Facebook Won’t Say If It Will Use Your Brain Activity for Advertisements

“We have taken a distinctly different, non-invasive and deeply scientific approach to building a brain-computer speech-to-text interface,” the company says, describing the project as “a silent speech interface with the speed and flexibility of voice and the privacy of text,” with a stated goal of allowing “100 words per minute, straight from the speech center of your brain.” This process will be executed “via non-invasive sensors that can be shipped at scale” using “optical imaging” that can poll “brain activity hundreds of times per second.”

Fuente: Facebook Won’t Say If It Will Use Your Brain Activity for Advertisements


Las ciudades inteligentes y el problema de la vigilancia | Derechos Digitales

Las tecnologías inteligentes apuntan a mejorar las condiciones de vida en las ciudades. Sin embargo, son también capaces de poner en entredicho nuestra privacidad. ¿Cuál es el límite de lo smart?

Fuente: Las ciudades inteligentes y el problema de la vigilancia | Derechos Digitales


How old do you look? I wouldn’t ask the internet | Tim Dowling | Opinion | The Guardian

The how-old.net website – which uses photos to judge your age – didn’t work for me. For women and refugees, of course, there’s the Daily Mail

Fuente: How old do you look? I wouldn’t ask the internet | Tim Dowling | Opinion | The Guardian


Microsoft Pitches Technology That Can Read Facial Expressions at Political Rallies

On the 21st floor of a high-rise hotel in Cleveland, in a room full of political operatives, Microsoft’s Research Division was advertising a technology that could read each facial expression in a massive crowd, analyze the emotions, and report back in real time. “You could use this at a Trump rally,” a sales representative told me.

Fuente: Microsoft Pitches Technology That Can Read Facial Expressions at Political Rallies


Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity | Technology | The Guardian

FindFace compares photos to profile pictures on social network Vkontakte and works out identities with 70% reliability

Fuente: Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity | Technology | The Guardian


Revealed: how facial recognition has invaded shops – and your privacy | Cities | The Guardian

Retailers are increasingly using facial recognition technology to track your face. With an estimated 59% of UK fashion retailers doing it, is the anonymity of cities an outdated idea?

Fuente: Revealed: how facial recognition has invaded shops – and your privacy | Cities | The Guardian


Privacy fears over 'smart' Barbie that can listen to your kids | Technology | The Guardian

Privacy fears over ‘smart’ Barbie that can listen to your kids | Technology | The Guardian.

Hello Barbie toy
 Hello Barbie listens to children using cloud-based voice recognition technology, to understand them and talk back. Photograph: Mattel

A “smart” Barbie doll that can have “conversations” with children should not go on sale, privacy advocates have said.

Billed as the world’s first “interactive doll”, the toy uses voice recognition technology similar to that employed by Apple’s Siri and Google’s Now digital assistants to understand what a child is saying to Barbie and respond.

However, privacy advocates are worried about the use of voice recognition technology that sends recordings of children to third-party companies for processing, potentially revealing his or her intimate thoughts and details.

“If I had a young child, I would be very concerned that my child’s intimate conversations with her doll were being recorded and analysed,” said Professor Angela Campbell of Georgetown University law school.

“In Mattel’s demo, Barbie asks many questions that would elicit a great deal of information about a child, her interests, and her family. This information could be of great value to advertisers and be used to market unfairly to children.”