines to social media, has been made possible by protecting intermediaries, not by incentivising them to censor information.

The individuals with the motivation and resources to pursue complaints are likely to be those political and business elites about whom the public interest should demand unfettered search results. And companies will face pressure to remove whatever is asked of them rather than face the legal costs of challenging illegitimate requests.


How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations – The Intercept

How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations – The Intercept.

By 
Featured photo - How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy ReputationsA page from a GCHQ top secret document prepared by its secretive JTRIG unit

One of the many pressing stories that remains to be told from the Snowden archive is how western intelligence agencies are attempting to manipulate and control online discourse with extreme tactics of deception and reputation-destruction. It’s time to tell a chunk of that story, complete with the relevant documents.

Over the last several weeks, I worked with NBC News to publish a series of articles about “dirty trick” tactics used by GCHQ’s previously secret unit, JTRIG (Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group). These were based on four classified GCHQ documents presented to the NSA and the other three partners in the English-speaking “Five Eyes” alliance. Today, we at the Intercept are publishing another new JTRIG document, in full, entitled “The Art of Deception: Training for Online Covert Operations.”

By publishing these stories one by one, our NBC reporting highlighted some of the key, discrete revelations: the monitoring of YouTube and Blogger, the targeting of Anonymous with the very same DDoS attacks they accuse “hacktivists” of using, the use of “honey traps” (luring people into compromising situations using sex) and destructive viruses. But, here, I want to focus and elaborate on the overarching point revealed by all of these documents: namely, that these agencies are attempting to control, infiltrate, manipulate, and warp online discourse, and in doing so, are compromising the integrity of the internet itself.

Among the core self-identified purposes of JTRIG are two tactics: (1) to inject all sorts of false material onto the internet in order to destroy the reputation of its targets; and (2) to use social sciences and other techniques to manipulate online discourse and activism to generate outcomes it considers desirable. To see how extremist these programs are, just consider the tactics they boast of using to achieve those ends: “false flag operations” (posting material to the internet and falsely attributing it to someone else), fake victim blog posts (pretending to be a victim of the individual whose reputation they want to destroy), and posting “negative information” on various forums. Here is one illustrative list of tactics from the latest GCHQ document we’re publishing today:

Other tactics aimed at individuals are listed here, under the revealing title “discredit a target”:

 


Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica

Quieren más información porque quieren más poder: #StopSpying #DontSpyOnUs #TheDayWeFightBack | Manzana Mecánica.

Todo este asunto de la vigilancia en Internet puede resumirse así: los gobiernos quieren más control sobre los gobernados.

Quizás pienses que tu información personal no vale nada, que no sirve de nada. Dónde estuviste ayer, por probablemente un montón de gente te vió y sabe dónde estuviste ayer.
Pero no es lo mismo la información de una persona que la de muchas personas.

Imagina que esa información personal acerca de tí es el gas dentro de un mechero/encendedor. Puede ocasionar una llama, pero no es gran cosa. Cualquiera puede tener uno de éstos.

Si ahora piensas en un cilindro/bombona de gas, que en esta analogía podría ser la información de miles de personas, hay algunas reglas, un grosor mínimo del metal, unos estándares.

Pero si quieres 12 metros cúbicos de gas butano en tu patio, o la información personal de cientos de miles de personas, hay bastante papeleo que hacer. A nadie le conviene que se acumule tanto en un lugar sin que existan los resguardos necesarios.

Y para un gasómetro o gran contenedor de gas, que sería la información personal de millones de personas, algo que puede ser tremendamente destructivo, es en el interés de todos que no te permitan hacerlo sin una cuidadosa inspección y los permisos adecuados.