EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian

The European Union is seeking to make it easier for police and law enforcement agencies to retrieve electronic evidence from US tech firms, including directly from cloud storage.

Fuente: EU could give police direct access to cloud data in wake of terror attacks | Technology | The Guardian


In Major Privacy Victory, Top EU Court Rules Against Mass Surveillance

The European Union’s top court has severely undermined the British government’s mass surveillance powers in a new ruling that could rein in police and spy agency investigations.In a judgment handed down in Luxembourg on Wednesday, the European Court of Justice declared that the “general and indiscriminate retention” of data about people’s communications and locations was inconsistent with privacy rights. The court stated that the “highly invasive” bulk storage of private data “exceeds the limits of what is strictly necessary and cannot be considered to be justified, within a democratic society.”

Fuente: In Major Privacy Victory, Top EU Court Rules Against Mass Surveillance


Facebook cede ante las presiones de Bruselas y dejará de compartir datos con Whatsapp – El Independiente

arece que las autoridades europeas están muy cerca de ganar otra batalla contra uno de los gigantes tecnológicos estadounidenses. Apenas unas semanas después de recibir una carta de las autoridades europeas de protección de datos, Facebook ha decidido suspender la transferencia de datos personales de sus usuarios con Whatsapp.

Fuente: Facebook cede ante las presiones de Bruselas y dejará de compartir datos con Whatsapp – El Independiente


WhatsApp asked by European regulators to pause sharing user data with Facebook | Technology | The Guardian

The letters come as European nations express concern over WhatsApp’s changes and Yahoo’s mishandling of its hack and the revelations over US intelligence operations.

Fuente: WhatsApp asked by European regulators to pause sharing user data with Facebook | Technology | The Guardian


Europe’s Top Human Rights Court Will Consider Legality of Surveillance Exposed by Edward Snowden

Ten organizations – including Privacy International, the American Civil Liberties Union, and Amnesty International – are taking up the landmark case against the U.K. government in the European Court of Human Rights (pictured above). In a 115-page complaint released on Thursday, the groups allege that “blanket and indiscriminate” surveillance operations carried out by British spy agencies in collaboration with their U.S. counterparts violate privacy and freedom of expression rights.

Fuente: Europe’s Top Human Rights Court Will Consider Legality of Surveillance Exposed by Edward Snowden


Apple ordered to pay up to €13bn after EU rules Ireland broke state aid laws | Business | The Guardian

European commission says Apple got illegal help with tax breaks but CEO Tim Cook says ruling threatens investment in Europe

Fuente: Apple ordered to pay up to €13bn after EU rules Ireland broke state aid laws | Business | The Guardian


Luxemburger Wort – US steps up fight against EU tax crackdown on Apple

The US stepped up its fight against the European Commission’s crackdown on tax avoidance by Apple and other multinational companies, accusing the commission of unilateralism and overstepping its mandate.In a white paper, the US Treasury said the EC probe into alleged special tax treatment that certain EU countries gave Apple, Amazon, Starbucks and Fiat Chrysler “undermines the international tax system.”

Fuente: Luxemburger Wort – US steps up fight against EU tax crackdown on Apple


TiSA: un nuevo mega tratado económico que sigue el modus operandis del TPP | Derechos Digitales

El Acuerdo en Comercio de Servicios, TiSA por sus siglas en inglés, es un tratado multilateral en vías de negociación entre 23 países, incluyendo a Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea. En América Latina están participando Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panamá, Perú, Paraguay y Chile. El objetivo del tratado es liberalizar el comercio de servicios, como banca, salud, comercio electrónico y transportes a nivel mundial. Las similitudes con el TPP son evidentes: ambos son grandes tratados multilaterales que buscan promover el comercio internacional yendo más allá de la mera disminución de aranceles, homogeneizando la regulación de áreas sensibles de los países involucrados.

Fuente: TiSA: un nuevo mega tratado económico que sigue el modus operandis del TPP | Derechos Digitales


Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline.

Fuente: Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions


Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian

New concerns have been raised about the political influence of Google after research found at least 80 “revolving door” moves in the past decade – instances where the online giant took on government employees and European governments employed Google staff.

Fuente: Google: new concerns raised about political influence by senior ‘revolving door’ jobs | Technology | The Guardian


Cross-border trade online: how Brussels plans to change rules – FT.com

Companies from Google and Netflix to the UK’s Royal Mail were focused on Brussels on Wednesday when the European Commission launched sweeping rules for cross-border digital trade, covering everything from online shopping to streaming services and even parcel delivery

Fuente: Cross-border trade online: how Brussels plans to change rules – FT.com


Privacy activist launches EU-wide challenge to ‘ad blocker blockers’ — FT.com

Publishers who use “ad blocker blockers” face a range of legal challenges across the EU in the latest fight over the increasingly popular but controversial technology. .Ad blockers, which allow browsing free of pop-ups or pre-roll adverts on videos, have come under attack recently from publishers who rely on advertising to pay the bills.Publishers ranging from The New York Times to the technology magazine Wired have taken the step of introducing pop-ups asking users to switch off their ad blockers, and in some cases blocking those who refuse to do so.

Fuente: Privacy activist launches EU-wide challenge to ‘ad blocker blockers’ — FT.com


Europe’s leap into the quantum computing arms race — FT.com

It is a dizzying gamble and there are billions of euros riding on the outcome. If the wager pays off, Europe will hold its own against mighty China and the US; if not, the entire project will be regarded in hindsight as a breathtakingly indulgent folly. I refer, of course, not to the forthcoming referendum on Britain’s EU membership but to the European Commission’s announcement last week that it would be launching a €1bn plan to explore “quantum technologies”. It is the third of the commission’s Future and Emerging Technologies Flagship projects — visionary megaprojects lasting a decade or more. These are challenges too grand — and bets too risky — for a single nation to square up to on its own.

Fuente: Europe’s leap into the quantum computing arms race — FT.com


Google search engine baffles public, Ofcom study shows — FT.com

Half of adults in Britain are unable to identify which Google search results are paid advertisements, according to a study by communications regulator Ofcom.The findings reveal a widespread lack of understanding about the workings of the world’s most popular search engine. They also come as Google faces increased regulatory scrutiny by European authorities.

Fuente: Google search engine baffles public, Ofcom study shows — FT.com


Google warns red tape threatens European tech sector – FT.com

Europe risks falling behind in digital innovation, as regulators and governments discourage entrepreneurs and suffocate technology companies with red tape, says Google’s leading executive on the continent. Matt Brittin told the Financial Times that EU authorities were sceptical of digital change and a maze of regulations were holding back the continent, leaving it lagging behind the US and in danger of being overtaken by China.

Fuente: Google warns red tape threatens European tech sector – FT.com


Google handed €100,000 fine by French data regulator – FT.com

Google has been handed a €100,000 fine by France’s privacy watchdog over allegations that it has not properly applied Europe’s “right to be forgotten” across the world, despite recent concessions made by the internet company to satisfy regulators

Fuente: Google handed €100,000 fine by French data regulator – FT.com


Google confirms it will extend E.U. right-to-be-forgotten to all Google Search domains from next week | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers

Google has confirmed previous reports that it is to comply with European regulators requesting that the Internet giant extend the scope of the so-called “right-to-be-forgotten” legislation beyond that of European search engines.

Fuente: Google confirms it will extend E.U. right-to-be-forgotten to all Google Search domains from next week | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers


New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform

European privacy activists criticized a new Safe Harbor data agreement with the U.S. as a superficial political fix that fails to address NSA spying.

Fuente: New Safe Harbor Data “Deal” May Be More Politicking Than Surveillance Reform


EU agrees strict new regime on data protection – FT.com

The European Union agreed strict new rules on data protection on Tuesday, heralding a new era of major fines for companies who break privacy rules. Businesses face sanctions of up to 4 per cent of global turnover under the agreement, meaning that

Fuente: EU agrees strict new regime on data protection – FT.com


El escándalo de espionaje pone en apuros al Gobierno de Merkel | Internacional | EL PAÍS

El escándalo de espionaje pone en apuros al Gobierno de Merkel | Internacional | EL PAÍS.


La colaboración entre los servicios secretos de Alemania y EE UU desata una tormenta política

Alemania

La canciller alemana, Angela Merkel, en un acto en Berlín el 29 de abril. / JOHN MACDOUGALL (AFP)

El escándalo va creciendo hasta convertirse en una seria amenaza para la canciller Angela Merkel. Todo comenzó hace una semana, con la publicación de que los servicios secretos alemanes habían colaborado con sus colegas estadounidenses para espiar a algunas empresas y políticos. Pero el goteo de revelaciones ha ido subiendo la temperatura política en Alemania hasta que el jueves estalló una bomba de gran potencial destructivo para las relaciones de Berlín con sus socios europeos.

Según el Süddeutsche Zeitung, los estadounidenses se valieron de las instalaciones del BND —los servicios secretos alemanes— para espiar a altos funcionarios de instituciones tan relevantes como la Presidencia de la República Francesa, el Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores francés o la Comisión Europea. Consultados por EL PAÍS, los portavoces del Gobierno ni confirman ni desmienten la información con el argumento de que no pueden interferir en una investigación parlamentaria.

La información, publicada también por las cadenas de televisión NDR y WDR, ha sacudido la política berlinesa. Ya no se trata solo de que los espías alemanes dieran alguna información aislada a la Agencia Nacional de Seguridadestadounidense, la famosa NSA. Las denuncias son ahora más graves. A la sospecha cada vez más fundada de queel ministro del Interior, Thomas de Maizière, mintió al Parlamento sobre el caso, se une la acusación de haber vulnerado la ley para pasar información sobre socios y teóricos amigos en un periodo indeterminado que podría ir de 2002 hasta 2013.

La líder alemana tiene ahora que decidir si cede a la presión y deja caer alguna cabeza. Podría ser la del presidente del BND, Gerhard Schindel. O incluso la del propio De Maizière, uno de sus hombres de confianza, que lo ha sido todo en los tres Gabinetes Merkel: primero jefe de la Cancillería, luego ministro de Defensa y en la última legislatura, titular de Interior.


Cover-up claims over revelation that Germany spied on EU partners for US | World news | The Guardian

Cover-up claims over revelation that Germany spied on EU partners for US | World news | The Guardian.

 The German secret service’s monitoring station in Bad Aibling, Bavaria.
The German secret service’s monitoring station in Bad Aibling, Bavaria. Photograph: Diether Endlicher/EPA

Germany has been spying and eavesdropping on its closest partners in the EU and passing the information to the US for more than a decade, a parliamentary inquiry in Berlin has found, triggering allegations of lying and cover-ups reaching to the very top of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s administration.

There was outrage in Germany two years ago over the revelations by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden of US and British surveillance activities in Europe. The fresh disclosures are embarrassing for Berlin, which stands accused of hypocrisy in its protests about America spying on its allies.

“You don’t spy on your friends,” said Merkel when it was made known to her that her mobile phone was being monitored by the US National Security Agency (NSA). Since then, both sides have been embroiled in arguments about data privacy, with much talk among officials and diplomats of a collapse of German trust in the Americans.

But according to reports on a confidential Bundestag committee of inquiry into the NSA scandal, under a 2002 pact between German intelligence (BND) and theNSA, Berlin used its largest electronic eavesdropping facility in Bavaria to monitor email and telephone traffic at the Élysée Palace, the offices of the French president, and of key EU institutions in Brussels including the European commission.

Thomas de Maizière, the interior minister and a Merkel confidant, is in the firing line for allegedly lying about or covering up the German collaboration with the Americans. The minister has denied the allegations robustly and promised to answer before the parliamentary inquiry “the sooner the better”.

The best-selling tabloid Bildzeitung depicted de Maiziere as Pinocchio this week and accused him of “lying with impunity”. From 2005-9 he served as Merkel’s chief of staff, the post in Berlin that exercises authority over the BND. He is said to have been told of the spying activities in 2008.

German media reports are asserting that if De Maizière knew what was going on he has covered it up, and that if he did not know he was failing in his job while the BND ranged out of political control.

According to the newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung and the public broadcasters WDR and NDR, citing information from the closed parliamentary inquiry, the BND’s biggest listening post at Bad Aibling in Bavaria “was abused for years for NSA spying on European states”.


US tech groups spawn a fight between Europe’s data regulators – FT.com

US tech groups spawn a fight between Europe’s data regulators – FT.com.

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©Bloomberg

Google, Facebook, Apple and now Twitter: the list of companies that submit to Ireland’s data protection regime is a long and growing one.

Twitter last week confirmed that any complaints about data protection from its non-US users will be dealt with by Ireland’s increasingly busy data protection agency.

But not everyone is happy. In Brussels and national capitals across the continent, critics have been grumbling that Dublin’s enforcement of European data protection rules is too weak.

The fact that the Irish Data Protection Commission is housed in Canal House, a dingy looking building on Station Road in Portalington, an hour outside Dublin, is regularly brought up as an example of the limited resources given to data protection — much to the chagrin of Dara Murphy, Ireland’s data protection minister.

“I marvel at the fact that people feel that business can’t be conducted over a grocery shop,” he says.

The Irish say they follow the same rules as everyone else and that the criticism is based less on the basis of enforcement but on the fact that companies such as Twitter and LinkedIn opted for Dublin over Paris, Berlin or Amsterdam.

Mr Murphy believes the arrival of the US technology groups in Ireland has created both jobs and jealousy. “I think if they were all based in Paris, you would not be having the debate coming from France,” he says.

Ireland has also doubled funding for the IDPC to €3.65m. It will also soon open a swankier office in Dublin — while maintaining the office above a shop — and hire two dozen more staff, taking its headcount to around 50.

Even then, however, it will still lack the resources of its peers. Despite the fact that the IDPC oversees the regulation for 29 of the 30 biggest technology businesses in Europe, its budget is eight times smaller than the UK’s regulator.

Ireland also has a more low-key approach than other DPAs. There is regular communication between the IDPC and large US technology groups, with an emphasis on collaboration rather than confrontation. This suits the web giants that have made Ireland their European home over the past decade.

 


Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian

Google’s dominance faces a challenge at last. Shame it’s too late | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Denmarks Economy Minister Margrethe Vest Taking on the search giant: EC competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager. Photograph: Keld Navntoft/AFP/Getty Images

So the European commission has finally decided that Google may have a case to answer in relation to claims that it has been abusing its monopoly position in search. On Thursday, Margrethe Vestager, the competition commissioner, announced that the preliminary findings of the commission’s investigation supported the claim that Google “systematically” gave prominence to its own ads, which amounted to an abuse of its dominant position in search. “I’m concerned,” she said, “that Google has artificially boosted its presence in the comparison shopping market with the result that consumers may not necessarily see what’s most relevant for them or that competitors may not get the commercial opportunity that their innovative services deserve.” Google, which, needless to say, disputes these claims, now has 10 weeks in which to respond.

To those of us who follow these things, the most interesting thing about Thursday’s announcement is the way it highlights the radical differences that are emerging between European and American attitudes to internet giants. The Wall Street Journal recently revealed that the US Federal Trade Commission had investigated similar claims about Google’s abuse of monopoly power in 2012 and that some of the agency’s staff had recommended charging the company with violating antitrust (unfair competition) laws. But in the end, the FTC backed off.

Now it turns out that its staff had been in regular communication with the European commission’s investigators in Brussels, which means that the Europeans knew what the Americans knew about Google’s activities. But the commission has acted, whereas the FTC did not. Why?

Leaving aside conspiracist explanations (eg that the American authorities don’t wish to enfeeble US companies that will ensure continued US economic hegemony in the digital era), the difference may be a reflection of the way in which antitrust law has been gradually infected by neoliberal ideology. Once upon a time, it was taken for granted that industrial monopolies were, by their very nature, intolerable for the simple reason that, as Lord Acton famously observed, power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

But then a radically different idea was injected into the legislative bloodstream by Robert Bork, a distinguished American lawyer, in his 1978 book, The Antitrust Paradox. One implication of Bork’s argument was that overwhelming market dominance was not necessarily a bad thing. Monopoly could be a reflection of a firm’s superior efficiency: we should expect truly exceptional firms to attract the majority of the customers, and so overzealous antitrust prosecutions could effectively punish excellence and thus disadvantage, rather than protect, consumers.


Bruselas acusa a Google y abre una investigación sobre Android | Economía | EL PAÍS

Bruselas acusa a Google y abre una investigación sobre Android | Economía | EL PAÍS.


La Comisión actúa contra el buscador por abuso de posición dominante al favorecer sus productos en las búsquedas

Google

El logo de Google, en su sede de Bruselas. / VIRGINIA MAYO (AP)

Bruselas ha iniciado la mayor ofensiva planteada hasta ahora contra el todopoderoso buscador Google. Tras cinco años de dudas, la Comisión Europea acusó ayer al gigante estadounidense de abuso de posición dominante en el mercado de las búsquedas, una decisión ya anticipada en los últimos días. Las autoridades de Competencia creen que Google discrimina a sus competidores al otorgar siempre, en las búsquedas de Internet, un lugar privilegiado a sus propios servicios especializados. La empresa deberá ahora defenderse y, si sus alegaciones no convencen al Ejecutivo comunitario, este podrá imponer multas de hasta un 10% de la facturación de la compañía (un máximo de 6.200 millones de euros, aunque esa cuantía resulta bastante improbable).

Consciente de que este movimiento abre un enfrentamiento con Estados Unidos, la comisaria de Competencia, Margrethe Vestager, trató de restar importancia a la dimensión territorial de esta batalla: “Ni mis hijos ni yo consideraríamos nunca, al usar Google, si se trata de una compañía estadounidense o europea, sino el hecho de que tenga buenos productos. El problema no es que sea una empresa dominante, sino que dé trato preferencial a sus propios servicios”.

Vestager añadió que uno de cada cuatro denunciantes de Google —hay una veintena que han presentado quejas a la Comisión solo por las supuestas discriminaciones en las búsquedas— son estadounidenses.

Pese a todo, el caso Google ha adquirido un cariz muy político en el que dirigentes alemanes y franceses han protestado abiertamente sobre el poder de la firma estadounidense y el propio presidente Barack Obama ha recelado del proceso europeo. Quizá por eso, la comisaria danesa ha limitado enormemente el alcance de acción contra Google para concentrarla en el caso más claro y sobre el que ha recibido más denuncias de terceros: la infracción de las leyes europeas en las búsquedas que hacen los usuarios para comparar precios de un mismo producto.

El buscador, que tiene una cuota de mercado superior al 90% en casi todos los países europeos —en Estados Unidos es inferior al 80%—, muestra siempre en primer lugar su propia oferta comparativa, de nombre Google Shopping. Independientemente de si lo merece o no, ese servicio obtiene una posición privilegiada desde 2008, lo que resta visibilidad a sus rivales. Bruselas alega que en un principio, cuando Google no empleaba esa conducta, los resultados de su servicio de compras, entonces llamado Froogle, eran muy pobres. Con el trato privilegiado, su cuota comenzó a crecer.


Brussels to investigate Google’s Android platform – FT.com

Brussels to investigate Google’s Android platform – FT.com.

 

An employee views movie titles on the blinkbox website as he demonstrates Tesco Plc's new Hudl tablet handheld device during its launch in London, United Kingdom, on Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. Tesco, the U.K.'s biggest retailer, today launched it's own tablet handheld device which will run Google Inc.'s Android operating system. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg©Bloomberg

Brussels will launch a formal investigation into Google’s Android smartphone platform on Wednesday, opening a fresh front in the EU’s antitrust battle with the US group.

As well as accusing Google’s search business of breaking antitrust laws, Margrethe Vestager, the EU competition commissioner, will unveil a separate probe into whether Google foists uncompetitive terms on smartphone providers using Android.

The European Commission has informally examined Android for almost three years and strongly hinted that it has some concerns in the wake of complaints from companies including Microsoft and Nokia, which make the rival Windows phone range.

According to people familiar with the planned investigation, the commission is to focus on two main areas: the distribution terms for Google’s “suite” of apps, and the compatibility tests to become an official version of Android-carrying Google apps.While widely expected, the formal launch of an investigation will nevertheless be a blow to Google and add a further layer of complication to its regulatory travails in Europe, which touch on everything from privacy policy to alleged search bias.

 


Europe accuses Google of illegally abusing its dominance – FT.com

Europe accuses Google of illegally abusing its dominance – FT.co

 

European Union's competition chief Margrethe Vestager speaks during a media conference regarding Google at EU headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday, April 15, 2015. The European Union's executive hit Google with an official antitrust complaint on Wednesday that alleges the company abuses its dominance in Internet searches and also opened a probe into its Android mobile system. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)©AP

The EU’s antitrust chief has formally accused Google of illegally using its dominance in online search to steer European consumers to its own in-house shopping services in the opening salvo of what is expected to be a defining competition case of the internet era.

Margrethe Vestager also announced the European Commission would open an investigation into Google’s Android mobile platform amid allegations it forces wireless companies into uncompetitive contracts to use its software.

Ms Vestager made clear the move against Google Shopping was potentially just the first step in her case. She said her staff continued to investigate whether other Google services, such as its travel search function, similarly advantaged the company’s in-house service providers. She vowed to widen the case if abuses were found.

“I am concerned that the company has given an unfair advantage to its own comparison shopping service, in breach of EU antitrust rules,” Ms Vestager said. “Google now has the opportunity to convince the commission to the contrary.”

In an outline of its so-called statement of objections, the commission said that the US-based tech giant “systematically positions and prominently displays” its own shopping service in search results regardless of its merits, arguing the conduct started in 2008.

The commission said the conduct enabled Google’s service to achieve “higher rates of growth, to the detriment of rival comparison shopping services”.

Shopping was the first area in which the commission received a complaint over Google’s conduct, from the British price comparison site, Foundem. The complaints have since snowballed to include online travel services such as Expedia, as well as large players including Microsoft, and French and German publishers.

Google now has 10 weeks to respond and allay the commission’s concerns. It also has a right to a hearing in the coming months, normally attended by national representatives, in which all the main arguments can be aired.

If Google’s defence is unsuccessful, it faces a large fine, theoretically as much as 10 per cent of the previous year’s turnover, some $66bn in 2014.

 


Reforma al copyright en Europa es demasiado positiva para los ciudadanos: Disney, Elsevier, y otros tienen 2 meses para detenerla | Manzana Mecánica

Reforma al copyright en Europa es demasiado positiva para los ciudadanos: Disney, Elsevier, y otros tienen 2 meses para detenerla | Manzana Mecánica.

Lunes 6 Abr 2015

El Parlamento Europeo está evaluando cambios a la directiva europea sobre copyright, que data del 2001. La propuesta base es la desarrollada por Julia Reda, que basada en una consulta ciudadana, propone un mercado digital único para Europa y una serie de derechos para los ciudadanos, bibliotecas, y instituciones de enseñanza con el objeto de difundir la ciencia y la cultura.

El mercado digital único para Europa significará el fin del mensaje “este vídeo no está disponible en tu país,” al establecer que la licencia de uso de contenido en un país europeo será válida para cualquier otro país europeo.

La respuesta de los dos grupos mayoritarios del parlamento europeo, socialdemócratas y populares, ha sido bastante negativa hasta el momento. En total, se han introducido más de 500 enmiendas. Muchas de ellas pueden resumirse en una sola frase: no queremos que cambie nada.

¿Quiénes están detrás de esta feroz oposición a una reforma? Gracias a medidas de transparencia, conocemos la lista de empresas que han solicitado reuniones con parlamentarios europeos para discutir este proyecto. Estas empresas incluyen a Disney, Elsevier, y Vivendi, además de las sociedades de “derecho de autor” de varios países europeos, las cuales básicamente representan los intereses de los intermediarios culturales como editoriales y discográficas.

En los últimos años el intenso lobby de esta industria ha conseguido avances impensables, extremadamente peligrosos para los propios ciudadanos europeos. Por ejemplo, en Francia compartir archivos por Internet tiene ahora una pena similar a la del homicidio involuntario, y en España mientras que matar a alguien por imprudencia grave (por ejemplo, por jugar con una pistola cargada) tiene una pena máxima de 4 años de cárcel, tener una página de enlaces puede castigarse con 6 años de cárcel.

En contraste, la propuesta de Julia Reda propone armonizar en la Unión Europea las excepciones al copyright, como el derecho a citar y a parodiar, además permitir a las bibliotecas digitalizar libros y prestarlos como e-books, pagando el importe correspondiente. La reforma toca muchos otros aspectos relacionados con los derechos de los usuarios sobre sus propias creaciones digitales, por ejemplo, establece que las fotografías de monumentos en espacios públicos no necesitan pagar derechos a los dueños de estos monumentos.


Facebook admits it tracks non-users, but denies claims it breaches EU privacy law | Technology | The Guardian

Facebook admits it tracks non-users, but denies claims it breaches EU privacy law | Technology | The Guardian.

 facebook app
Facebook claims report stating it breaches EU data privacy law ‘gets it wrong’, but admits to tracking non-users. Photograph: Anatolii Babii / Alamy/Alamy

Facebook has admitted that it tracked users who do not have an account with the social network, but says that the tracking only happened because of a bug that is now being fixed.

The social network hit out at the report commissioned by the Belgian data protection authority, which found Facebook in breach of European data privacy laws, saying that the report “gets it wrong multiple times in asserting how Facebook uses information”.

“The researchers did find a bug that may have sent cookies to some people when they weren’t on Facebook. This was not our intention – a fix for this is already under way,” wrote Richard Allan, Facebook’s vice president of policy for Europe in a rebuttal.

Allan listed and responded to eight claims isolated from the report written by researchers at the Centre of Interdisciplinary Law and ICT (ICRI) and the Computer Security and Industrial Cryptography department (Cosic) at the University of Leuven, and the media, information and telecommunication department (Smit) at Vrije Universiteit Brussels.

Some of the claims listed by Facebook are not made in the report, including one that states “there’s no way to opt out of social ads”. The report clearly states that “users can opt-out from appearing in so-called Social Ads”.

“Facebook’s latest press release (entitled “Setting the record straight”) attributes statements to us that we simply did not make,” said authors of the study Brendan Van Alsenoy from the ICRI and Günes Acar from Cosic.


Data privacy: the tide is turning in Europe – but is it too little, too late? | Technology | The Guardian

Data privacy: the tide is turning in Europe – but is it too little, too late? | Technology | The Guardian.

Simultaneous legal cases suggest that the need to assert the digital rights of citizens over corporations and governments is finally being addressed

Max Schrems
Cases such as Max Schrems’ lawsuit against Facebook are asserting fundamental rights of privacy and data protection. Photograph: Max Schrems/Europe-V-Facebook.or/PA

Amazon Dash – the company’s single purpose internet-connected ordering button – may soon be blackening our skies with drones delivering loo rolls and detergent. And so, the relentless march of technology – not to mention cheap labour, unthinking consumerism and scandalous environmental devastation – goes on.

But while more convenient ordering of washing powder might have captured the headlines of late, Europe has been in the midst of a technological step change; a pivot in the world of data privacy.

Several notable events at the end of March, in Luxembourg, London and Geneva, show a glimmer of hope that those frail, beaten rights – privacy and data protection – might yet see their true worth in the digital age.

A moment, first, in defence of privacy – reports of whose death are, I hope, greatly exaggerated.

Privacy is a right for all – not just the filthy rich

Many fall into the trap of seeing privacy in an overly atomistic, individualistic, selfish way; the preserve of the filthy rich. And it is, if we see it as separable from collective freedom, or as absolute over other rights – of freedom of expression, opinion and association; freedom to protest; freedom to resist. But this is not privacy’s ask.

Privacy is about having decisional power, control, over which acts and events of our lives are disclosed and to whom, free from the prying eyes of states, corporations and neighbours. Privacy affords us the freedom to develop ourselves in the world.

The crux of the issue with digital technology is that our ability to make decisions and to control our personal information – the links and traces of our lives – is all but lost. Mostly without our knowledge, and certainly without informed consent, nation states sweep our data alleging ‘national security’ interests, whether legitimate or not. Corporations sweep our data, because they have powerful economic incentives to do so – and, with the capitalist lurch, no reason not to.

So what can be done to reclaim this systematic erosion; to reinstate rights over the long echo of our digital whispers and wanderings? In Europe, there are some rumblings of resistance. They are the rumblings of citizens, of regulators, of courts. And they are starting to find their voice.


Un informe acusa a Facebook de rastrear a los internautas ilegalmente | Tecnología | EL PAÍS

Un informe acusa a Facebook de rastrear a los internautas ilegalmente | Tecnología | EL PAÍS.


La Agencia de Privacidad Belga, integrante de una acción europea que investiga cómo trata la privacidad esta red social, asegura que el gigante de Zuckerberg rompe el marco legal europeo. La compañía afirma que el informe es “incorrecto”

Facebook

Un empleado de Facebook en su sede de Menlo Park. / JEFF CHIU (AP)

El archivo se llama datr. Y funciona como un sabueso cada vez que uno, sea usuario o no, entra en una página del dominio Facebook.com. Tiene una duración de dos años y envía información a la red social sobre qué webs visita el usuario de entre las más de 13 millones que contienen un botón delike a Facebook. Da igual que el usuario lo pulse o no. Estas y otras cookies—archivo que marca a los internautas para guardar un registro de su comportamiento en Internet— son uno de los puntos en los que Facebook rompe la legalidad europea según un informe de 65 páginas encargado por la Comisión de Privacidad Belga y desvelado en exclusiva por The Guardian. “Estas cookies significan: Facebook rastrea a sus usuarios por la red incluso si no hacen uso de los plug-in sociales [por ejemplo, los botones de like que redirigen a Facebook] y aunque no estén logueados [con su perfil de Facebook activo]; y este rastreo no se limita a los usuarios de Facebook”.

Para los autores de este informe —elaborado bajo el encargo de la agencia belga por el Centro de Legalidad Interdisciplinar e ICT (ICRI), el departamento de la Universidad de Leuven y el departamento de medios, información y telecomunicación de la Universidad Vrije de Bruselas—, esta actuación de Facebook rompe la legalidad europea. En concreto, el artículo 5(3) de la directiva e-privacyaprobada en 2002 por el Parlamento Europeo en la que se prohíbe el uso decookies para los usuarios que no se suscriban a una web salvo que se trate de facilitar la “transmisión de comunicación” o para proveer de un servicio social de información que haya sido “explícitamente requerido por su suscriptor o usuario”. Según este estudio, el uso que Facebook hace de su datr. no cae en ninguna de estas excepciones.


Leave Facebook if you don't want to be snooped on, warns EU | Technology | The Guardian

Leave Facebook if you don’t want to be snooped on, warns EU | Technology | The Guardian.

European Commission admits Safe Harbour framework cannot ensure privacy of EU citizens’ data when sent to the US by American internet firms

European flags at the EC
The Safe Harbour Framework that is meant to protect the data of EU citizens when sent to the US by American technology firms including Facebook are not adequate the European Commission has admitted. Photograph: Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

The European Commission has warned EU citizens that they should close their Facebook accounts if they want to keep information private from US security services, finding that current Safe Harbour legislation does not protect citizen’s data.

The comments were made by EC attorney Bernhard Schima in a case brought by privacy campaigner Maximilian Schrems, looking at whether the data of EU citizens should be considered safe if sent to the US in a post-Snowden revelation landscape.

“You might consider closing your Facebook account, if you have one,” Schima told attorney general Yves Bot in a hearing of the case at the European court of justice in Luxembourg.

When asked directly, the commission could not confirm to the court that the Safe Harbour rules provide adequate protection of EU citizens’ data as it currently stands.

The US no longer qualifies

The case, dubbed “the Facebook data privacy case”, concerns the current Safe Harbour framework, which covers the transmission of EU citizens’ data across the Atlantic to the US. Without the framework, it is against EU law to transmit private data outside of the EU. The case collects complaints lodged against Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Microsoft-owned Skype and Yahoo.

Schrems maintains that companies operating inside the EU should not be allowed to transfer data to the US under Safe Harbour protections – which state that US data protection rules are adequate if information is passed by companies on a “self-certify” basis – because the US no longer qualifies for such a status.

The case argues that the US government’s Prism data collection programme, revealed by Edward Snowden in the NSA files, which sees EU citizens’ data held by US companies passed on to US intelligence agencies, breaches the EU’s Data Protection Directive “adequacy” standard for privacy protection, meaning that the Safe Harbour framework no longer applies.


Facebook sigue sin cumplir con la legislación europea de privacidad

Facebook sigue sin cumplir con la legislación europea de privacidad.


Un informe elaborado por la Universidad de Lovaina concluye que Facebook sigue violando la legislación europea sobre privacidad, pese a que cambió sus políticas en enero

La red social se atribuye la potestad de rastrear a sus usuarios en webs y dispositivos, usar sus fotos de perfil para propósitos comerciales y no comerciales y recopilar información

En lo que se refiere al smartphone, Facebook no ofrece ninguna manera de que no se cree un registro con la localización del usuario a través de su aplicación móvil

El Centro Interdisciplinario para las Leyes y las Tecnologías de la Información y de la comunicación, perteneciente a la Universidad de Lovaina (en Bélgica), ha publicado un informe acerca de cómo casan los términos de servicio de Facebook con la legislación europea. Y las conclusiones presentadas indican que la red social viola la normativa europea en varios aspectos.

El trabajo lo ha encargado la Comisión de Privacidad de Bélgica, que ahora debe valorar los resultados. El informe está orientado a evaluar los cambios que Facebook hizo en sus condiciones y sus políticas respecto al usuario, que entraron en vigor a partir del 30 de enero. En el texto se apunta que la actualización solo ha “expandido políticas y prácticas antiguas”, mientras que “todavía viola la ley europea de protección al consumidor”.


What's Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name? – The Intercept

What’s Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name? – The Intercept.

Featured photo - What’s Scarier: Terrorism, or Governments Blocking Websites in its Name?

The French Interior Ministry on Monday ordered that five websites be blocked on the grounds that they promote or advocate terrorism. “I do not want to see sites that could lead people to take up arms on the Internet,” proclaimed Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve.

When the block functions properly, visitors to those banned sites, rather than accessing the content of the sites they chose to visit, will be automatically redirected to the Interior Ministry website. There, they will be greeted by a graphic of a large red hand, and text informing them that they were attempting to access a site that causes or promotes terrorism: “you are being redirected to this official website since your computer was about to connect with a page that provokes terrorist acts or condones terrorism publicly.”

No judge reviews the Interior Ministry’s decisions. The minister first requests that the website owner voluntarily remove the content he deems transgressive; upon disobedience, the minister unilaterally issues the order to Internet service providers for the sites to be blocked. This censorship power is vested pursuant to a law recently enacted in France empowering the interior minister to block websites.

Forcibly taking down websites deemed to be supportive of terrorism, or criminalizing speech deemed to “advocate” terrorism, is a major trend in both Europe and the West generally. Last month in Brussels, the European Union’s counter-terrorism coordinator issued a memo proclaiming that “Europe is facing an unprecedented, diverse and serious terrorist threat,” and argued that increased state control over the Internet is crucial to combating it.

The memo noted that “the EU and its Member States have developed several initiatives related to countering radicalisation and terrorism on the Internet,” yet argued that more must be done. It argued that the focus should be on “working with the main players in the Internet industry [a]s the best way to limit the circulation of terrorist material online.” It specifically hailed the tactics of the U.K. Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), which has succeeded in causing the removal of large amounts of material it deems “extremist”:

In addition to recommending the dissemination of “counter-narratives” by governments, the memo also urged EU member states to “examine the legal and technical possibilities to remove illegal content.”


Freedom campaigners warn against EU ministers pushing for 2-speed internet | Technology | The Guardian

Freedom campaigners warn against EU ministers pushing for 2-speed internet | Technology | The Guardian.

Federal communications commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel after the FCC vote on net neutrality in the US. The FCC adopted and set sustainable rules of the road that will protect free expression and innovation on the internet.Federal communications commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel after the FCC vote on net neutrality in the US. The FCC adopted and set sustainable rules of the road that will protect free expression and innovation on the internet. Photograph: Brian Cahn/Corbis

European ministers are pushing for new laws which would “permit every imaginable breach of net neutrality”, internet freedom campaigners have warned.

Days after the US voted to protect an open internet where all traffic is considered equal, proposals agreed by European telecoms ministers of 28 members states could allow a two–speed internet, where companies such as YouTube or Netflix could legally pay mobile networks or broadband providers for faster, more reliable delivery of their content – potentially to the detriment of other internet users.

Campaigners warn the move could stifle online innovation and undermine the digital economy.


Cyber security rules raise fears of digital protectionism – FT.com

Cyber security rules raise fears of digital protectionism – FT.com.

March 5, 2015 1:48 pm

Computer board with chips and components©Dreamstime

Talk of protectionism once meant bemoaning barriers being erected in far-off lands for offcuts of beef or steel rods, but in Washington these days the protectionism fears have gone digital.

Mindful of the world-leading position of domestic technology companies like Google and Microsoft and eager to maintain their competitiveness in the face of new challengers, the US is increasingly pushing back against what it sees as a rising tide of protectionism aimed at the US tech sector in China, Europe and elsewhere.

In the latest example, President Barack Obama has led US complaints over new Chinese cyber security rules for the banking industry that tech companies complain would in effect shut them out of an important market.

The president said this week that he had raised American concerns over the new rules with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping. “We have made it very clear to them that this is something they are going to have to change if they are to do business with the United States,” he told Reuters on Monday.

Senior US officials including Jack Lew, the Treasury secretary, and John Kerry, secretary of state, have also raised “serious concerns” about the regulations. “The rules are not about security. They are about protectionism and favouring Chinese companies,” said Mike Froman, the US trade representative.

Mr Froman raised the possibility that China might be violating its commitments under bilateral and multilateral trade agreements if it implemented the new rules for the banking sector as planned this month. Other US officials have said Washington is examining whether it could take China to the World Trade Organisation over them in what could become a landmark case at the trade body.

But the concerns being expressed in the US capital about digital protectionism go beyond the new Chinese rules. Mr Obama last month accused European officials of disguising protectionism behind “high-minded” security and privacy concerns. They have also become a growing part of the conversation technology executives have with political leaders when they visit the US capital.

“We’re focused on the situation around the world,” Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel, said after a day of meetings with members of Congress this week. “China is an important market. Other countries are obviously important as well. There are aspects of protectionism that we have to worry about in many countries.”

In depth

Cyber warfare

Cyber security

As online threats race up national security agendas and governments look at ways of protecting their national infrastructures a cyber arms race is causing concern to the developed world

Further reading

The perceived pushback against US tech companies is partly the result of concerns triggered by the revelations of whistleblower Edward Snowden about US cyber-snooping around the world. US officials and executives, however, argue that the response in places like Europe and China now appears targeted more at keeping US businesses out of competitive markets than protecting citizens from privacy concerns.

“We also have to get the balance right between privacy and security. There are trade aspects but there are other aspects as well,” Mr Smith said.

“The short story is that these issues are of growing importance and have a broadening impact. We’re seeing more countries consider them and it is going to require a thoughtful dialogue among a number of governments to sort this out.”

US policy makers and experts are also beginning to fret about the US’s competitive advantage in the trade in all things digital.

To many, the future of globalisation is overwhelmingly digital with emails and 3D printing threatening to replace container ships, and services increasingly delivered online and across borders.

In that context, online barriers such as the “Great Firewall” of China erected to keep out content Beijing objects to, look like impediments to free trade as much as to free speech.

Before the recent controversy over China’s new rules, the US was focusing its energies on making sure that new trade agreements — such as the vast, 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership now nearing conclusion — limit the restrictions that can be put on the flow of data across borders.

The US has also been pushing for a new agreement on services it is negotiating in Geneva with the EU and more than 20 other countries to guarantee the free flow of data across borders. China has sought to join those negotiations but has been blocked from joining by the US.